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pjpick
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WWII Fiction

I love WWII Fiction and would love to hear some of your favorite choices for fiction set in this time period. Here are a couple of mine.

Night of Flames Story told from the Resistance view in Russia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society Picture painted via letters of the German occupation of the Channel Islands.

  

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Peppermill
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Re: WWII Fiction

[ Edited ]

I enjoyed these two First Look choices, the first set in WWI, the second in WWII:

 

 

The House at Riverton  by Kate Morton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Postmistress  by Sarah Blake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These were pretty light on the wars themselves, but they had especially interesting tidbits on the perspectives from the homeland as well as some of the civilians involved.

 

The Madonnas of Leningrad  by Debra Dean

                               This one gave a sense of the awful seige of Leningrad

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pjpick
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Re: WWII Fiction

Pep, all excellent choices! (although can only attest to seeing the movie Corelli's Mandolin). Just recently read "The Postmistress" too.

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basson_mommy12
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Re: WWII Fiction

 

Eye of the Needle  Spy novel by a master storyteller.  Excellent!

 

"The Answer to the Great Question of ... Life, the Universe and Everything ... (is) 42." -- Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"

Ruth W.
Grand Rapids, MI
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pjpick
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Re: WWII Fiction

basson_mommy12 wrote:

 

Eye of the Needle  Spy novel by a master storyteller.  Excellent!

 

 

I totally forget about Ken Follet! I haven't read Eye of the Needle but have read three others. I really enjoyed:

Jackdaws 

 

 

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dhaupt
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Re: WWII Fiction

Oh I would also suggest Kristan Hannah's new book 

 

 

 

Winter Garden 

 

It's not a hard core war story but rather how it destroys lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also

The Postmistress 

 

 

Is an excellent choice. Sarah's novel was wonderful

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Peppermill
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Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: WWII Fiction

 

 

The Winds of War  by Herman Wouk

 

Has anyone here read this and is willing to comment?  I picked up a copy today from the Library used books for sale shelf.  The little time I spent perusing it suggested that, while it is lengthy (800+ pages), it is also a gossipy novel as well as a source of much information about the time leading up to WWII.  I couldn't tell how much it deals with the war after America entered it.

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pjpick
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Re: WWII Fiction

Haven't read it but saw the mini-series about 3-4 decades ago. Don't remember too much about it accept there were lots of intertwining love stories. Based on a family, I believe.

Peppermill wrote:

 

 

The Winds of War  by Herman Wouk

 

Has anyone here read this and is willing to comment?  I picked up a copy today from the Library used books for sale shelf.  The little time I spent perusing it suggested that, while it is lengthy (800+ pages), it is also a gossipy novel as well as a source of much information about the time leading up to WWII.  I couldn't tell how much it deals with the war after America entered it.

 

Pepper

 

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nhbookfan
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Registered: ‎02-08-2009

Re: WWII Fiction

Since you like WWII era books, I am currently reading "The Piano Teacher" and it is set in Hong Kong when the Japaneses first invaded.

The Piano Teacher 

 

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pjpick
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Re: WWII Fiction

nhbookfan wrote:

Since you like WWII era books, I am currently reading "The Piano Teacher" and it is set in Hong Kong when the Japaneses first invaded.

The Piano Teacher 

 

I've seen this one around but had no clue that it was a WWII book. I was sort of turned off by the title and never picked it up. I think I'll have to reconsider! Thanks!

 

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nhbookfan
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Re: WWII Fiction

no problem. I didn't really know what I was getting into, because the first part of the book jumps back and forth between twot different times, but right now it's all about the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong. Pretty interesting to see it from a different point of view other than the Germans or any of the troops which is what all the books I've ever read dealing with WWII have been about.

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JL_Garner
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Re: WWII Fiction

[ Edited ]

 

Peppermill wrote:

 

 

The Winds of War  by Herman Wouk

 

Has anyone here read this and is willing to comment?  I picked up a copy today from the Library used books for sale shelf.  The little time I spent perusing it suggested that, while it is lengthy (800+ pages), it is also a gossipy novel as well as a source of much information about the time leading up to WWII.  I couldn't tell how much it deals with the war after America entered it.

 

Pepper

 

 

Here's the bookseller recommendation I wrote for Wouk's Winds/Remembrance duology.

 

In answer to your question, The Winds of War only covers up through Pearl Harbor; War and Remembrance, which was actually Wouk's main story -- Winds is merely the prologue -- picks up immediately after, and ends with the bombing of Hiroshima.

 

I've read both novels and seen the corresponding miniseries several times. They are 'gossipy' in the sense that Wouk uses his fictional characters -- the extended Henry and Jastrow families -- to tell the story, and it is a big epic family drama like those that were popular in the 70s and 80s (e.g., North and South, The Thorn Birds). But that shouldn't discount the awesome level of historical research which went into the writing of these two novels. Wouk began working on them in 1962, and published Winds in 1971, and Remembrance in 1978, so he spent a great deal of time getting things as right as he could.

 

It's been a couple of weeks since you posted; how are you liking it so far?

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Peppermill
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Re: WWII Fiction

[ Edited ]

It's been a couple of weeks since you posted; how are you liking it so far?

 

JL -- thx for your comments and the link to your blog on Herman Wouk's The Winds of War and War and Remembrance.

 

Unfortunately, Winds is likely to remain on my TBR pile for awhile because I have too many other things going at the moment.  But, I am still glad I took advantage of the sale. Maybe Remembrance will eventually show up, either there or at our annual community book sale.  Or, maybe I will get so hooked, it will be a purchase!

 

By North and South, I presume that you are not referring to Gaskell's book, being discussed on LbW in May?   More likely, North and South by John Jakes?

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pjpick
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Re: WWII Fiction

Coventry  Has anyone out there read this one? I've just ordered it and was curious.

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Peppermill
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Re: WWII Fiction

The title is intriguing.  I had not heard of it before. 

 

What prompted you to order it, pjpick?

 

pjpick wrote:

Coventry  Has anyone out there read this one? I've just ordered it and was curious.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pjpick
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Re: WWII Fiction

I saw it posted on one of the threads here a while back and then it came up as one of the "if you liked___________, you may like ______________" on another webisite. I think it was in response to the Postmistress? I can't be sure. Anyway, the Goodreads reviews were favorable so I thought I would give it a try.

 

Peppermill wrote:

The title is intriguing.  I had not heard of it before. 

 

What prompted you to order it, pjpick?

 

pjpick wrote:

Coventry  Has anyone out there read this one? I've just ordered it and was curious.

 

 

 

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JL_Garner
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Re: WWII Fiction

 

Peppermill wrote:

It's been a couple of weeks since you posted; how are you liking it so far?

 

JL -- thx for your comments and the link to your blog on Herman Wouk's The Winds of War and War and Remembrance.

 

Unfortunately, Winds is likely to remain on my TBR pile for awhile because I have too many other things going at the moment.  But, I am still glad I took advantage of the sale. Maybe Remembrance will eventually show up, either there or at our annual community book sale.  Or, maybe I will get so hooked, it will be a purchase!

 

By North and South, I presume that you are not referring to Gaskell's book, being discussed on LbW in May?   More likely, North and South by John Jakes?

 

I did mean the John Jakes novel, yes.

 

I totally understand your putting Winds aside for the time being. Both novels are a big time committment, but totally worth the effort. It took me about a year to read them both, although I did read some other books on the side. I actually have two copies of each; the 2002 trade paperback reprints that I bought at my B&N, and old hardback copies that I picked up at the library book sale. It's one of those books I don't mind having duplicates of, though. :smileywink:

 

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Peppermill
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Re: WWII Fiction

Pjpick -- please do let us know what you think.

 

 

pjpick wrote:

I saw it posted on one of the threads here a while back and then it came up as one of the "if you liked___________, you may like ______________" on another webisite. I think it was in response to the Postmistress? I can't be sure. Anyway, the Goodreads reviews were favorable so I thought I would give it a try.

 

Peppermill wrote:

The title is intriguing.  I had not heard of it before. 

 

What prompted you to order it, pjpick?

 

pjpick wrote:

Coventry  Has anyone out there read this one? I've just ordered it and was curious.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
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Re: WWII Fiction

[ Edited ]

This one apparently isn't available in the United States yet (except through secondary booksellers) and I am scratching my head trying to remember how I came across its review in the UK Telegraph:

 

 Chocolate Cake with Hitler by Emma Craigie, reviewed in the UK Telegraph.

 

The comments are almost as interesting as the review, if that is the proper term for something written by the author herself.  Here is an excerpt from the article:

 

"It was the loneliness of the 12-year-old that first drew me to Helga Goebbels. She was the oldest of the six children taken by their parents, Joseph and Magda Goebbels, into Hitler's Berlin bunker on April 22 1945. Their tale had barely been written about and had never been the subject of a book. I decided to tell their story from Helga's point of view. My breakthrough was the discovery of an untranslated memoir of their governess, Kathe Hubner, who worked for the Goebbels family for the last two years of the Second World War.

 

"Faced with the inevitability of defeat, Goebbels, the Nazi Propaganda Minister, had determined to await defeat and death alongside the Fuhrer. Other leading Nazis had protected their children by sending them into the mountains or out of the country, but Magda Goebbels decided that she and the children would join her husband to bring their lives to what she called 'the only possible and honourable conclusion'."

 

Does anyone here know the movie Downfall, which at least two of the comments mention, one suggesting that it covers this same story with little need for another? 

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pjpick
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Re: WWII Fiction

nhbookfan wrote:

Since you like WWII era books, I am currently reading "The Piano Teacher" and it is set in Hong Kong when the Japaneses first invaded.

The Piano Teacher 

 

About halfway through this one. Not bad!