Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
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Re: Community Room

There's not a single avatar for an older man sitting quietly with his cup of tea by his side, his cat on his lap, and a book in his hand.  They seem mostly to be drawn by young people who see anybody old as either decrepit or weird.

 


Thayer wrote:
What does everyone think of the new "avatars?" I personally don't think there is enough variety of design. Any thoughts?

 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
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Re: Community Room

The other thing they could do would to be to have avatar portraits of authors.   I would be happy switching around among a bust of Homer and portraits of Milton, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Lamb, Austen, and so on.  Those would be much more appropriate to a reading group than what they offer now. 
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
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Re: Community Room

Our Mutual Friend is much darker than most of Dickens, but rich in characters.   I haven't been in London for decades, but for a long time I ordered books by mail from a little bookstore in London that found me all sorts of great second hand books at very affordable prices, even with postage.   But the Internet wiped out many of those little bookstores, and my beloved Compton Book Shop, sadly, is no longer. But the books are all here, so it lives on still on my shelves.

 

 I haven't read The Suspicions of Mr. Wichert -- in fact, I've never heard of it, and the Barnes and Noble Bookstore doesn't recognize the title.  Oh, wait -- I see it's Wicher, not Wichert.  Stupid computer couldn't tell that.  Do let us know what you think of it when it's moved from your TBR to your RN (reading now) pile!

 


HannibalCat wrote:

Everyman wrote:

Hi everyone, what have you been reading lately or since the last First Look?

 

Currently reading:

 

Dickens, Our Mutual Friend

Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho (for LfW board here)

Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (for another on-line book club, re-reading)

Trollope, Dr. Thorne

Frost, Complete Poems

American Short Stories (for Classics group here)

 

 

Recently finished:

Trollope Barchester Towers (re-reading)

Shakespeare Love's Labors Lost (for Shakespeare group here) and related criticism (Goddard, Coleridge,  van Doren, Bloom, and others)

Trollope, Marion Fay

Ngaio Marsh, Artists in Crime and others (for Mystery club here)

many others


Hi everyman. I am currently reading Sherlock Holmes and Our Mutual Friend. I have not seen anyone even admit they read Our Mutual Friend, but I got hooked on Dickens when I was in high school and had to read Great Expectations. I was in London a few years ago and went to the book store street, I can't remember the name of the street, and I bought The Old Curiosity Shop. What a treat! 
I kept trying to imagine London as Dickens saw it. I did not succeed very well. but when I read his stories I can picture it as clear as if I was watching it on the big screen.
 I have The Suspicions of Mr. Wichert in my TBR pile. Have you read it? What did you think if you did.
Look forward to the discussion on A Fortunate Age. See you online.
Cathy 

 


 

 

 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Melissa_W
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Re: Community Room

Excellent!  I second that idea :smileyhappy:


Everyman wrote:
The other thing they could do would to be to have avatar portraits of authors.   I would be happy switching around among a bust of Homer and portraits of Milton, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Lamb, Austen, and so on.  Those would be much more appropriate to a reading group than what they offer now. 


 

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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bookloverjb85
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Re: Community Room

I thought it was going to be a teen romance or something too.  It has a little bit of that, but it is so well written and the story and plot is interesting, so much so that you just want to keep reading and don't think about the "teen" part anymore.
--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
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HannibalCat
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Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

Our Mutual Friend is much darker than most of Dickens, but rich in characters.   I haven't been in London for decades, but for a long time I ordered books by mail from a little bookstore in London that found me all sorts of great second hand books at very affordable prices, even with postage.   But the Internet wiped out many of those little bookstores, and my beloved Compton Book Shop, sadly, is no longer. But the books are all here, so it lives on still on my shelves.

 

 I haven't read The Suspicions of Mr. Wichert -- in fact, I've never heard of it, and the Barnes and Noble Bookstore doesn't recognize the title.  Oh, wait -- I see it's Wicher, not Wichert.  Stupid computer couldn't tell that.  Do let us know what you think of it when it's moved from your TBR to your RN (reading now) pile!

 


 

So sad about all the little book stores going out of business. Many years ago, before "Friends," my husband and I were talking about opening one that had a coffee shop with it. We could never get to the point where we could actually afford to do it, but I wish I could have. However, the idea did catch on. But so many have bit the dust. The internet does have its good points and its bad.

I will surely let you know how Mr. Wicher is when I get to it. I think it's 3rd in line.

See you on line,

Cathy

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DSaff
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Re: Community Room

I got an early Christmas present - the first three books of the "Twilight" saga arrived yesterday! After being on an infinite waiting list for the books, I figured I would ask for them. LOL I am a big Harry Potter fan (own all the books and DVD's). Will "Twilight" do the same thing to me? We will see. :smileyvery-happy:


Tarri wrote:
I bought the first two books in the Twilight series and also The Host, but I'm afraid that once I read them I will be Harry Potter obsessed so they are on the television shelf calling my name. 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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bookloverjb85
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Re: Community Room (Everyman)

Everyman,

I was talking to you in the other thread (How to get your free reading copy...) and I took your advice and moved to this thread so that they didn't kick us out (haha).  I looked for the book you mentioned "The Book Bag" by Somerset Maugham.  Anywhere I looked they were selling it for hundreds of dollars.  Do you know of anywhere I could find it for less?  I am going to try and look at the library, but it seems like an older book so I am not sure if they will have it.

--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
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KxBurns
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Re: Community Room


pedsphleb wrote:

Excellent!  I second that idea :smileyhappy:


Everyman wrote:
The other thing they could do would to be to have avatar portraits of authors.   I would be happy switching around among a bust of Homer and portraits of Milton, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Lamb, Austen, and so on.  Those would be much more appropriate to a reading group than what they offer now. 


 


 

I agree - great idea!
Reader 2
cKid
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Re: Community Room

bookloverjb85--

 

I am assuming that you were replying to my post. If so, thank you for the feedback. I guess I will give it a go, Twilight saga, I mean.

Moderator
KxBurns
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Re: Community Room

Hi everyone,

Just wanted to let you know that the discussion schedule has been posted in the News, Schedules & Updates thread!

 

-Karen

Distinguished Correspondent
Thayer
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Re: Community Room

As we prepare to begin our January discussion, my thoughts go to author, Joanna Smith Rakoff. I wonder how she is feeling as her proverbial "baby" has now been introduced and it about to be pondered by readers, such as we. She is, undoubtedly, as anxious to begin as we are. Kudos to her for her courage and her willingness to share her passion with us!
~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
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Re: Community Room

I echo your thoughts. 

The hands must surely be damp!

Thayer wrote:
As we prepare to begin our January discussion, my thoughts go to author, Joanna Smith Rakoff. I wonder how she is feeling as her proverbial "baby" has now been introduced and it about to be pondered by readers, such as we. She is, undoubtedly, as anxious to begin as we are. Kudos to her for her courage and her willingness to share her passion with us!

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
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Re: Community Room (Everyman)

The Book Bag is just a story, should be in most collections of his stories. 

 

I looked on the B&N site.  Dover has a cheap collection "Rain and other stories," but they don't say what else is in it.   Everyman has a Collected Stories which has 31 stories, but again doesn't say which ones.   Penguin has a four volume collected short stories, but it doesn't look like volumes 1 and 4 are in print.  I have a two volume edition of his short stories which I can't give you the details of because my wife has our grandchildren alseep in the stroller right in front of the shelf it's on, of course. 

 

I suggest that you ask your librarian to find a copy for you either in their collection or in interlibrary loan that has The Book Bag in it.   Good librarians love that sort of request -- it gives them a chance actually to use some of the reference skills they studied for so many years.  

 

According to a Google Book page I found, The Book Bag is included in Great English Short Stories  selected by Isherwood, Dell Publishing Company, 1957.  So maybe your librarian can get that particular volume.  There's a current book of the same name on B&N, but probably not the same set of stories.  But I see that B&N offers fifteen copies of the Isherwood collection through their used book section, starting at $1.99.  

 

By the way, the story isn't really that much about books as it is a typical Maugham story, but the book bag plays an interesting role, and his comments on people who are addicted to books are amusing.  

 

Most of Maugham's stories are well worth reading.  Most people know his Of Human Bondage and sometimes The Moon and Sixpence, Cakes and Ale, or The Razor's Edge, but his stories may be, I think, his best contribution to literature.

 

There is, by the way, an interesting story of his birth. His parents were living in France at the time, and French law provided that anybody born on French soil could be conscripted into the French army.  To save his son from this possibility, his father arranged to have him born in the English embassy building, which was technically English soil.   He had an interseting life: in WWI he was an ambulance driver for the British Red Cross in the Literary Ambulance Drivers unit, which included Hemingway, E.E. Cummings, and other literary figures.  He spent some time as a spy for England, which was the basis for his Ashenden stories. 

 

oops, grandchild sitting calls, got to go.

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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bookloverjb85
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Re: Community Room (Everyman)

Thank you for that information Everyman.  I will definitely look into those suggestions.  I will go to the library and see if they can get it for me.  I am going to try and get another one of his books as well and read those.  You know a lot about him and I enjoy finding out about authors pasts and how they are intertwined in their stories.
--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
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DebsScott
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What we're reading and other points...

* I'm currently enjoying The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  It's a story of a young girl growing up in Nazi Germany and her love for the written word.

 

* I have read all of the Twilight series (and am a HUGE Harry Potter fan) and I love Nora Roberts too.  I finished Pagan Stone right before I picked up The Book Thief.  I can and will read just about anything from any genre.

 

* I cannot even begin to imagine how Ms. Smith Rakoff is feeling knowing her book is coming under our critical eyes.  She has a tremendous amount of courage and my hat's off to her for being brave enough to not only just submit a manuscript for publication but for sharing it in this forum.

 

* Dawn, you know me...do you see one SINGLE avatar that even REMOTELY looks like me?  Okay, maybe the witch one...but she doesn't have red hair!  None of them do!  Oh well...

~Debs~
"And now Harry, let us go out into the night and pursue that flighty temptress, adventure."
~Professor Albus Dumbledore
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minutiae
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Re: Community Room


Tarri wrote:
Hi everyone, what have you been reading lately or since the last First Look?  I just finished the latest J.A. Jance Web book, but lately it's been short *cozy* mysteries.  I have so many knitting projects to do that if I get caught up in a long book I'll never be ready for the holidays. 

 

This is my first experience with First Look, but I've read the following books in the last few weeks (my rating, out of 4 stars):

 

-The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Steig Larsson (***1/2)

-White Teeth, Zadie Smith (**1/2)

-Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History, Ted Sorensen (****)

-Berlin, Pierre Frei (**1/2)

-I Was Told There Would Be Cake, Sloane Crosley (**1/2)

-Twilight, Stephenie Meyer (*)

 

Next on the shelf are:

-Thunderstruck, Erik Larson (I loved The Devil in the White City)

-Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You, Sam Gosling

-The Ghosts of Berlin: Confronting German History in the Urban Landscape, Brian Ladd

 

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bookloverjb85
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Re: What we're reading and other points...

I read The Book Thief and I loved it.  I hope you are enjoying it.
--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
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DSaff
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Re: What we're reading and other points...

I loved "The Book Thief." It was well written and thought provoking.


DebsScott wrote:

* I'm currently enjoying The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  It's a story of a young girl growing up in Nazi Germany and her love for the written word.

 

* I have read all of the Twilight series (and am a HUGE Harry Potter fan) and I love Nora Roberts too.  I finished Pagan Stone right before I picked up The Book Thief.  I can and will read just about anything from any genre.

 

* I cannot even begin to imagine how Ms. Smith Rakoff is feeling knowing her book is coming under our critical eyes.  She has a tremendous amount of courage and my hat's off to her for being brave enough to not only just submit a manuscript for publication but for sharing it in this forum.

 

* Dawn, you know me...do you see one SINGLE avatar that even REMOTELY looks like me?  Okay, maybe the witch one...but she doesn't have red hair!  None of them do!  Oh well...


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
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Re: Earlier First Look Book

Since The Mighty Queens of Freeville  board is no longer directly available, I decided to make this post here.  Those of you who read it (and others) may find the column that appeared in today's on-line Washington Post of interest.
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy