Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


barry2B wrote:

The Tehran Initiative 

 

I am currently reading this. Joel is one of my favorite authors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Brotherhood (Precinct 11 Series #1)   

 

 


Hi Barry, it's been a while, good to see you.

 

Right now I'm reading a classic holiday tale :smileyhappy:

 

All I Want for Christmas Is a Vampire (Love at Stake Series #5)  

Scribe
optic_i
Posts: 750
Registered: ‎06-26-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading


Peppermill wrote:

Somehow I feel like we are in Disasters 101 and I don't remember signing up.   :smileyhappy:

 

Hurricanes, earthquakes, October snowstorms, .....



Hi Pepper, It sure has been a strange year so far !  And we still have a couple months to go, But for now anyway we have the power restored, 11 days !  It's so strange here some of the trees are still green, and it was 70 and sunny today.    :smileyhappy:    

                                                                          Optic

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading


optic_i wrote:

Peppermill wrote:

Somehow I feel like we are in Disasters 101 and I don't remember signing up.   :smileyhappy:

 

Hurricanes, earthquakes, October snowstorms, .....



Hi Pepper, It sure has been a strange year so far !  And we still have a couple months to go, But for now anyway we have the power restored, 11 days !  It's so strange here some of the trees are still green, and it was 70 and sunny today.    :smileyhappy:    

                                                                          Optic


YEAH!

 

Many of our maples are just turning the reds they usually are in October.  I was amazed at the brilliant scarlets in my neighborhood today.  Yet we have so many branches everywhere broken off by the heavy snow on branches still heavy and dense with leaves, not allowing the snow to fall to the ground however many days ago that was.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading


Peppermill wrote:

optic_i wrote:

Peppermill wrote:

Somehow I feel like we are in Disasters 101 and I don't remember signing up.   :smileyhappy:

 

Hurricanes, earthquakes, October snowstorms, .....



Hi Pepper, It sure has been a strange year so far !  And we still have a couple months to go, But for now anyway we have the power restored, 11 days !  It's so strange here some of the trees are still green, and it was 70 and sunny today.    :smileyhappy:    

                                                                          Optic


YEAH!

 

Many of our maples are just turning the reds they usually are in October.  I was amazed at the brilliant scarlets in my neighborhood today.  Yet we have so many branches everywhere broken off by the heavy snow on branches still heavy and dense with leaves, not allowing the snow to fall to the ground however many days ago that was.


Pepper, I'm glad that you are all okay where you are and I'm really glad that optic has power again.

 

Yesterday it was in the 70s here and today the high will be in the 40s whew. Changes are a coming :smileyhappy:

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos
New User
hwadsworth
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎11-09-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

...just finished reading 'Tomorrow's Gray Sky'; it was incredible and a refreshing new collection of poetry! But, don't know why I couldn't leave a review, anybody else having problems leaving reviews?

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

Tomorrow's Gray Sky  by Triston Robert Kelly

 


hwadsworth wrote:

...just finished reading 'Tomorrow's Gray Sky'; it was incredible and a refreshing new collection of poetry! But, don't know why I couldn't leave a review, anybody else having problems leaving reviews?


I seldom write a review on the B&N sites (may do a short one here from time to time) so am no help on the problems you encountered.  Thanks for the heads up on the book.  It reminds me of my first November in Vermont, for when I always swore I learned a new color: "Vermont November grey."  (I don't recall succeeding Novembers being as cloudy and overcast as that first one.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


hwadsworth wrote:

...just finished reading 'Tomorrow's Gray Sky'; it was incredible and a refreshing new collection of poetry! But, don't know why I couldn't leave a review, anybody else having problems leaving reviews?


hi, hwadsworth, welcome to the forum.

It could be a browser issue, if you're using Safari the B&N website sometimes doesn't like that, but yesterday I had trouble with Firefox too. I'll send my admin and techhie a note and see if there's anything going on.

 

Pepper thanks again for helping out, what would I do without you here, you are as always appreciated.

 

 

New User
hwadsworth
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎11-09-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf

Thank you Pepper and thank you Debbie! I'm sure it's fine. I've had two books waiting for me, Pat Buchanan's, 'Churchill, Hitler and the Unnecessary War', and John Harris's new one. Was needing a break from poetry, I also just finished Phillip Levine's most recent collection.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


hwadsworth wrote:

Thank you Pepper and thank you Debbie! I'm sure it's fine. I've had two books waiting for me, Pat Buchanan's, 'Churchill, Hitler and the Unnecessary War', and John Harris's new one. Was needing a break from poetry, I also just finished Phillip Levine's most recent collection.


 

HW -- you can use the add product feature to add links and pictures of books to your posts if you like.

 

Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War" by Patrick J. Buchanan

 

(Not sure which is the new one by John Harris.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


coffee_luvr wrote:

....  I also just finished Mudbound by Hillary Jordan -- this was a sobering subject but really liked the way the author had each character "talk" about the story from their perspective.  [from Stephanie's column on what we were currently reading in June 2010]


Mudbound  by Hillary Jordan

 

Coffee_luvr brought this to my attention in June of 2010, then it disappeared from my radar.  (Stephenie and Ibis had read it earlier, according to posts here.)  I don't know what brought it forward again, but I know I was looking for something as an adult antidote to another reading of To Kill a Mockingbird  (Harper Lee).  This certainly fits that bill!

 

In a recent interview by Emily Scordato upon the release of her new book, When She Woke, Hillary Jordan said: “That Mudbound was thought worthy of being taught in universities and high schools was by far the most thrilling part of having the book published. The first time I got a letter from a teacher who was teaching the book to her tenth grade class, I burst into tears.” 

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Unabashedly-Bookish-The-BN/When-She-Woke-We-Interview-Hillary...

 

Mudbound was quick read for me.  Like some others, I was able to set it aside, but when I picked it up again, it was rather like a tall soda one doesn't put back down until finished, and then a bit reluctantly.  (The analogy falters if pushed towards pleasantness -- Barbara Kingsolver has written of the story "Her characters walked straight out of 1940s Mississippi and into the part of my brain where sympathy and anger and love reside, leaving my heart racing. They are with me still.") You can see reader reactions elsewhere on the characterizations and the plot line, so I'm not going to summarize them here.  I will only say, as Kingsolver and others have, this is a tale and a set of characters likely to stay with me, which is not a comment I make about many novels -- a few insightful ideas are about what I demand of an author.

 

The novel was published by Algonquin Books; it was awarded the 2006 Bellwether Prize (established by Barbara Kingsolver about 2000), recognizing an unpublished manuscript promoting social responsibility,

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellwether_Prize

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


Peppermill wrote:

coffee_luvr wrote:

....  I also just finished Mudbound by Hillary Jordan -- this was a sobering subject but really liked the way the author had each character "talk" about the story from their perspective.  [from Stephanie's column on what we were currently reading in June 2010]


Mudbound  by Hillary Jordan

 

Coffee_luvr brought this to my attention in June of 2010, then it disappeared from my radar.  (Stephenie and Ibis had read it earlier, according to posts here.)  I don't know what brought it forward again, but I know I was looking for something as an adult antidote to another reading of To Kill a Mockingbird  (Harper Lee).  This certainly fits that bill!

 

In a recent interview by Emily Scordato upon the release of her new book, When She Woke, Hillary Jordan said: “That Mudbound was thought worthy of being taught in universities and high schools was by far the most thrilling part of having the book published. The first time I got a letter from a teacher who was teaching the book to her tenth grade class, I burst into tears.” 

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Unabashedly-Bookish-The-BN/When-She-Woke-We-Interview-Hillary...

 

Mudbound was quick read for me.  Like some others, I was able to set it aside, but when I picked it up again, it was rather like a tall soda one doesn't put back down until finished, and then a bit reluctantly.  (The analogy falters if pushed towards pleasantness -- Barbara Kingsolver has written of the story "Her characters walked straight out of 1940s Mississippi and into the part of my brain where sympathy and anger and love reside, leaving my heart racing. They are with me still.") You can see reader reactions elsewhere on the characterizations and the plot line, so I'm not going to summarize them here.  I will only say, as Kingsolver and others have, this is a tale and a set of characters likely to stay with me, which is not a comment I make about many novels -- a few insightful ideas are about what I demand of an author.

 

The novel was published by Algonquin Books; it was awarded the 2006 Bellwether Prize (established by Barbara Kingsolver about 2000), recognizing an unpublished manuscript promoting social responsibility,

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellwether_Prize


This is the book I am planning for my next read!  I think what brought it to the forefront for me is that the author just released a new book, one which I don't think I would be interested in, but it made me realize that I still hadn't read her first book.

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Tell us what you're reading right now and what's next on your shelf


Fozzie wrote:

Peppermill wrote:

coffee_luvr wrote:

....  I also just finished Mudbound by Hillary Jordan -- this was a sobering subject but really liked the way the author had each character "talk" about the story from their perspective.  [from Stephanie's column on what we were currently reading in June 2010]


Mudbound  by Hillary Jordan

 

Coffee_luvr brought this to my attention in June of 2010, then it disappeared from my radar.  (Stephenie and Ibis had read it earlier, according to posts here.)  I don't know what brought it forward again, but I know I was looking for something as an adult antidote to another reading of To Kill a Mockingbird  (Harper Lee).  This certainly fits that bill!

 

In a recent interview by Emily Scordato upon the release of her new book, When She Woke, Hillary Jordan said: “That Mudbound was thought worthy of being taught in universities and high schools was by far the most thrilling part of having the book published. The first time I got a letter from a teacher who was teaching the book to her tenth grade class, I burst into tears.” 

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Unabashedly-Bookish-The-BN/When-She-Woke-We-Interview-Hillary...

 

Mudbound was quick read for me.  Like some others, I was able to set it aside, but when I picked it up again, it was rather like a tall soda one doesn't put back down until finished, and then a bit reluctantly.  (The analogy falters if pushed towards pleasantness -- Barbara Kingsolver has written of the story "Her characters walked straight out of 1940s Mississippi and into the part of my brain where sympathy and anger and love reside, leaving my heart racing. They are with me still.") You can see reader reactions elsewhere on the characterizations and the plot line, so I'm not going to summarize them here.  I will only say, as Kingsolver and others have, this is a tale and a set of characters likely to stay with me, which is not a comment I make about many novels -- a few insightful ideas are about what I demand of an author.

 

The novel was published by Algonquin Books; it was awarded the 2006 Bellwether Prize (established by Barbara Kingsolver about 2000), recognizing an unpublished manuscript promoting social responsibility,

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellwether_Prize


This is the book I am planning for my next read!  I think what brought it to the forefront for me is that the author just released a new book, one which I don't think I would be interested in, but it made me realize that I still hadn't read her first book.


Laura -- Hope you find the time worthwhile as I did!  When you are done, you may find it interesting to scan the reader reviews.  I did. The name of her new book is in my text above.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading

Thanks Debbie!  I appreciate that!


dhaupt wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

Camp Nine  


Ryan, thanks for sharing your review and for taking time out of your schedule to visit the forum. I appreciate it and look forward to your reviews here and I also read them on your blog

Thanks again




"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading

Pepper, Thank you.  If you or your friend read the book, which I really did love, I hope youlet me know what you thought of it.


Peppermill wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

This is the review I posted on the blog:

 

Have I ever told you guys how much I love my sense of humor.  It tends to lean towards the darker side of things, which is why I find some circumstances funnier than most will.  I guess a perfect example, a short one anyway, is from the movie Titanic.  I'm sure you know which one I'm talking about, though I didn't really enjoy it that much.  There is one moment that cracks me up every time I see it though.  When the boat is sinking, tail end up in the air, passengers start to fall like confetti.  There is one in particular that makes me laugh out loud, I know it's callous but sorry.  It's the guy who falls and hits the propeller blade, the thunking sounds he makes sends me into stitches.  Now you might say I'm morbid, but it will give you an insight into why I loved this book so much.

I'm not saying that I laughed out loud the entire time I was reading it, because I didn't.  But I did find a lot of it humorous enough to say this was one of the most entertaining books I've read in a long time.  Jean is one of those rare characters that I love despite everything that she does.  She is a woman lost in pain who decides on being practical for the first time in her life.  Unfortunately for her friends, that means killing them off before they grow old and suffer in the way her mother did.

It was a joy and a thrill to to watch the internal conflict as she meandered her way and started knocking of those closest to her.  The only stipulation is that she has to make them as happy as she can before she does it.  In once case that involves sleeping with the one that has had a thing for her since college.  I love the way Jean is able to twist herself in an elaborate pretzel in order to justify what she is doing.  Much like Serial Mom and those college kids from The Last Supper, Jean starts off doing what she thinks is right and just.  For the most part, she is firm in that thinking by the end as well.  She has her moments of doubt, but all it takes is remembering the pain and suffering her mother went through for Jean to realize she is on the right path no matter the consequences to herself.

This was a wonderfully complex and inspired look at friendship and morality in an age where both things seem to be expendable.   The author, through dark humor and brilliant writing, was able to bring Jean and her friends to life in such a way that made me want to be Jean's friend, despite the risk.

 


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

Practical Jean  by Trevor Cole



Wow, that's definitely an original plot! I know the perfect person to recommend this to. LOL! Can't wait to hear your opinion of it.


Thanks for posting your review here, Ryan, especially since I don't have  yours or really any other book review blogs on my regular scan list!

 

Just listened to the Great Course's take on Crime and Punishment.  Your review makes Practical Jean sound like a 2011 version (perhaps a sitcom rip?), i.e., decent person committing crime towards "good" purposes!




"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading

mo

Motor City Shakedown  

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Currently Reading


pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

Practical Jean  



Wow, that's definitely an original plot! I know the perfect person to recommend this to. LOL! Can't wait to hear your opinion of it.





Ryan -- pjpick is the person with the friend to whom she intends to recommend this. 

 

I do still need to check if this is in my library system.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading

LOL...That's what I get for trying to respond while I'm eating and listening to music


Peppermill wrote:

pjpick wrote:

Ryan_G wrote:

Practical Jean  



Wow, that's definitely an original plot! I know the perfect person to recommend this to. LOL! Can't wait to hear your opinion of it.





Ryan -- pjpick is the person with the friend to whom she intends to recommend this. 

 

I do still need to check if this is in my library system.




"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Inspired Wordsmith
kimba88
Posts: 790
Registered: ‎01-05-2011
0 Kudos
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Currently Reading


kimba88 wrote:

The Secret of Lies  


hi Kimba, this one looks good. I'll be watching for your review.