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Wordsmith
kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

 

Joshua,
I appreciate your thoughts on these questions.  I'm not quite finished with the book but I like how you bring out the smaller questions under the events (did Cobb kill her or did she commit suicide?).  That is the part of this author's style that has appealed to me.  I'm not big on love stories (as I previously wrote) but I do like the author's writing style and the way he let's you form several scenerios as to how things might be and then continues to take you into his story.  I also like your views about what Cobb might be looking for in a companion.  Thanks for your thoughts
Kathy

al305j wrote:

Hi, my name is Joshua.  This is my first time participating in the book clubs on Barnes and Noble.  I'm glad to meet everyone and I'm enthusiastic about reading your replies. 

 

Knowing the ending: What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

 

Like the movie Seven Pounds, I am given the ending at the beginning of the story. During the opening of the book, I‘m thinking, “What the hell happened to Mary?” Yes, for a moment my assumption resembles Something Henry: did Cobb kill her? I grabbed my reading tools to dig deeper and deeper . . . and deeper. So in this book, knowing the ending is the hook, dragging the reader throughout the novel to know more about this Cobb character, Cobb’s relationship with Mary, and how Mary died. Will a treat reward the reader at the end with something spectacular or will a trick await the reader at the end with a murderer, a killer of the reader’s time?

 

Most love stories begin with complications and reversals, but the love story between Mary and Cobb is absolutely passionate and --relatively--psychologically uncomplicated from the first page. What effect does this have on you? Do you believe in immediate true love like this one?

 

I say the love story was somewhat a turn-off. Love at first sight? Are you serious? It made Mary seem more desperate, not more in love, since she most likely has Huntington’s disease. Therefore, the chances of another man falling in love with her fall--drastically. So it’s understandable she may think, “I fell in love with Cobb as soon as I saw him.” Maybe “love at first sight” for some people, but it must be a rare thing; reality doesn‘t seem to go that way. The writer seems to open us up to this idea with the following phrase: “in this universe, on this planet, in this country, in this state, in this country, beside this river . . .” Overall I think the author is saying that Cobb needs a lover with this kind of condition. Cobb needs someone who passionately lives life; it is due to Mary’s disease that she remembers how many days she has lived or studies ravens like she does, for example. Notice Cobb seems dispassionate about Thoreau in the first eight chapters. Cobb doesn’t go on and on about stories of Thoreau like Mary does with ravens. An occasional quote here and there. From that light, yeah, I can say the love story is interesting. This is no black or white question.

 

What do you make of Mary's nightmares?

 

Okay. We have a sleepwalker. “My mother used to tell me I had nightmares and I walked around . . . I once put my head through the spokes of a staircase and I couldn’t get out. I had gone down the block and up the stairs onto another porch, and for some reason I put my head into the railings of the porch, and for some reason I put my head into the railings of the porch and my head wouldn’t move” (64). So that’s how she died, I believe, as I was reading. You see, the author has an interesting way of trying to help the reader put the puzzle together with various scenarios, for, in the beginning, I was like, maybe Cobb killed her! Now I’m like, she died sleepwalking!

 

What do you make of Cobb's relationship with Henry David Thoreau? Mary respects his reason for being on this trip. Does she seem to embody any of what Cobb admires about Thoreau? Why do you think this writer is so important to Cobb?

 

While Cobb didn’t seem like he was thrilled about writing an essay about Thoreau due to all the essays already out there about that great personage, he just seems to be searching for the spirit of Thoreau embodied. Besides, Mary does love nature. She preaches the life of simplicity through fascinating examples. Don’t rush. Save the center of the sandwich for last, she says. “’Don’t spit into heaven,’ Mary says. “’Don’t tell the gods your plans; they’ll only laugh‘” (55). Those are two examples out of many more where Mary gives Cobb advice about living. Thoreau also thought his fellow man how to live.

 

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

It was cute and shows Mary’s relationship with the Chungamunga girls is very, very tight. I took the event seriously, just like a real marriage.

 

Could you know the test results without telling her?

 

Yes, if that’s what Mary wanted, I would respect her wishes. I could live without telling her.


 

 

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Joseph-Monninger
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

 


kpatton wrote:

 

Joshua,
I appreciate your thoughts on these questions.  I'm not quite finished with the book but I like how you bring out the smaller questions under the events (did Cobb kill her or did she commit suicide?).  That is the part of this author's style that has appealed to me.  I'm not big on love stories (as I previously wrote) but I do like the author's writing style and the way he let's you form several scenerios as to how things might be and then continues to take you into his story.  I also like your views about what Cobb might be looking for in a companion.  Thanks for your thoughts
Kathy

al305j wrote:

Hi, my name is Joshua.  This is my first time participating in the book clubs on Barnes and Noble.  I'm glad to meet everyone and I'm enthusiastic about reading your replies. 

 

Knowing the ending: What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

 

Like the movie Seven Pounds, I am given the ending at the beginning of the story. During the opening of the book, I‘m thinking, “What the hell happened to Mary?” Yes, for a moment my assumption resembles Something Henry: did Cobb kill her? I grabbed my reading tools to dig deeper and deeper . . . and deeper. So in this book, knowing the ending is the hook, dragging the reader throughout the novel to know more about this Cobb character, Cobb’s relationship with Mary, and how Mary died. Will a treat reward the reader at the end with something spectacular or will a trick await the reader at the end with a murderer, a killer of the reader’s time?

 

Most love stories begin with complications and reversals, but the love story between Mary and Cobb is absolutely passionate and --relatively--psychologically uncomplicated from the first page. What effect does this have on you? Do you believe in immediate true love like this one?

 

I say the love story was somewhat a turn-off. Love at first sight? Are you serious? It made Mary seem more desperate, not more in love, since she most likely has Huntington’s disease. Therefore, the chances of another man falling in love with her fall--drastically. So it’s understandable she may think, “I fell in love with Cobb as soon as I saw him.” Maybe “love at first sight” for some people, but it must be a rare thing; reality doesn‘t seem to go that way. The writer seems to open us up to this idea with the following phrase: “in this universe, on this planet, in this country, in this state, in this country, beside this river . . .” Overall I think the author is saying that Cobb needs a lover with this kind of condition. Cobb needs someone who passionately lives life; it is due to Mary’s disease that she remembers how many days she has lived or studies ravens like she does, for example. Notice Cobb seems dispassionate about Thoreau in the first eight chapters. Cobb doesn’t go on and on about stories of Thoreau like Mary does with ravens. An occasional quote here and there. From that light, yeah, I can say the love story is interesting. This is no black or white question.

 

What do you make of Mary's nightmares?

 

Okay. We have a sleepwalker. “My mother used to tell me I had nightmares and I walked around . . . I once put my head through the spokes of a staircase and I couldn’t get out. I had gone down the block and up the stairs onto another porch, and for some reason I put my head into the railings of the porch, and for some reason I put my head into the railings of the porch and my head wouldn’t move” (64). So that’s how she died, I believe, as I was reading. You see, the author has an interesting way of trying to help the reader put the puzzle together with various scenarios, for, in the beginning, I was like, maybe Cobb killed her! Now I’m like, she died sleepwalking!

 

What do you make of Cobb's relationship with Henry David Thoreau? Mary respects his reason for being on this trip. Does she seem to embody any of what Cobb admires about Thoreau? Why do you think this writer is so important to Cobb?

 

While Cobb didn’t seem like he was thrilled about writing an essay about Thoreau due to all the essays already out there about that great personage, he just seems to be searching for the spirit of Thoreau embodied. Besides, Mary does love nature. She preaches the life of simplicity through fascinating examples. Don’t rush. Save the center of the sandwich for last, she says. “’Don’t spit into heaven,’ Mary says. “’Don’t tell the gods your plans; they’ll only laugh‘” (55). Those are two examples out of many more where Mary gives Cobb advice about living. Thoreau also thought his fellow man how to live.

 

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

It was cute and shows Mary’s relationship with the Chungamunga girls is very, very tight. I took the event seriously, just like a real marriage.

 

Could you know the test results without telling her?

 

Yes, if that’s what Mary wanted, I would respect her wishes. I could live without telling her.


 

 


 

Thanks your your comments.  I wanted to jump in here because there is a question or issue that keeps coming up and it appears in your response.  You said love at first sight?  Come on...

 

 

Then a little later you -- or someone else -- mentioned that there was too much kissing.

 

Fair enough and everyone can set his or her own gauge on that.  But I have to say it strikes me as strange that a person wouldn't believe in love at first sight.  Heck, people fall for each other all the time on the spot.  Seriously, don't people get a little loopy sometimes right off the bat?  If not, I find it sad....  I'm not some big gushy guy, but certainly an instant attraction has happened to me.....and the physical side of a relationship is pretty intense in the beginning. Now, I may have gotten it all wrong and I may have overdone the kissing, etc., but goodness knows people meet and get married in a matter of days.  And they are often affection with each other to annoying degree.   Everyone who ends up with a person had a first meeting..And fell in love to some degree.  I mean, we have the entire canon of Medieval love, Ovid, Cupid shooting arrows, love sickness, puppy love, and so on...are they all simply made up?  Is Romeo kidding himself when he sees Juliet, or does love really pierce the eye and enter us?

 

If you want to call it lust, okay, but I would argue that the two overlap.  Anyway, I hope I don't sound defensive on this point...(though as soon as you say that, you ARE defensive...)  But I can't decide if some readers reactions are merely cynical, or they have not encountered a Yeti kind of punch in the nose....curious.  Are people really trying to say no one ever in the history of the world can fall in love on the spot?  That seems crazy to me...

 

My two cents on it, anyway...


kpatton wrote:

 

Joshua,
I appreciate your thoughts on these questions.  I'm not quite finished with the book but I like how you bring out the smaller questions under the events (did Cobb kill her or did she commit suicide?).  That is the part of this author's style that has appealed to me.  I'm not big on love stories (as I previously wrote) but I do like the author's writing style and the way he let's you form several scenerios as to how things might be and then continues to take you into his story.  I also like your views about what Cobb might be looking for in a companion.  Thanks for your thoughts
Kathy

al305j wrote:

Hi, my name is Joshua.  This is my first time participating in the book clubs on Barnes and Noble.  I'm glad to meet everyone and I'm enthusiastic about reading your replies. 

 

Knowing the ending: What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

 

Like the movie Seven Pounds, I am given the ending at the beginning of the story. During the opening of the book, I‘m thinking, “What the hell happened to Mary?” Yes, for a moment my assumption resembles Something Henry: did Cobb kill her? I grabbed my reading tools to dig deeper and deeper . . . and deeper. So in this book, knowing the ending is the hook, dragging the reader throughout the novel to know more about this Cobb character, Cobb’s relationship with Mary, and how Mary died. Will a treat reward the reader at the end with something spectacular or will a trick await the reader at the end with a murderer, a killer of the reader’s time?

 

Most love stories begin with complications and reversals, but the love story between Mary and Cobb is absolutely passionate and --relatively--psychologically uncomplicated from the first page. What effect does this have on you? Do you believe in immediate true love like this one?

 

I say the love story was somewhat a turn-off. Love at first sight? Are you serious? It made Mary seem more desperate, not more in love, since she most likely has Huntington’s disease. Therefore, the chances of another man falling in love with her fall--drastically. So it’s understandable she may think, “I fell in love with Cobb as soon as I saw him.” Maybe “love at first sight” for some people, but it must be a rare thing; reality doesn‘t seem to go that way. The writer seems to open us up to this idea with the following phrase: “in this universe, on this planet, in this country, in this state, in this country, beside this river . . .” Overall I think the author is saying that Cobb needs a lover with this kind of condition. Cobb needs someone who passionately lives life; it is due to Mary’s disease that she remembers how many days she has lived or studies ravens like she does, for example. Notice Cobb seems dispassionate about Thoreau in the first eight chapters. Cobb doesn’t go on and on about stories of Thoreau like Mary does with ravens. An occasional quote here and there. From that light, yeah, I can say the love story is interesting. This is no black or white question.

 

What do you make of Mary's nightmares?

 

Okay. We have a sleepwalker. “My mother used to tell me I had nightmares and I walked around . . . I once put my head through the spokes of a staircase and I couldn’t get out. I had gone down the block and up the stairs onto another porch, and for some reason I put my head into the railings of the porch, and for some reason I put my head into the railings of the porch and my head wouldn’t move” (64). So that’s how she died, I believe, as I was reading. You see, the author has an interesting way of trying to help the reader put the puzzle together with various scenarios, for, in the beginning, I was like, maybe Cobb killed her! Now I’m like, she died sleepwalking!

 

What do you make of Cobb's relationship with Henry David Thoreau? Mary respects his reason for being on this trip. Does she seem to embody any of what Cobb admires about Thoreau? Why do you think this writer is so important to Cobb?

 

While Cobb didn’t seem like he was thrilled about writing an essay about Thoreau due to all the essays already out there about that great personage, he just seems to be searching for the spirit of Thoreau embodied. Besides, Mary does love nature. She preaches the life of simplicity through fascinating examples. Don’t rush. Save the center of the sandwich for last, she says. “’Don’t spit into heaven,’ Mary says. “’Don’t tell the gods your plans; they’ll only laugh‘” (55). Those are two examples out of many more where Mary gives Cobb advice about living. Thoreau also thought his fellow man how to live.

 

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

It was cute and shows Mary’s relationship with the Chungamunga girls is very, very tight. I took the event seriously, just like a real marriage.

 

Could you know the test results without telling her?

 

Yes, if that’s what Mary wanted, I would respect her wishes. I could live without telling her.


 

 


 

 

 


Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

 

Isn't that how life operates quite frequently? 1.We have a vague notion about an event. 2. Something serious or unexpected happens. 3. We inquire and find out what lead up to the event - how circumstance brought about the happenings, what psychological questions are behind the resolution, who was involved, and how it actually happened. I can see that this wouldn't work for a mystery novel, but in this case I find that the middle gives us a progressively more involved, more urgent reason for the final outcome. In knowing this outcome my mind is relaxed enough to accept whatever detail leads up to it without going astray with assumptions that lead away from the author's intent.
Anyway, that's how I look at it, but then, I don't mind being told an ending of a book or movie, since I'm more interested in the description of the journey. Maybe this has to do with my favorite genre, the memoir, in which quite often the surrounding events are known. I know, for instance, how WWII ended before I read an account by one of the participants. Or an earthquake. Or an artist's life. Or a travelogue. In all cases the author survived, otherwise the piece would not have been written.

nikki824 wrote:

The fact that I know what happens in the end is a turn-off for me. I don't like that the book begins at the end and it is taking alot out of me to stay forcused and read this book. I guess I am strange but the stuff in the middle doesnt really interest me because I already kinda know whats going to happen.


 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

As someone who fell in love in a tent, under the stars, on her first date with somebody who took her on an airplane ride to an out-of-the-way landing strip, I believe in love at first sight. The man died sixteen years ago of cancer, but I can still see his face, taste his kisses, and faintly hear him whistle “Ode to Joy” while he guided the Piper Cub across a darkening sky. I remember how the sun outlined a raggedy, gray rain cloud. It ended up to be a crazy relationship, involving much heartache, but yes - it was love at first sight. We believe what we believe. About Easter bunnies. About Santa Claus. About dandelion wings. About love. And kissing? Hey, get as much as you can while it’s available. The more you store up, the more you will be able to remember when you live alone. 

Wordsmith
kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006

Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

 

Laura,
I agree with how you feel about the characters.  I hadn't been able to put my finger on it, but I too feel like an observer and not really being able to get into this book as a participant.
Katy

Fozzie wrote:

Peppermill wrote:

Did anyone out there not like Cobb?

 

Yes.


dhaupt wrote:

tdunham220 wrote:

I loved Cobb in this book. Even more than Mary. Mary introduces him to so many new experiences that most people would be unprepared for, but he accepts them so willingly because he loves her. I especially love how he never waivered in his desire to stay with Mary when she confessed her illness and the conditions she required of him to stay in her life. I think we all could use a man like Cobb in our life! Did anyone out there not like Cobb?


I LOVED Cobb, too and for the same reasons as you mentioned. He was an unfailingly loyal to Mary no matter the consequences to himself and his feelings about it.



 

I feel neutral about Cobb, and even Mary, although I do feel Mary to be the more sympathetic of the two characters.  I feel am an observer of this story, not a participant.  Maybe that will change as I continue reading.


 

 

gl
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gl
Posts: 128
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

I liked that the book began with Mary's death.  It sets the tone for the love story.  I tend to look for foreshadowing more carefully, etc.

 

I liked that Mary and Cobb's love story is passionate and with less of the usual drama.  I enjoyed learning about the two characters and their relationship without any contrived conflict. 

 

 

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parisianrose
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎11-18-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8 (my thoughts)

Because I am only this far in the book, I believe I have a unique point of view.  I love this book.  The ideas presented in it are unlike anything I've ever heard about.  The instant connection sensed between Cobb and Mary is romantic, along with the captivating Chungamunga girls and the idea that some people are bears.  I've come to suspect I know some...  A great piece of literature that I'll be recommending to my friends and family.

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Crazy-for-Books
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎11-02-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8


Rachel-K wrote:

 

Please use any of these questions to begin discussion of Eternal on the Water. Also please feel free to post your own questions for the group!

 

Knowing the ending: What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

 

Most love stories begin with complications and reversals, but the love story between Mary and Cobb is absolutely passionate and --relatively--psychologically uncomplicated from the first page. What effect does this have on  you? Do you believe in immediate true love like this one?

 

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

What do you make of Mary's conditions for Cobb for continuing to be together? Could you know the test results without telling her?

 

 


 

I finally finished this book last night and really enjoyed it.  It made me cry, but it also made me wonder if there really is such a thing as "love at first sight".  I'm not sure there is, but this book made me believe in it during the time I spent reading it.  It was very heartfelt and emotional. 

 

Knowing the ending: What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

 

I am mixed about this.  On one hand, it made me curious to read the progression of their love story, but on the other hand, I want all love stories to have a happy ending and knowing this one is tragic put me off a bit.

 

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

I don't think Cobb took it too seriously, but Mary and the Chungamunga girls did seem to take it a bit more seriously.  I think Mary felt that if the girls approved of Cobb and "married" them, then that is all she needed.

 

What do you make of Mary's conditions for Cobb for continuing to be together? Could you know the test results without telling her?

 

I don't think I could be as strong as Cobb.  I understand Mary's need to not know, but I'm not sure that I could live without knowing.  I couldn't know the test results without telling Mary or having it slip out accidentally.

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Frequent Contributor
hookedonbooks09
Posts: 128
Registered: ‎02-04-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

I loved the wedding.  How romantic and PURE it seemed.  Very rustic and beautiful.

 

--Barb

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. ~Groucho Marx
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HannibalCat
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8


Peppermill wrote:

Did anyone out there not like Cobb?

 

Yes.


dhaupt wrote:

tdunham220 wrote:

I loved Cobb in this book. Even more than Mary. Mary introduces him to so many new experiences that most people would be unprepared for, but he accepts them so willingly because he loves her. I especially love how he never waivered in his desire to stay with Mary when she confessed her illness and the conditions she required of him to stay in her life. I think we all could use a man like Cobb in our life! Did anyone out there not like Cobb?


I LOVED Cobb, too and for the same reasons as you mentioned. He was an unfailingly loyal to Mary no matter the consequences to himself and his feelings about it.



I loved Cobb, too. But I especially love the interaction between the two. They are touching, funny, loving, earthy, and tuned into each other. I find it great fun to be part of their lives.
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ladybug74
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎03-18-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

I apologize for getting started so late in the discussion. I finished graduate school last month and just started working full-time again a few weeks ago for the 1st time in a couple of years. The past few weeks have been crazy for me, with little free time to do my reading. I'm starting to settle into the new routine now and I am steadily catching up. I have not read the other responses before writing my own, so forgive me if any of this is repetitive.

 

The preface to this story, which actually told us how it would end, was very interesting to me. In fact, I would have to say that it was the most interesting part so far. The death at the beginning made me want to keep reading to find out what happened.  I am enjoying the rest of the book so far, but I am not as interested in it now as I was while reading the part about Mary's death.

 

The relationship between Mary and Cobb may seem uncomplicated, as mentioned in the questions for these chapters, but it does have complications. The main complication is that we are waiting to read about Mary getting sick and deciding to end her own life, as indicated by the preface to the book. It does seem a bit unreal that the two of them hit it off so well from the first time they met, but I definitely would not say there were no complications.

 

No, I do not believe in immediate true love. I do believe that some people get along with one another more easily than others and some may be quicker to fall in love or into a serious relationship, but I do not believe there is really such a thing as love at first sight. I think it takes time to truly appreciate and fall in love with another person.

 

My initial impression of Mary's nightmares was to think that she must be re-living some type of childhood trauma. Of course, I am a Social Worker who works with child protective services, so this may have influenced my thoughts about Mary's nightmares. I was personally physically abused as a child, so I have experienced my own nightmares as a result of childhood trauma. I assume the reason for the nightmares will be revealed in later chapters.

 

Thoreau wrote about nature, so of course I believe there is some relationship between Cobb's fondness of Thoreau and his fondness of Mary. I have no idea why this writer is so important to Cobb. I just assumed he was a writer that Cobb enjoyed and didn't look any deeper into this.

 

I think it's very sweet that the girls arranged a wedding for them. All little girls love to play at weddings, being mothers, teaching school, etc. so I thought it was cute. I feel like it was taken seriously. Most adults that I know, especially men, would not even play at being married if they didn't have strong feelings for the other person.

 

I think it would be close to impossible to know results of medical tests for someone I was in a relationship with and not tell them. If the results showed that nothing was wrong, of course I would want to tell them to ease their worries. If the results showed something serious, I believe the other person would be able to tell by the fact that I did not say anything and by my actions toward them after finding out the results. If I could not tell the other person, the easist thing to do would be to not know, myself. This would be hard, though.

Inspired Correspondent
ladybug74
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎03-18-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

PLEASE do not post spoilers like this. These last 2 paragraphs give away information that has not yet been discussed. Most of us only read chapters 1-8 before replying to the first questions about these chapters. You gave away a couple of important parts of this book that I have not read yet and reminded me why they are called "spoilers." :smileysad:

 

 


vpenning wrote:

Knowing the ending: What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

 

I have read many books that begin at the end. Although not my favorite way to start the book, I am aware that many love stories end with the couple getting together...so essentially you know the ending before you even open the cover of the book. So, with that said, knowing how it would end did not repel me, as I know that for any true love, it is the journey getting there that is the best part. And, this love story did not disappoint.

 

Most love stories begin with complications and reversals, but the love story between Mary and Cobb is absolutely passionate and --relatively--psychologically uncomplicated from the first page. What effect does this have on  you? Do you believe in immediate true love like this one?

 

Yes, I am a believer of true love QUICKLY, not at first sight....  I felt that Cobb had intrigue before love, and then lust. And eventually love...they just happened faster.

 

What do you make of Mary's nightmares?

 

At first I thought they were going to be an intrigal part of the story line...I even thought that her sleep walking might have contributed to here death...could have actually explained how she got into the water...but, then it did not seem to have much bearing. I am not sure if the nightmare was a precurser to the disease, or just a red herring to throw the reader off....

 

 

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

When the same words are repeated at the real wedding, you realize how significant that ceremony was for Mary. For the girls that may not live -like Myrtle-it is also significant in that this may be one wedding that they might be able to help plan and attend...a dream many little girls have.

 

What do you make of Mary's conditions for Cobb for continuing to be together? Could you know the test results without telling her?

 

Since Mary's mother indicates that she believes that Mary has known for years, it is not hard for Cobb not to tell. He is quite aware that Mary probably knows, it is just unspoken. In addition, since her symptoms present themselves very soon after he learns the test results, it is almost moot that he himself has learned. It just was put into writing.


 

Inspired Correspondent
ladybug74
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎03-18-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

I agree and wanted to say something along the same lines when I posted by reply. It's not the method by which a couple is married, but the feelings they have for one another that's important. I would have loved to be married in this manner because it was such a sweet ceremony.

 


kch wrote:

 

I love the Chungamunga girls' fairy wedding.  All weddings are about ritual, some go in for the religious wedding before the priest, in my faith we go to the temple to be sealed for eternity, some go to the court justice,and some just cohabitate long enough that the state recognizes them as married. The rituals don't matter as much as the commitment between the two people involved. If in the end Mary and Cobb are truly commited to each other and want to be married that Chungamungu Fairy wedding was a beautiful ritual to start their marriage with.

Make it a good one.


 

Inspired Correspondent
Immortal-Spirit
Posts: 143
Registered: ‎03-16-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

As others have mentioned, Mary's death at the beginning was the catch.  It kept me read because I was so curious as to where it was going.

Inspired Correspondent
Immortal-Spirit
Posts: 143
Registered: ‎03-16-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

I don't know what to think about Mary's nightmares.  We'll see...

Inspired Correspondent
Immortal-Spirit
Posts: 143
Registered: ‎03-16-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

I thought the fairy wedding was wonderful!  The Chungamunga girls did a great job!  Love it! 

Reader 2
jblaney801
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎12-01-2009
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

Knowing the ending: What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

 

I loved the opening of this book. It definitely hooked me and I haven't been able to put it down since. I was a little worried that I would not like this book, as it is about the outdoors and I am not an outdoors kind of person, but from the first line of this book I was all in.

 

Most love stories begin with complications and reversals, but the love story between Mary and Cobb is absolutely passionate and --relatively--psychologically uncomplicated from the first page. What effect does this have on  you? Do you believe in immediate true love like this one?

 

I think that things happened a little fast. Generally you don't meet someone and ask them to kiss you during your first conversation and "get married" a few days later. It is a little cheesy, but the more I read the more I understand. With Mary's condition, I don't think that she wants to waste time. She knows that she likes Cobb and is drawn to him so she just goes for it. I believe that Cobb was lonely and has been looking for someone to love. I don't believe in love at first sight, but I believe that these two characters were both in a place to take a chance and it worked out for them.

 

What do you make of Mary's nightmares?

 

They could be the first signs of Huntington's disease, of maybe she is just worrying about what the future holds for her.  I think that the nightmares were a way to show some of the symptons of Huntington's disease and to begin Mary's conversation about it with Cobb.

 

 

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

I think that everyone involved took it very seriously. It was a lovely ceremony and I believe that everyone considers Mary and Cobb married.

 

What do you make of Mary's conditions for Cobb for continuing to be together? Could you know the test results without telling her?

 

If I were Cobb I would not want to know. It is too much responsibility. I don't think that she should have made this request of him. I understand her thinking...she wanted him to have all of the information possible before continuing the relationship, but in reality, we could all die any day.

 

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

What do you make of the wedding that the Chungamunga girls arrange for them? How seriously do all of them take it?

 

I'm going to be rather blunt here, I thought it all rather sappy and I can not imagine that many men would go thru the enactment of a wedding.

Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

What effect does it have on your reading to open the novel with Mary's death presented to us first, and Cobb beginning to tell a ranger about her? Did this capture your attention or repel you, or both?

  

 

Well, the beginning is rather captivating because of course we want to know how she died and what preceeded her death and the story does begin to unfold and answer our questions.  Then too, it is almost used as a device to get you into the story which doesn't really grab you immediately.  The read sympathizes with Mary right away knowing her demise is imminent.

Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
Distinguished Wordsmith
Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 1-8

I thought Mary's rush to have herself sterilized was a bit far fetched.  She doesn't know for certain if she has the disease and I would think she would have to pay for the procedure herself.  I can't see medical insurance covering something like that without affirmation of medical necessity.

Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire