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Frequent Contributor
Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?


2britt13 wrote:

Out of everything Sam did to change what happens what was your favorite?


 

Definitely the gorgeous scene at Goose Point, when she is finally kind to Izzy.

Inspired Contributor
tweezle
Posts: 75
Registered: ‎11-03-2009

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Hi Rosemary!

 

I really enjoyed "Before I Fall" and am curious about the process of how this, or any other book gets from author to market. Could you explain the process? I know an author sends a chapter or two in to a publisher, and they are either accepted or rejected. I have no idea what happens from there or even who accepts or rejects that sampling.

 

Thank you for your time!

“Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.” - Mason Cooley
**3 NOOKS with 3 separate accounts in one household.**
Frequent Contributor
Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?


tweezle wrote:

Hi Rosemary!

 

I really enjoyed "Before I Fall" and am curious about the process of how this, or any other book gets from author to market. Could you explain the process? I know an author sends a chapter or two in to a publisher, and they are either accepted or rejected. I have no idea what happens from there or even who accepts or rejects that sampling.

 

Thank you for your time!


The process varies, but I hope I can give you a general idea. I'm sure it's very mysterious to people who are not in the publishing industry.

 

1. The author or the author's literary agent sends either an entire manuscript or sample chapters to an editor. What they send depends upon many factors: for a first novel, such as BEFORE I FALL, it would be more common to send the entire novel, as the author has not been published before. We accepted Lauren's second novel based on sample chapters.

 

2. Who reads the submissions? Almost all of my submissions are from literary agents, When I receive them (via e-mail), I put them on my electronic reader, so I don't have to print. This saves trees and my back, as my backpack gets heavy with all these manuscripts. Sometimes I will have my assistant read first and do a report, but I do often read manuscripts myself. Some houses have people whose sole job is to read submissions.

 

3. Editors read at home, on the train commute, before bed, at their kids' soccer games, while waiting for water to boil... In other words, incessantly. There are always manuscripts on my reader that are making me feel completely guilty about doing anything else. Like breathing.

 

4. Much of what I read is pretty good but for some reason does not work: It's not outstanding enough, it's too similar to what's out there, it needs a great deal of revision, it will not sell in the market. And this is a business, so editors have to consider that. Sometimes I'll ask for a revision, but won't offer a contract yet.

 

 

5. The process differs from publisher to publisher, but if I find a manuscript I want to publish, I share it with the Editorial Director. If she agrees, I take it to...

 

6. ...the editorial meeting. There, several other editors, plus the publisher and editor-in-chief and fiction publishing director discuss it with me. If people feel the project is viable for us, I take it to...

 

7. ...the acquisitions meeting. Before the acquisitions meeting, I work with my assistant to prepare a profit-and-loss statement, based on the financials of the book--how many copies we think we can sell, at what price, etc. We all love books, but yes, it's a business, and we have to do well to stay in business.   The acquisitions meeting is attended by people from sales, marketing, finance, inventory control, subsidiary rights, design, and other areas. We talk about the book, and the editor makes her case for acquiring it.

 

8. If all goes well at the acquisitions meeting, I put together an offer for the agent or author.

 

9. If the agent/author accepts, we prepare a contract, which the author signs.

 

10. In the meantime, I re-read the manuscript and, depending on what state it's in, just write an editorial letter (which is sometimes very, very long) or write an editorial letter and line edit the manuscript at the same time.

 

11. The author revises. I read. I edit again. I send the manuscript to the author.

 

12. The author does more revision. (Sometimes this is repeated several times; sometimes not. Usually, if I am taking on a manuscript and the author already has a contract, a book should not need that much revision.)

 

13. I give the manuscript to the editorial production department, where it is copy edited.

 

14. It comes back to me, I go over it, and then I send it to the author.

 

15. The author marks his or her changes on it and I return it to editorial production.

 

16. Desktop publishing inputs the changes.

 

17. The designer prepares sample pages, which shows me the type style and size, the chapter openers, and any special elements.

 

18. Galleys are made in-house. They go to the author and a proofreader. Galleys are read by the author, ther proofreader, the copy editor, and the editor. This is my last read before publication, and I need to take my time with it. We make any changes that are necessary.

 

19. We produce bound galleys, or ARCs, for reviewers, like the one you read of BEFORE I FALL.

 

20. There's a whole separate process for making a book jacket, but that's another kettle of fish entirely.

 

21. We get a bound book. The author holds it in his or her hand. Yay!

 

Hope this is helpful.

Correspondent
Sadie1
Posts: 74
Registered: ‎07-16-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Rosemay, I would like to tell you that you are such a treat as an editor!  I have enjoyed reading your responses along with the questions asked.

 

I finished the book yesterday.  Got to chapter 5 and couldn't stop.  Just could not stop.  Stayed up for hours until it was finished.  Very good book!

 

I showed the book to my 17 year old son today.  I would like for him to read it.  He takes one look at the cover and tells me it looks like a chick book.  Well, he is right.  It does look like a chick book from the cover.  I feel this book is good for guys and dolls.  Especially teenage guys along with teenage girls.

 

So, my question is, did anyone consider that the cover would be a turn off to a teenage boy?  There's a great story here, but what if a guy won't read it because of the feminine cover?  I just thought you might like an honest opinion from one 17 year old guy that reads a lot and loves to read. 

 

He is currently reading, Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carrol.  He took his hard earned lawn mowing money and bought the Complete Works of Lewis Carrol on his own.  He's one of those teenagers hanging out in the Young Adult/teen section of the local Barnes and Noble.  I'm the parent a row or two over not cramping his style.  LOL!

 

Lisa in Georgia

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Rosemary, Thank you for the timeline. It helps put everything into perspective.

tweezle, very good question.

pen21

Contributor
BoilerWriter
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎01-06-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


Rosemary-Brosnan wrote:

tweezle wrote:

Hi Rosemary!

 

I really enjoyed "Before I Fall" and am curious about the process of how this, or any other book gets from author to market. Could you explain the process? I know an author sends a chapter or two in to a publisher, and they are either accepted or rejected. I have no idea what happens from there or even who accepts or rejects that sampling.

 

Thank you for your time!


The process varies, but I hope I can give you a general idea. I'm sure it's very mysterious to people who are not in the publishing industry.

 

1. The author or the author's literary agent sends either an entire manuscript or sample chapters to an editor. What they send depends upon many factors: for a first novel, such as BEFORE I FALL, it would be more common to send the entire novel, as the author has not been published before. We accepted Lauren's second novel based on sample chapters.

 

2. Who reads the submissions? Almost all of my submissions are from literary agents, When I receive them (via e-mail), I put them on my electronic reader, so I don't have to print. This saves trees and my back, as my backpack gets heavy with all these manuscripts. Sometimes I will have my assistant read first and do a report, but I do often read manuscripts myself. Some houses have people whose sole job is to read submissions.

 

3. Editors read at home, on the train commute, before bed, at their kids' soccer games, while waiting for water to boil... In other words, incessantly. There are always manuscripts on my reader that are making me feel completely guilty about doing anything else. Like breathing.

 

4. Much of what I read is pretty good but for some reason does not work: It's not outstanding enough, it's too similar to what's out there, it needs a great deal of revision, it will not sell in the market. And this is a business, so editors have to consider that. Sometimes I'll ask for a revision, but won't offer a contract yet.

 

 

5. The process differs from publisher to publisher, but if I find a manuscript I want to publish, I share it with the Editorial Director. If she agrees, I take it to...

 

6. ...the editorial meeting. There, several other editors, plus the publisher and editor-in-chief and fiction publishing director discuss it with me. If people feel the project is viable for us, I take it to...

 

7. ...the acquisitions meeting. Before the acquisitions meeting, I work with my assistant to prepare a profit-and-loss statement, based on the financials of the book--how many copies we think we can sell, at what price, etc. We all love books, but yes, it's a business, and we have to do well to stay in business.   The acquisitions meeting is attended by people from sales, marketing, finance, inventory control, subsidiary rights, design, and other areas. We talk about the book, and the editor makes her case for acquiring it.

 

8. If all goes well at the acquisitions meeting, I put together an offer for the agent or author.

 

9. If the agent/author accepts, we prepare a contract, which the author signs.

 

10. In the meantime, I re-read the manuscript and, depending on what state it's in, just write an editorial letter (which is sometimes very, very long) or write an editorial letter and line edit the manuscript at the same time.

 

11. The author revises. I read. I edit again. I send the manuscript to the author.

 

12. The author does more revision. (Sometimes this is repeated several times; sometimes not. Usually, if I am taking on a manuscript and the author already has a contract, a book should not need that much revision.)

 

13. I give the manuscript to the editorial production department, where it is copy edited.

 

14. It comes back to me, I go over it, and then I send it to the author.

 

15. The author marks his or her changes on it and I return it to editorial production.

 

16. Desktop publishing inputs the changes.

 

17. The designer prepares sample pages, which shows me the type style and size, the chapter openers, and any special elements.

 

18. Galleys are made in-house. They go to the author and a proofreader. Galleys are read by the author, ther proofreader, the copy editor, and the editor. This is my last read before publication, and I need to take my time with it. We make any changes that are necessary.

 

19. We produce bound galleys, or ARCs, for reviewers, like the one you read of BEFORE I FALL.

 

20. There's a whole separate process for making a book jacket, but that's another kettle of fish entirely.

 

21. We get a bound book. The author holds it in his or her hand. Yay!

 

Hope this is helpful.


 

 

  I found your detailed explanation above extremely interesting and informative. It has been so fascinating to have you involved with the discussion groups. Your second statement caught my attention. I am involved in a local writer's group in addition to taking on-line writing courses. The topic of agents comes up quite often between the two venues and opinions always vary. A fellow writer in my local group who is a freelance travel writer insists I need to find an agent. Other writing instructors have said that it isn't necessary to invest money in hiring an agent. I've held the view that the resources listed in a current copy of Writer's Market should suffice, but after reading your response that indicates you receive almost all of your submissions from literary agents via e-mail, I have to question whether I should rethink my opinion. You also mention in your first statement that authors publishing for the first time generally submit their entire manuscript. Is that also done by e-mail?

Thank you again for all the insight you have shared with us.

Inspired Contributor
Zia01
Posts: 187
Registered: ‎08-08-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


Rosemary-Brosnan wrote:

tweezle wrote:

Hi Rosemary!

 

I really enjoyed "Before I Fall" and am curious about the process of how this, or any other book gets from author to market. Could you explain the process? I know an author sends a chapter or two in to a publisher, and they are either accepted or rejected. I have no idea what happens from there or even who accepts or rejects that sampling.

 

Thank you for your time!


The process varies, but I hope I can give you a general idea. I'm sure it's very mysterious to people who are not in the publishing industry.

 

1. The author or the author's literary agent sends either an entire manuscript or sample chapters to an editor. What they send depends upon many factors: for a first novel, such as BEFORE I FALL, it would be more common to send the entire novel, as the author has not been published before. We accepted Lauren's second novel based on sample chapters.

 

2. Who reads the submissions? Almost all of my submissions are from literary agents, When I receive them (via e-mail), I put them on my electronic reader, so I don't have to print. This saves trees and my back, as my backpack gets heavy with all these manuscripts. Sometimes I will have my assistant read first and do a report, but I do often read manuscripts myself. Some houses have people whose sole job is to read submissions.

 

3. Editors read at home, on the train commute, before bed, at their kids' soccer games, while waiting for water to boil... In other words, incessantly. There are always manuscripts on my reader that are making me feel completely guilty about doing anything else. Like breathing.

 

4. Much of what I read is pretty good but for some reason does not work: It's not outstanding enough, it's too similar to what's out there, it needs a great deal of revision, it will not sell in the market. And this is a business, so editors have to consider that. Sometimes I'll ask for a revision, but won't offer a contract yet.

 

 

5. The process differs from publisher to publisher, but if I find a manuscript I want to publish, I share it with the Editorial Director. If she agrees, I take it to...

 

6. ...the editorial meeting. There, several other editors, plus the publisher and editor-in-chief and fiction publishing director discuss it with me. If people feel the project is viable for us, I take it to...

 

7. ...the acquisitions meeting. Before the acquisitions meeting, I work with my assistant to prepare a profit-and-loss statement, based on the financials of the book--how many copies we think we can sell, at what price, etc. We all love books, but yes, it's a business, and we have to do well to stay in business.   The acquisitions meeting is attended by people from sales, marketing, finance, inventory control, subsidiary rights, design, and other areas. We talk about the book, and the editor makes her case for acquiring it.

 

8. If all goes well at the acquisitions meeting, I put together an offer for the agent or author.

 

9. If the agent/author accepts, we prepare a contract, which the author signs.

 

10. In the meantime, I re-read the manuscript and, depending on what state it's in, just write an editorial letter (which is sometimes very, very long) or write an editorial letter and line edit the manuscript at the same time.

 

11. The author revises. I read. I edit again. I send the manuscript to the author.

 

12. The author does more revision. (Sometimes this is repeated several times; sometimes not. Usually, if I am taking on a manuscript and the author already has a contract, a book should not need that much revision.)

 

13. I give the manuscript to the editorial production department, where it is copy edited.

 

14. It comes back to me, I go over it, and then I send it to the author.

 

15. The author marks his or her changes on it and I return it to editorial production.

 

16. Desktop publishing inputs the changes.

 

17. The designer prepares sample pages, which shows me the type style and size, the chapter openers, and any special elements.

 

18. Galleys are made in-house. They go to the author and a proofreader. Galleys are read by the author, ther proofreader, the copy editor, and the editor. This is my last read before publication, and I need to take my time with it. We make any changes that are necessary.

 

19. We produce bound galleys, or ARCs, for reviewers, like the one you read of BEFORE I FALL.

 

20. There's a whole separate process for making a book jacket, but that's another kettle of fish entirely.

 

21. We get a bound book. The author holds it in his or her hand. Yay!

 

Hope this is helpful.


 

Thank you! That was very informative and I enjoyed learning a little bit about the process.

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Thank you Rosemary for taking the time to explain how it all comes together,it has been a Mystery,for me and others.Now that we know the process, it makes it easier to understand the stress level of the Author and the waiting and finally the release of the book..Thank you for recognizing how uber talented Lauren is..Vtc...
Zia01 wrote:

 


Rosemary-Brosnan wrote:

tweezle wrote:

Hi Rosemary!

 

I really enjoyed "Before I Fall" and am curious about the process of how this, or any other book gets from author to market. Could you explain the process? I know an author sends a chapter or two in to a publisher, and they are either accepted or rejected. I have no idea what happens from there or even who accepts or rejects that sampling.

 

Thank you for your time!


The process varies, but I hope I can give you a general idea. I'm sure it's very mysterious to people who are not in the publishing industry.

 

1. The author or the author's literary agent sends either an entire manuscript or sample chapters to an editor. What they send depends upon many factors: for a first novel, such as BEFORE I FALL, it would be more common to send the entire novel, as the author has not been published before. We accepted Lauren's second novel based on sample chapters.

 

2. Who reads the submissions? Almost all of my submissions are from literary agents, When I receive them (via e-mail), I put them on my electronic reader, so I don't have to print. This saves trees and my back, as my backpack gets heavy with all these manuscripts. Sometimes I will have my assistant read first and do a report, but I do often read manuscripts myself. Some houses have people whose sole job is to read submissions.

 

3. Editors read at home, on the train commute, before bed, at their kids' soccer games, while waiting for water to boil... In other words, incessantly. There are always manuscripts on my reader that are making me feel completely guilty about doing anything else. Like breathing.

 

4. Much of what I read is pretty good but for some reason does not work: It's not outstanding enough, it's too similar to what's out there, it needs a great deal of revision, it will not sell in the market. And this is a business, so editors have to consider that. Sometimes I'll ask for a revision, but won't offer a contract yet.

 

 

5. The process differs from publisher to publisher, but if I find a manuscript I want to publish, I share it with the Editorial Director. If she agrees, I take it to...

 

6. ...the editorial meeting. There, several other editors, plus the publisher and editor-in-chief and fiction publishing director discuss it with me. If people feel the project is viable for us, I take it to...

 

7. ...the acquisitions meeting. Before the acquisitions meeting, I work with my assistant to prepare a profit-and-loss statement, based on the financials of the book--how many copies we think we can sell, at what price, etc. We all love books, but yes, it's a business, and we have to do well to stay in business.   The acquisitions meeting is attended by people from sales, marketing, finance, inventory control, subsidiary rights, design, and other areas. We talk about the book, and the editor makes her case for acquiring it.

 

8. If all goes well at the acquisitions meeting, I put together an offer for the agent or author.

 

9. If the agent/author accepts, we prepare a contract, which the author signs.

 

10. In the meantime, I re-read the manuscript and, depending on what state it's in, just write an editorial letter (which is sometimes very, very long) or write an editorial letter and line edit the manuscript at the same time.

 

11. The author revises. I read. I edit again. I send the manuscript to the author.

 

12. The author does more revision. (Sometimes this is repeated several times; sometimes not. Usually, if I am taking on a manuscript and the author already has a contract, a book should not need that much revision.)

 

13. I give the manuscript to the editorial production department, where it is copy edited.

 

14. It comes back to me, I go over it, and then I send it to the author.

 

15. The author marks his or her changes on it and I return it to editorial production.

 

16. Desktop publishing inputs the changes.

 

17. The designer prepares sample pages, which shows me the type style and size, the chapter openers, and any special elements.

 

18. Galleys are made in-house. They go to the author and a proofreader. Galleys are read by the author, ther proofreader, the copy editor, and the editor. This is my last read before publication, and I need to take my time with it. We make any changes that are necessary.

 

19. We produce bound galleys, or ARCs, for reviewers, like the one you read of BEFORE I FALL.

 

20. There's a whole separate process for making a book jacket, but that's another kettle of fish entirely.

 

21. We get a bound book. The author holds it in his or her hand. Yay!

 

Hope this is helpful.


 

Thank you! That was very informative and I enjoyed learning a little bit about the process.

 


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Frequent Contributor
Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?


Sadie1 wrote:

Rosemay, I would like to tell you that you are such a treat as an editor!  I have enjoyed reading your responses along with the questions asked.

 

I finished the book yesterday.  Got to chapter 5 and couldn't stop.  Just could not stop.  Stayed up for hours until it was finished.  Very good book!

 

I showed the book to my 17 year old son today.  I would like for him to read it.  He takes one look at the cover and tells me it looks like a chick book.  Well, he is right.  It does look like a chick book from the cover.  I feel this book is good for guys and dolls.  Especially teenage guys along with teenage girls.

 

So, my question is, did anyone consider that the cover would be a turn off to a teenage boy?  There's a great story here, but what if a guy won't read it because of the feminine cover?  I just thought you might like an honest opinion from one 17 year old guy that reads a lot and loves to read. 

 

He is currently reading, Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carrol.  He took his hard earned lawn mowing money and bought the Complete Works of Lewis Carrol on his own.  He's one of those teenagers hanging out in the Young Adult/teen section of the local Barnes and Noble.  I'm the parent a row or two over not cramping his style.  LOL!

 

Lisa in Georgia




Hi, Lisa,
I am so glad to hear that your son is such a big reader. That's great! We so often lose boys as readers once they become teenagers. So nice to hear about him!
I agree with you that the jacket would not appeal to teenage boys. One of my sons read it and loved it, but I'm sure he would not have carried the ARC around school! You are right: It has a cover that will appeal to girls and women. That was intentional on our part, even though we do think that boys would like the book if they started reading it, as we need to really target our audience when we are designing a jacket, and the very large majority of the audience for this book will be female. We would also like to reach women, as this is certainly not a book that will appeal only to teens--which I see, happily, is true from the comments here on the message board. But we were feeling that teenage boys would be a small part of the book's audience, and it's hard to make a jacket that will appeal to everyone. 
I think you make a very good point, and it's a good question.

Frequent Contributor
Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


pen21 wrote:

Rosemary, Thank you for the timeline. It helps put everything into perspective.

tweezle, very good question.

pen21


 

Glad I could be helpful! There are variances in this, of course, but it gives you a basic idea.

 

Frequent Contributor
Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


BoilerWriter wrote:

 


  I found your detailed explanation above extremely interesting and informative. It has been so fascinating to have you involved with the discussion groups.

 

 

******** Thanks so much! It's fun to be on here!

 

Your second statement caught my attention. I am involved in a local writer's group in addition to taking on-line writing courses. The topic of agents comes up quite often between the two venues and opinions always vary. A fellow writer in my local group who is a freelance travel writer insists I need to find an agent. Other writing instructors have said that it isn't necessary to invest money in hiring an agent. I've held the view that the resources listed in a current copy of Writer's Market should suffice, but after reading your response that indicates you receive almost all of your submissions from literary agents via e-mail, I have to question whether I should rethink my opinion. You also mention in your first statement that authors publishing for the first time generally submit their entire manuscript. Is that also done by e-mail?

Thank you again for all the insight you have shared with us.


 

 

This is an age-old question, and it's a tough one to answer. It's a good question, and I know it comes up whenever writers are together. There's no one right answer. Sometimes it's as hard to find an agent as it is to find a publisher. I think it's easier to place your work with an editor if you have an agent. The agent has relationships with different editors and knows who might like your manuscript. It's a lot harder for an author to figure this out on his or her own. Also, many publishers don't accept unsolicited manuscripts, so it's difficult to get your foot in the door. If an author decides not to work with an agent, one strategy would be to attend conferences with editors. The Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, for instances, sponsors great regional conferences and invites editors to them. Another strategy is to join a writers' group, as you have, and share information with one another. Also, visiting a bookstore and seeing what is new that is similar to what you have written, and who publishes it, is a good strategy. 

 

In the end, I think that if an author is really outstanding--agent or no agent--he or she will be published. Even in this tough climate, I still think that.

 

As far as e-mailing or mailing manuscripts, I think it depends on the editor. I work via e-mail--saves the environment. 

Frequent Contributor
Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


Zia01 wrote:

 


 

Thank you! That was very informative and I enjoyed learning a little bit about the process.

 

 I am so glad! --RB

 

 

Contributor
lau05
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎01-08-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Hello Rosemary,

 

I thank you the answer about the selection of the manuscripts that you receive constantly. Also I enjoyed reading the process of a book since the author to the market. It's incredible how many hands the book pass!! And how many readings you make!!

 

I want to make you a general question. When an author write a book about a kind (crime, thriller, chick, urban...), does the editor or the agent consider that the next books of the author will be about the same theme? Or, however, would they accept a different kind of novel if it worths? Does an author always come a standstill in a only theme??

Frequent Contributor
Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


lau05 wrote:

Hello Rosemary,

 

I thank you the answer about the selection of the manuscripts that you receive constantly. Also I enjoyed reading the process of a book since the author to the market. It's incredible how many hands the book pass!! And how many readings you make!!

 

I want to make you a general question. When an author write a book about a kind (crime, thriller, chick, urban...), does the editor or the agent consider that the next books of the author will be about the same theme? Or, however, would they accept a different kind of novel if it worths? Does an author always come a standstill in a only theme??


 

I think this depends completely on the author. Some authors like to write in different genres and for different age groups. Others prefer to stick to one genre. As an editor, I like to be open to what the author would like to do. Some of the authors I work with write different kinds of books; others stick to the same genre. For the publisher, the main consideration would be whether what the author has written is working as a story, no matter the genre.

 

Moderator
Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Hi all,

 

Today is Rosemary's last day with us! Let's give her our thanks!

 

Rosemary, thank you so much for getting Before I Fall into our hands, and for joining us! You can tell you've got a fan club here.

 

Hope we get to read many more of the novels you usher onto the shelves.

 

Rachel

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Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Dear Rosemary,As i opened my email., i was sad to learn that this is your last day with us..Of course its been posted,but nevertheless..Sorry that you must go.Its been for me,the second best FirstLook experience with an Editor of one our FirdtLook Books.The other Editor was also a FLTeenReads Editor,our first YA Novel here. .Your ability to envision what a good novel must have,and of course to embrace the talent that Lauren has,is a rare gift..Thank you for your patience,and wonderful knowledge..I have learned so much..I hope we exceeded your expectations.."Before I Fall" is just part of me,and will share the experience(wihout any spoilers) with friends and family..Which of course,I have already..Goodbyes are hard,so I will say..Hope to see you on one of our Boards,  Best...Vtc  Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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Annette94
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎01-06-2010
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Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

Hello, I found several mistakes in the book, feel free to email me to clear them up. For example, in page 361 Ally's name is spelled "Alley" in the 3rd paragraph. And like those, are many mistakes.

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Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?


Rachel-K wrote:

Hi all,

 

Today is Rosemary's last day with us! Let's give her our thanks!

 

Rosemary, thank you so much for getting Before I Fall into our hands, and for joining us! You can tell you've got a fan club here.

 

Hope we get to read many more of the novels you usher onto the shelves.

 

Rachel

 

 

 

Thank you, Rachel! It's been such a pleasure for me to participate in First Look, and I am thrilled that BEFORE I FALL is getting such an enthusiastic reception! Thank you, everyone, for your interesting questions and terrific comments for me as well as for Lauren. I look forward to continuing to read the discussions about the book. And thank you, everyone, for making me feel so welcome here. 

 

Happy Reading

 

Rosemary


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Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


Vermontcozy wrote:

Dear Rosemary,As i opened my email., i was sad to learn that this is your last day with us..Of course its been posted,but nevertheless..Sorry that you must go.Its been for me,the second best FirstLook experience with an Editor of one our FirdtLook Books.The other Editor was also a FLTeenReads Editor,our first YA Novel here. .Your ability to envision what a good novel must have,and of course to embrace the talent that Lauren has,is a rare gift..Thank you for your patience,and wonderful knowledge..I have learned so much..I hope we exceeded your expectations.."Before I Fall" is just part of me,and will share the experience(wihout any spoilers) with friends and family..Which of course,I have already..Goodbyes are hard,so I will say..Hope to see you on one of our Boards,  Best...Vtc  Susan


Dear Susan,
Thank you so much for your kind comments. That means a lot to me, and I'm so glad you've been enjoying the discussion. This experience definitely has exceeded my expectations. All of you have such a thriving community of readers here at First Look, and it's thrilling to me as an editor to read these early comments about Lauren's book. And thank you for all of your great comments and questions throughout the discussion. I hope to be back again on here, too!
Regards,
Rosemary

 

 

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Rosemary-Brosnan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: Questions for Rosemary Brosnan?

 


Annette94 wrote:

Hello, I found several mistakes in the book, feel free to email me to clear them up. For example, in page 361 Ally's name is spelled "Alley" in the 3rd paragraph. And like those, are many mistakes.


 

 

Hi, Annette,

Thanks so much for pointing this out. I don't have the final book with me, but I will check page 361 as soon as I'm back in the office. Since what you are reading are bound galleys--made from the first-pass galleys of the book--there will be mistakes in them. I hope they've all been corrected in the final book.