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Contributor
Alexis_Gargagliano
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎12-23-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for the Editor

Hi there,

I'm so happy that you are finding yourself immersed in the novel. I agree about long books starting slowly and then getting under your skin--it is wonderful.  As for the publishing process--forgive me if I'm being obtuse, but do you mean big as in long, or big as in lots of attention paid?

 

ag 

 


detailmuse wrote:

Hi Alexis -- thanks for being here and bringing books for all of us. I'm just halfway through, had to press a bit to get this far but now in the middle of a very busy week, I find I'm thinking of the book all the time, can't wait to get back to it. I find that often with a long book -- it's slower to begin but then the immersion becomes lovely. And this is a long book, not so much in pages but in words. I'm wondering: what are the issues associated with acquiring, editing and marketing a big book these days?


 

 


Learn more about A Fortunate Age.
Correspondent
detailmuse
Posts: 180
Registered: ‎01-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for the Editor

Big as in long ... and even longer if the pages weren't so densely formatted. Don't both publishers and readers shy away from longer books?

 


Alexis_Gargagliano wrote:

Hi there,

I'm so happy that you are finding yourself immersed in the novel. I agree about long books starting slowly and then getting under your skin--it is wonderful.  As for the publishing process--forgive me if I'm being obtuse, but do you mean big as in long, or big as in lots of attention paid?

 

ag 

 


detailmuse wrote:

Hi Alexis -- thanks for being here and bringing books for all of us. I'm just halfway through, had to press a bit to get this far but now in the middle of a very busy week, I find I'm thinking of the book all the time, can't wait to get back to it. I find that often with a long book -- it's slower to begin but then the immersion becomes lovely. And this is a long book, not so much in pages but in words. I'm wondering: what are the issues associated with acquiring, editing and marketing a big book these days?


 

 

 

Contributor
Alexis_Gargagliano
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎12-23-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for the Editor

You'll probably get varied answers to this question. I do think you are right that we are at a moment when short books, often with lower prices, have a wide appeal. That said, there are always exceptions, like Edgar Sawtelle, and in the end a good book is a good book no matter the page count. I believe that a book should be as long as it needs to be. I don't think Joanna could have pulled this off with 150 fewer pages. And, like you

detailmuse wrote:

Big as in long ... and even longer if the pages weren't so densely formatted. Don't both publishers and readers shy away from longer books?

 


Alexis_Gargagliano wrote:

Hi there,

I'm so happy that you are finding yourself immersed in the novel. I agree about long books starting slowly and then getting under your skin--it is wonderful.  As for the publishing process--forgive me if I'm being obtuse, but do you mean big as in long, or big as in lots of attention paid?

 

ag 

 


detailmuse wrote:

Hi Alexis -- thanks for being here and bringing books for all of us. I'm just halfway through, had to press a bit to get this far but now in the middle of a very busy week, I find I'm thinking of the book all the time, can't wait to get back to it. I find that often with a long book -- it's slower to begin but then the immersion becomes lovely. And this is a long book, not so much in pages but in words. I'm wondering: what are the issues associated with acquiring, editing and marketing a big book these days?


 

 

 


 

, I love the satisfaction of a long book that carries you along and immerses you in a world, but I do feel that every page of a book should be necessary, that the plot must sustain its verve and the characters must be rich enough to keep your attention and compel you.  


Learn more about A Fortunate Age.
Contributor
mshukers
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎01-01-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for the Editor

I have received and read the book A Fortunate Age but am not able to reply in the discussion. I appear to be lovked out. I must admit I did not really relate to the characters at all, maybe because I'm amall town/ country woman. Thanks, Mary