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michaela27
Posts: 234
Registered: ‎05-24-2009
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

Sam is an insecure person, thats why she does anything to be poplular and goes along with everything her friends do.  She used to be made fun of as a child, which makes it kind of worse that she treats others so horribly now since she knows how it feels.

 

Sam, Lidsay, Elody, and Ally definately each have kind of different personalities, and they all have things from thier past that make them the way they are.

 

I think that sam is not as mean as Lindsay, but she does fit in with the crowd because they really are her friends and she is going out with one of the hottest guys in school. although hes a douche.

 

Sams relationship with kent shows how insecure she is, and how far from herself she has gotten because she wants to be popular.  she would still be friends with kent if she didnt care so much about what other people think.

Correspondent
Tenrbe
Posts: 126
Registered: ‎11-05-2009

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

Sadly, I think that Sam is a sterotypical teenager. She doesn't realize what's really important in life, and instead attaches her happiness to materials and superficial things. She puts up a front and acts the way she thinks she's supposed to. She hides her true feelings and does things just to conform to a mold.

 

I'm not sure what Sam's relationship with Kent says about her. I think she definitely likes the attention, and maybe even needs it. She's connected to him because he knows her past, what she was really like before she became fake. I think she wants to keep him in her life as a reminder of who she once was, who she really is.

Frequent Contributor
Rebz
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎01-06-2010

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

What kind of person is Sam? What do we know about her family? Do we learn anything surprising about her as these first two chapters progress?

Sam is the typical popular high school girl. She's one of those girls I REALLY don't like...who think they are better than everyone esle.  We know very little about her family since she just kind of leaves....and doesn't interact with her family at all the first two mornings.  The only interaction with a family member is with her little sister, and she's even just a little put off by that too. We learn that Sam is incredibly shallow.

 

She and her friends go to great effort to fit in perfectly. How does Sam really fit in with this crowd?

I think physically Sam fits in simply because of her actions. But I don't think that she's reallyyyyy as horrible as she seems to be, deep down. There is definite potential for growth.

 

Do we learn things about each Lindsay, Ally and Elody that make them individual and not so cookie-cutter perfect?

Of course, they all have faults and secrets that they don't want anyone to find out.  No matter how "hot stuff" they think they are, they are human like everyone else. They want to be liked and admired and paid attention to.  They're rude and needy---just like you and me.

 

Lindsay's self proclaimed "theme song" is "No More Drama" by Mary J. Blige. Does this fit her?

I'm not really familiar with the song...so I can't say. But I mean, Lindsay soooo is the personification of drama. She likes to create drama...whether or not its to make it seem like there isn't any other drama outside of her drama is another story.

 

What does Sam's longstanding--although estranged--friendship with Kent tell you about her?

I think that Sam can only really count on Kent. He was there when her new friends  weren't.  You can tell he really cares about her and she about him, even if she doesn't necessarily show it.

 

If you were Sam, do you think there is one friend you would confide in when you woke up to start Friday the 12th over again?

Not sure if I'd hae the courage to confide it, but if I did and I absolutely had to tell someone it would probably be Kent.  I think he'd be the most understanding and caring than all of her other friends combined....they'd probably just think she was crazy and laugh it off. Just like they do to everything else.

-Becca
Contributor
pengy
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎01-06-2010

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

What kind of person is Sam? What do we know about her family? Do we learn anything surprising about her as these first two chapters progress? Sam, I find in my opinion from the beginning is kinda of a follower... I think she kind of just got pulled into being popular and didn't really notice untils he was finally popular and didn't think about it

 

She and her friends go to great effort to fit in perfectly. How does Sam really fit in with this crowd? Sam... She fits in but not really in a way shes kind of the odd ball

 

Do we learn things about each Lindsay, Ally and Elody that make them individual and not so cookie-cutter perfect? *sigh* They are quite a group and I find that Katie smokes and everyone gives her a hard time and then Lindsay can smoke and no one gives her a hard time.

 

Lindsay's self proclaimed "theme song" is "No More Drama" by Mary J. Blige. Does this fit her? Yesss and No I a way ill have to listen to the song to give a straight forward answer xD

 

What does Sam's longstanding--although estranged--friendship with Kent tell you about her? Kent I can tell see's through Sam and can feel her pain and is just very understanding

 

If you were Sam, do you think there is one friend you would confide in when you woke up to start Friday the 12th over again? I would choose Kent but she doesn't really talk to him sooo

єνєяуσηє тσℓ∂ мє тσ gяσωη υρ.... ι gяєω υρ αη∂ тнєη тнєу ωαηтє∂ мє тσ gяσωη ∂σωη...
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deannafrances
Posts: 77
Registered: ‎07-19-2008

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

I am a grandmother in my sixties and went to Catholic school and although I lived throught the beginning of hippiedom.  Are high schools really like they are protrayed in this book? does anyone ever learn anything?

It all seems so chaotic and anti education.

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LastWord
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

What kind of person is Sam? What do we know about her family? 

Sam is a girl who wasn't popular until Lindsay suddenly picks her out of the crowd. Their first act as friends is to humiliate another girl at a pool party. I appreciate the fact that the author portrays high school cliques in such a realistic way, and it's an interesting twist to make the protagonist the popular girl. In most YA books, the main character is the outcast, not the other way around. Still, the fact that Sam knows what it's like to be an outsider and chooses to be that mean makes her pretty unsympathetic. I found that watching Sam and her friends in action was like watching a car wreck. It's awful, but you can't turn away.

 

Except for a brief glimpse of Izzy, we don't find out much about Sam's family -- the author has made the decision to focus the bulk of the narrative on Sam's life at school. That's an interesting choice, because showing more of Sam's family life would make her more sympathetic. They're the ones who will be hardest hit by her death, and yet that doesn't seem like something the book will dwell on. Again, it's an interesting choice by the author, and I'm curious to see how it plays out.


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LastWord
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

 



I completely agree with flarglepuf's quote below. Yes, Sam might not get what was happening right off, but I couldn't help thinking the book was going to be pretty tedious if it went on like that for seven days. But then I kept reading ... and it didn't.


One more thing, and I know it's not the fault of either the character or the author, but I was incredibly annoyed by how clueless Sam was in the second chapter.  The fact that it took her until the end of the day to realize she was reliving the same day, when that was the first thing I knew about the story was just irking.


 

 


 

 

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Popper19
Posts: 199
Registered: ‎07-24-2007
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

What does Sam's longstanding--although estranged--friendship with Kent tell you about her?

I think it is showing us that there is hope for her to act like a decent person.

 

If you were Sam, do you think there is one friend you would confide in when you woke up to start Friday the 12th over again?

Definitely Kent.....

 

Although the poplular girls infuriated me and I wanted to smash their heads together after treating Juliet the way they did, I found the book to be extremely engaging.  I read the first two chapters without hardly looking up.

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Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

Vtc Wrote..Good point..if I say anymore,then it will be into Chapter 3.. i probably posted this before.."Kent"...  Vtc
LastWord wrote:

 



I completely agree with flarglepuf's quote below. Yes, Sam might not get what was happening right off, but I couldn't help thinking the book was going to be pretty tedious if it went on like that for seven days. But then I kept reading ... and it didn't.


One more thing, and I know it's not the fault of either the character or the author, but I was incredibly annoyed by how clueless Sam was in the second chapter.  The fact that it took her until the end of the day to realize she was reliving the same day, when that was the first thing I knew about the story was just irking.


 

 


 

 


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Frequent Contributor
GReba
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎07-24-2009

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

At this early point in the book, I am a bit peturbed by the fact that the focus seems to be on sex. I mean, I know that they are in high school and I know the value of having "done it" varied depending on the circles you ran in, but the main character (Samantha) is going to die and its portrayed thus far as the main thing that she'd miss out on if she died today....um, yeah...there are MANY other life experiences.

 

So my opinions on a few of the questions asked...

What kind of person is Sam? Somewhat shallow, but she falls into the still waters run deep category.  She mainly seems to go with her friends out of self-preservation...not necessarily agreement.

 

What do we know about her family? Seem to love her well enough, but there is distance.

 

She and her friends go to great effort to fit in perfectly. How does Sam really fit in with this crowd? Again, not so much.  I mean she's more about the "show", not about her actual substance.

 

Do we learn things about each Lindsay, Ally and Elody that make them individual and not so cookie-cutter perfect?  Yes, the author let's us see their flaws.....now whether the character sees them is another story.

 

Lindsay's self proclaimed "theme song" is "No More Drama" by Mary J. Blige. Does this fit her?  Umm, well I think she'd like it to, but until she does something to end the drama, it won't fully match.

 

What does Sam's longstanding--although estranged--friendship with Kent tell you about her? Back to the "all about the show"....she wouldn't still keep him tagging on unless she cared for him.

 

 

Look forward to chatting further as the book progresses! 

Contributor
dbug_13
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎07-03-2009

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

Lindsay's self proclaimed "theme song" is "No More Drama" by Mary J. Blige. Does this fit her?

 I think that this song fits Lindsay well. Although she at first glance appears very much in love with drama and wants to be the center of attention, I think that deep down there is a person who doessn't want to be caught up in everything, possibly due to experiencing too much drama throughout her life. She seems to put on a front that she doesn't care about anyone but herself, but she is truly hurting on the inside.

 

What does Sam's longstanding--although estranged--friendship with Kent tell you about her?

 Sam always wanted more in life, and when the opportunity to join the popular crowd presented itself, she seized it and never looked back. This meant leaving behind her old life, as well as her old friends, such as Kent. I think that Sam feels as though she has crossed a line and can never go back to her old, less popular ways. Therefore, she is trying to distance herself as much as possible from any part of her old life that threatens the new life she has worked so hard to achieve. However, I think that at least some part of her misses her old life with Kent, but she is too scared to acknowledge that part of herself.

If you were Sam, do you think there is one friend you would confide in when you woke up to start Friday the 12th over again? If I were Sam, I would definately confide in Kent. Kent seems to be genuine and compassionate and truly cares about Sam; I think that he might be the only person who wouldn't instantly write her off as delusional and mentally unstable if she told him about the situation.

Frequent Contributor
milkamilka
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎08-24-2009

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

What kind of person is Sam? What do we know about her family? Do we learn anything surprising about her as these first two chapters progress?

She is a girl I would HATE. She and her friends are just these "mean" girls who think they are perfect and everyone else are losers.

 

She and her friends go to great effort to fit in perfectly. How does Sam really fit in with this crowd? From outside she fits perfectly. Inside there are some factors which make her "outsider" but those are not shown to the outside people.

 

Do we learn things about each Lindsay, Ally and Elody that make them individual and not so cookie-cutter perfect? Definitely. And we get to know more and more when the book goes on.

 

Lindsay's self proclaimed "theme song" is "No More Drama" by Mary J. Blige. Does this fit her?

Totally! She is all about drama to draw attention to herself

 

What does Sam's longstanding--although estranged--friendship with Kent tell you about her?

Deep down, she liked him, but because her friends see him as loser she has to do so too.

 

If you were Sam, do you think there is one friend you would confide in when you woke up to start Friday the 12th over again?

I would not confide to Lindsey, Elody or Ally.

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

I guess I fell into what the author had planned. I disliked the girls. They are shallow and self-centered.

I do see hope if these girls have time to grow beyond this stage of their lives.

I see hope for Sam as she sees these girls for what they are, the good and the bad and the flaws in them.

 

I like a book that takes the reader through this emotional ride of disliking/liking a character. It is good that the writer involves the reader in that way and gets me involved in the character enough to care about disliking/liking. I have only read through Chapter 2. So I am ready for this ride that Sam's character is on.

pen21

Distinguished Correspondent
Lil_Irish_Lass
Posts: 163
Registered: ‎11-21-2008

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2


deannafrances wrote:

I am a grandmother in my sixties and went to Catholic school and although I lived throught the beginning of hippiedom.  Are high schools really like they are protrayed in this book? does anyone ever learn anything?

It all seems so chaotic and anti education.


 

As with any depiction of a sect of society it's only accurate from the narrator's perspective. However, I would say that yes, in many public schools there has been a decrease in the focus on education. There are too many forms of technology to distract students (iPods, cell phones, handheld video game systems) and a lack of structure at home (again very gross generalizations).

Children keep maturing faster as the decades go on and sex, drugs, and rock & roll are very prevalent in today's school systems where more teenagers are becoming sexually active at an alarmingly early age.

I graduated college in '99 and went to two very different high schools...the first being in a town in CT much like the on in BIF filled with wealthy, over privileged children who felt that they were untouchable. Though, because of the area, there was a high academic focus since my high school was nationally ranked for it's size. There was a lot of pressure from family, faculty, and the student body to do something to make yourself stand out (star athlete, brainiac, lead in the school play, etc). There were those who would sneak out in study hall to do drugs in the back parking lot, but for the most part there was a focus on organized learning. 

I then moved up to small town NH where in 1996 the high school was still functioning under the open classroom teaching styles from the 70's. The academic pressure there was to do what you had to do graduate (and faculty bent the rules to get people to pass as much as they could). A small portion of the student body was focused on their education, the rest were allowed to slack off and ignore it.

It all depends on the overall level of education in the community I think, if most of the adult generation didn't go to college (or graduate from high school) the present students will experience less of an educational focus than if the community is populated with adults who have at least an undergraduate degree.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"No sensible man ever engages, unprepared, in a fencing match of words with a woman." - The Woman in White
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

VtCozy wrote...Lauren does that well pen21,taking all of us on the emotional rollercoaster.that for me makes BIF  so on target..very tightly written,and wanting us to not judge..A very important factor.Thanks for bringing up the emotional piece. Vtc....
pen21 wrote:

I guess I fell into what the author had planned. I disliked the girls. They are shallow and self-centered.

I do see hope if these girls have time to grow beyond this stage of their lives.

I see hope for Sam as she sees these girls for what they are, the good and the bad and the flaws in them.

 

I like a book that takes the reader through this emotional ride of disliking/liking a character. It is good that the writer involves the reader in that way and gets me involved in the character enough to care about disliking/liking. I have only read through Chapter 2. So I am ready for this ride that Sam's character is on.

pen21


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Inspired Correspondent
jb70
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎07-06-2009
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Okay, I may ask this question again, when the author comes on, but until then, I was wondering, does anyone know how a book is designated for young adults? I realize the book is about teenagers and the problems they face, but it seems appropriate for a wider range of readers.

I have read several YA books and they all engaged me and did not seem to be written for a single audience...i.e, The Hunger Games, Chasing Fire, The Book Thief, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas...and now this, Before I Fall. All of these covered themes that could easily be enjoyed by older readers as well.
Is it because the main characters are young?
Is it simply easier to get published in this genre?
Is it about shelf space?
Does anyone know


I don't know if anyone else posted about this, I only got to the bottom of the first page so far but I wanted to post my thought on this and then I'll go back and keep going with the rest of the posts and add my own.  I am really not into the behavior of these characters.  I knwo smoking, drinking and premartial sex happens among high school students, but this book seems to be making it seem like to be among the popular crowd you have to do this.  Also, I think how popular these girls are might depend on how large the school was.  I know in high school we had an "in-crowd" but I never really cared about being a part of it.  I was invited to some of the parties, but not all, and that was fine by me.  The kids who get too into that status are the ones you run into years later who get fat and still think they are the best (I just read a book where that was the case called "Schooled in Lies" where a high school reunion commitee has some members of the in crowd who ten years later are still acting like they are better than everyone else).  I am wondering if Sam finally figures out how to change if she will still die at the end at the end of the last chapter (I haven't gotten to the end yet so this is not a spoiler just a thought).  I don't know that I would want a middle school student reading this book and isn't YA supposed to be 13 and up?


http://bookbookseverywhere.blogspot.com/
Inspired Correspondent
jb70
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎07-06-2009

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2


thewanderingjew wrote:

This book has raised lots of questions for me.

I know there are young adults reading this book. I wonder what they think of the parents in the book who seem to expect so little of their children, giving them fancy cars and “stuff” without the requisite instruction on responsibility.

Do the young adults out there want more or less discipline? How do the young adults think these kinds of situations arise? How do they think bullies can be stopped? What makes someone popular and what perpetuates their "mean" behavior? Why would people still "worship" these people even when they are mean?

What do they think of a parent who would allow them to be in a car driven by someone who is known to be careless and reckless, without intervening?

Why is casual sex treated like a contest? Would they like stricter moral and ethical rules?


I've wondered about the absence of parental involvement in other YA books too (like Hush, Hush if anyone else particiapated in that First Look).  I know my parents didn't know everything I did in high school but they always asked where I was going and gave me a time to come back and I never went out all night. 

 

The book also reminded of of what I remember of "Mean Girls" the movie with Lindsay Lohan as a girl who gets into the in crowd kind of like Sam gets into it.  Also I thought there were now laws on the books about how many passengers a young driver can have in the car to avoid situations like this but maybe those are still in the talking about phase.

http://bookbookseverywhere.blogspot.com/
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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2


Lil_Irish_Lass wrote:

deannafrances wrote:

I am a grandmother in my sixties and went to Catholic school and although I lived throught the beginning of hippiedom.  Are high schools really like they are protrayed in this book? does anyone ever learn anything?

It all seems so chaotic and anti education.

twj wrote:  ditto, i am from the same generation, a former teacher as well, and i am often aghast at the behavior i read about. what happened to discipline in schools and at home? aren't there any rules anymore that are sacrosanct? kids will always push the envelope but lately, kids seem to push all envelopes too far.


As with any depiction of a sect of society it's only accurate from the narrator's perspective. However, I would say that yes, in many public schools there has been a decrease in the focus on education. There are too many forms of technology to distract students (iPods, cell phones, handheld video game systems) and a lack of structure at home (again very gross generalizations).

twj wrote:  so, then, would you place the blame for all these distractions on the shoulders of the parents who purchase these "toys" for their kids without limits imposed or the schools for allowing them to be used there?


Children keep maturing faster as the decades go on and sex, drugs, and rock & roll are very prevalent in today's school systems where more teenagers are becoming sexually active at an alarmingly early age.
twj wrote: has sex education gone too far? does it now encourage sex rather than discourage it? is there too much "negative" social pressure, in the guise of positive behavior, placed on these young teens? i thought the original purpose of this kind of education was to prepare them for their futures, not to encourage them to sleep around but rather to explain the consequences as well. girls have become mattresses today.

of course, my generation was on the opposite side of the spectrum. we were raised a prudes. however, i have no complaints; it served me well. i am married 45 years to the same person and when i married i was a virgin and my honeymoon was magical. i didn't seem to need to have this broader experience that everyone seems to want to have. maybe i am missing something that i don't know about or understand, who knows? :smileyhappy: i think that perhaps the pendulum needs to swing back a bit toward the middle instead of this policy today of "anything goes"! moderation is always a better approach.


I graduated college in '99 and went to two very different high schools...the first being in a town in CT much like the on in BIF filled with wealthy, over privileged children who felt that they were untouchable. Though, because of the area, there was a high academic focus since my high school was nationally ranked for it's size. There was a lot of pressure from family, faculty, and the student body to do something to make yourself stand out (star athlete, brainiac, lead in the school play, etc). There were those who would sneak out in study hall to do drugs in the back parking lot, but for the most part there was a focus on organized learning. 
twj wrote:  when i went to school, drugs were a non event! they just didn't exist the way they do today. the worst offense was getting caught smoking on school property. maybe in our desire to better our schools, we fixed a lot of stuff that wasn't broken, simply by throwing money at it. we removed a lot of courses that would have taught good citizenship to pay for courses like sex education instead. maybe civics courses are the way to go!


I then moved up to small town NH where in 1996 the high school was still functioning under the open classroom teaching styles from the 70's. The academic pressure there was to do what you had to do graduate (and faculty bent the rules to get people to pass as much as they could). A small portion of the student body was focused on their education, the rest were allowed to slack off and ignore it.

twj: that is a disgraceful educational policy. why didn't the parents revolt? in this case, it sounds like they had good cause.

It all depends on the overall level of education in the community I think, if most of the adult generation didn't go to college (or graduate from high school) the present students will experience less of an educational focus than if the community is populated with adults who have at least an undergraduate degree.

twj: i think you are right but educators are supposed to create sound education for the students regardless of background. otherwise, where is the hope for each succeeding generation? it sounds like our system is failing the students, the parents and the teachers who dedicate themselves to their classes.


Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

Vtcozy wrote..In referance to Hush,Hush and parental involvement,Its what is was,because of the circumstances,Nora and her Mom were in..More will follow to understand in 'Cresendo" next book I think parents are torn between how much is too much freedom,and when to let go.The drinking,driving is all too commom,in every socio economic community...BIF is on the right track..I am into chapter 3..so thats all I will say..
jb70 wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

This book has raised lots of questions for me.

I know there are young adults reading this book. I wonder what they think of the parents in the book who seem to expect so little of their children, giving them fancy cars and “stuff” without the requisite instruction on responsibility.

Do the young adults out there want more or less discipline? How do the young adults think these kinds of situations arise? How do they think bullies can be stopped? What makes someone popular and what perpetuates their "mean" behavior? Why would people still "worship" these people even when they are mean?

What do they think of a parent who would allow them to be in a car driven by someone who is known to be careless and reckless, without intervening?

Why is casual sex treated like a contest? Would they like stricter moral and ethical rules?


I've wondered about the absence of parental involvement in other YA books too (like Hush, Hush if anyone else particiapated in that First Look).  I know my parents didn't know everything I did in high school but they always asked where I was going and gave me a time to come back and I never went out all night. 

 

The book also reminded of of what I remember of "Mean Girls" the movie with Lindsay Lohan as a girl who gets into the in crowd kind of like Sam gets into it.  Also I thought there were now laws on the books about how many passengers a young driver can have in the car to avoid situations like this but maybe those are still in the talking about phase.


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Inspired Correspondent
jb70
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎07-06-2009

Re: Before I Fall, Early Chapters, 1-2

I just got through everyone else's thoughts on this topic.  Here is where I am so far:

I think that Sam has been repressing her true self for years so that she can fit in with Lindsay and her crowd and has given up an awful lot that was important to her like her horseback riding.  She has allowed her focus to be put on popularity instead of things that will matter in the long haul, if someone is really your friend they are your friend no matter what so if that is not the case then you have a trade off and she has decided that in order to be at the top of the food chain she will give away her self control.  I think it is very sad that she is going to have sex with Rob to get it over with, I have a whole slew of thoughts on premarital sex but if someone is going to have it I would hope if would be for a reason other than to stop being taunted by friends and to get it over with, how will that be to look back on one day and know that you wasted something that should have been special and meaningful on someone she isn't even that attracted to most of the time (like not liking how he kisses and being grossed out by his hands and his smell, hello-big time reason not to have sex). 

 

I think the Sam we are seeing is not the true Sam and I not sure how much she dislikes her sister and how much she is just rushed and not even thinking about her.  All of the girls have their own skeletons as other posters have mentioned, but instead of helping one another they all hide them to be the same, like the elephant in the room.  I think that she would like to be friends with Kent again but it too afraid of being made fun of (how is it that Lindsay was her biggest taunter with the red, white and freak comment and then she is able to ingnore that and become one of her best friends).  I hope at some point Sam confides with Kent or just stops going with the others to the party or tries to change things.  Look at how much was changed by them not making the swimming girl late to school or Brianna not finding out that her boyfriend is ditching to spend time with another girl.

 

I wonder why Linday feels the need to make so many people miserable, like Julia and Katie.  Is she so afraid to be taken out of the top spot?

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