Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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chris227
Posts: 111
Registered: ‎12-02-2008
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Re: Community Room

I just finished The Story of Edgar Sawtelle, Twilight, and Escape by Carolyn Jessop.  Currently I'm reading Love in the Time of Cholera, Crime and Punishment, and am about to start the second book in the Twilight series - I don't know why but Stephanie Meyers has me hooked!  My husband thinks I'm crazy but I can't stick to just one book at a time (maybe it's all the multi-tsking I do at work creeping into the rest of my life!). I'll read just about everything and try to mix up new releases and classics.
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DebsScott
Posts: 245
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What we're reading and other points...


bookloverjb85 wrote:
I read The Book Thief and I loved it.  I hope you are enjoying it.

 

It has definitely become one of my favorites.  It made me laugh and cry...and I just love Death's dry humor (Death narrates the book).
~Debs~
"And now Harry, let us go out into the night and pursue that flighty temptress, adventure."
~Professor Albus Dumbledore
Inspired Correspondent
bookloverjb85
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎10-12-2007
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Re: What we're reading and other points...


DebsScott wrote:

bookloverjb85 wrote:
I read The Book Thief and I loved it.  I hope you are enjoying it.

 

It has definitely become one of my favorites.  It made me laugh and cry...and I just love Death's dry humor (Death narrates the book).

I remember when I first realized that the narrator was Death, I was like "Wait a minute, what?"  Death being the narrator makes sense and makes for an interesting reading of the book.

--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
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dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room


chris227 wrote:
I just finished The Story of Edgar Sawtelle, Twilight, and Escape by Carolyn Jessop.  Currently I'm reading Love in the Time of Cholera, Crime and Punishment, and am about to start the second book in the Twilight series - I don't know why but Stephanie Meyers has me hooked!  My husband thinks I'm crazy but I can't stick to just one book at a time (maybe it's all the multi-tsking I do at work creeping into the rest of my life!). I'll read just about everything and try to mix up new releases and classics.
How did you like The Story of Edgar Sawtelle, I just couldn't get into it. The writing was wonderful but I just didn't like the story, and for me it's all about the story.

 

Contributor
ginger81
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎01-29-2007
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Re: Community Room

Great! I love Nora Roberts, also. I am almost finished with The Pagan Stone. I have really enjoyed this series!

Has anyone read The Shack?

Ginger Williams

GW
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


I have stayed up all night or until 4:00 a.m. on work nights to finish a book or just a couple more chapters.  I wish I could list some of the books, but the only one I can think of off the top of my head is Atonement.  I've never missed a meeting or appointment because of reading, but I'm sure there were many where I could have been more awake. 

 

I hate snow.

Frequent Contributor
fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


I have never skipped a meal or an appointment, but I have stayed up late to finish a book.  I enjoy reading, but would not let a book take over my life.

MG

Distinguished Wordsmith
aprilh
Posts: 424
Registered: ‎09-25-2008
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


 

Last week I stayed up late every night reading The Hour I First Believed. I'd fall asleep, then wake up in the middle of the night thinking about the characters in the book. Well, after that I couldn't sleep so I spent a couple more hours reading. It was an exhausting week!
April
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DariaFreeman
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎12-03-2008
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Re: Community Room

Thank you Eman and everyone. I appreciate the guidance of vetran "First Lookers". Now that the schedule is up, I am ready to delve into my first chapters. I am going to try and read along with the schedule. This shouldn't be too hard, since I often read three books at once. I tend to read books like I would watch TV series' An episode at at time. You asked if there was one book that really made me stay up late for.....I have to say the only one so far was "Tuesdays with Morrie" I loved that book. I read it straight through one night, before I even knew it.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- "WOW-- What a Ride! Thanks, God!"
Inspired Correspondent
bookloverjb85
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎10-12-2007
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


I have definitely stayed up late at night to read a book.  There have been times when I have put off eating a meal to finish a chapter of a book or to keep reading.  I have to say thought that I have never missed anything really important to read a book, even though there are times that I wish I could.

--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
Distinguished Correspondent
Shadowwolf36
Posts: 76
Registered: ‎09-16-2008
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Re: Community Room

I have found myself staying up much later than normal (including not sleeping at all) to finish a book. The Kite Runner was like this and The Davinci Code -- I brought it to work and read it and didn't work so I could get it finished.....
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,865
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


Great question eman, I always look to you our resident "wise man" to ask the really pertinent questions and always enjoy reading the responses.
I have stayed up late reading, but to miss out on an appointment or meeting never, and I consider myself a readaholic. 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Community Room


DariaFreeman wrote:

Hello all,

 

  I am re-reading Pride and Prejudice.  I was spurned into doing so by watching a movie called the Jane Austin Book Club. It was a really lovely movie. It made me want to read all her books again as well. I am also reading Tales of a Continental Drifter. I really love books by travel writers. Especially if they impart wit and humor. There is no better person on the planet than Bill Bryson for for this skill. I recommend every last one of his books.

 

Daria


 

Daria -- do you include Bruce Chatwin (e.g., In Patagonia ) and Paul Theroux (e.g.,  Dark Star Safari ) among the travel writers you enjoy? 

 

If you like travel writers and don't know their work, I suggest trying each of them -- each has a number of possibilities.  Also, I enjoyed The Places in Between by Rory Stewart (tramping through Afghanistan). 

 

Women whose work I haven't read, but that have been mentioned on the Women's Literature board, include Beryl Markham: West with the Night  and Travels in West Africa by Mary Kingsley.

 

I would submit that at least one of these writers should give Bill Bryson a run for his money as "no better person on the planet for this skill" -- of imparting wit and humor.  (I enjoy Bryson; nonetheless, my reaction to his writing is a bit more subdued than yours, Daria.  However, the humor of each of the writers I mention may not be as out front as that of Bryson.)

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Women whose work I haven't read, but that have been mentioned on the Women's Literature board, include Beryl Markham: West with the Night  and Travels in West Africa by Mary Kingsley.

 

 

Both excellent books.  

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


I'm afraid reading (and computing) too often consumes my time beyond the "rational", although the phrase "couldn't put it down" is one I seldom use and, when I do, it probably is, strictly speaking, hyperbole.

 

The one book that I will always put in that category as my measure of an engrossing read is The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough.  I had started it on a flight into Denver for a business meeting, read it through dinner at the hotel that night and well into the early morning, finishing it on the return flight to EWR.   Somehow, I got through the work required in between.  I couldn't tell now what made TTB so gripping, but at the time, so many long years ago, it was.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Timbuktu2
Posts: 528
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


I have read books that I "couldn't put down".  I've stayed up late, and of course it's possible to eat dinner while reading.  I wouldn't miss an important meeting or anything else where others are counting on me.  But there have been times when a book almost feels like a compulsion and it's a real fight to get away from it.  This usually happens when i'm over half way done.  A momentum builds and I can't wait to see where the story ends.
 
 Then, there's the book that stays with you, even when you do "put it down".  Most great books, I find, are always there, in my mind.  Everything I see and hear relates.  So in a sense, even though I've put it down physically, my mind hasn't let go.  

 

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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]

Timbuktu2 wrote:  Then, there's the book that stays with you, even when you do "put it down".  Most great books, I find, are always there, in my mind.  Everything I see and hear relates.  So in a sense, even though I've put it down physically, my mind hasn't let go. 

 

That's a really great point.  

 

And the parts that rise to one's mind at various times tend to change over time.  As does the way we read these books each time.  For example, I'm re-reading Tess of D'Urbervilles (for the Classics book club here) for at least the third time, and finding things and thoughts in it I had never noticed before.   (What are they?  Tune in to the Classics discussion in January to find out!)

Message Edited by Everyman on 12-18-2008 04:45 PM
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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PinkBaby
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎09-03-2008
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Re: Community Room

i like the twilight books to. they are very addictive i have read the first and second books they are good.:smileyhappy:   what is funny  is their suppose to be for teenage age group.  but hey im old 50 yrs. old.:smileytongue:   and my boyfriend thinks im crazy because i read stories about vampires he doesnt see the appeal of it. but the main reason i read them is because they live forever and of course never grow old. but the down  side  is they suck blood yuck.:smileytongue:                           have fun reading them they are fun and quick read.:smileyhappy:
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Terrie
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎12-22-2007
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Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]

Everyman wrote:

People sometimes say of a book "I couldn't put it down."  And it always makes me wonder.  I'm sure it's a bit of hyperbole, but how much?

 

Have you ever skipped a meal, or an important meeting or appointment, because you were reading a book and couldn't put it down until you had finished?  Have you ever stayed up at least two hours past your normal bedtime because a book so engrossed you that you couldn't go to bed before finishing it?  (And getting so tired that you quit before finishing doesn't count, because then you DID put it down!)

 

I've certainly read a lot of books that kept me deeply engaged, but never to the point that I disregarded a call to dinner or didn't get up to answer the doorbell when it rang or otherwise stuck with the book when a rational person would have put it down for some other important activity.  

 

What about you?


OH, YES! Definitely! I've skipped multiple meals, lost sleep before work, stayed up all night - drempt about the book - then picked it up again before going to work.  No, I didn't miss work (you have to work to buy the books - but I was awfully tired) and then counted the hours until I could get home and read again!!  Especially if I'm at the cusp of a book, everyone in my family just says they'll see me later as it does NOT get put down until I'm done.  That's when you know you have a really good book in your hands - it's passion to see what's next and nothing interferes!!

Message Edited by Terrie on 12-19-2008 01:19 AM
Carpe Diem!