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Rachel-K
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia


BookWoman718 wrote:

HBT wrote:

 

I am not disturbed that Cobb did not talk to Mary about what her mother told him. It made him more honorable that way. The conditions were that he did not tell her one way or the other. Personally I know it is easier not to talk about the sickness or death of a loved one. Of course it is different for each individual.

--------------

 

I have to say I have had exactly the opposite life experience.  It was, for me and for most other survivors I have known, necessary to talk about the illness and death of our loved ones.  Both with the patient, while they were still alive, and of course after they are gone, with others.  I can't imagine keeping such strong emotions bottled away from your partner.  I understand that Cobb could talk to his father and to Mary's mother, and I'm sure that would help, but the sharing of the experience of life-threatening illness and end of life issues is one of intense intimacy. Even before you know "for sure" the ultimate diagnosis.  It is very much like the anticipation of a much desired birth;  you are sharing the very stuff of human love and life. 


I also had the opportunity to go through that experience with a loved one, and also found that the death process--very surprisingly and strangely--does mirror the birth experience, although I'm not sure I've heard anyone else put it that way.

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fordmg
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

Mary's Mother:  I liked Joan from the start.  I think she has a pragmatic attitude toward her daughter's illness.  She went a long way to make Cobb feel comfortable.  I think she liked him because Mary was so head over heels for him, but I think she had good vibes about Cobb as well. 

Cobb revealing Joan's idea that Mary knew:  I don't think Cobb should let Mary know what her mother said.  After all, all these years Joan has not pushed the issue with Mary. Cobb is keeping his promise not to tell.  That was the agreement.  It should stay. 

Mary saving a life:  I think that Mary doing what she can to save a youth's life is consistant with her personality.  Mary knows better than most how precious life is.    I was not surpirsed by the send off from the boy and his mother.  It gave a reflection on the culture of the island.  I liked that touch.

MG

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chris227
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

What is your impression of Mary's mother, and of her attitude toward Mary's illness?

I was actually a a little surprised at the description of Mary's mother.  Mary has such a carefree, in tune with nature kind of attitude and her mother seems so conservative and I would have never imagined she was adirector of pediatric nursing!.  I think some people may be put off by Mary's mother's attitude toward Mary's illness, "All of us are dying, honey.  Mary just has a shorter expiration date." (p 152).  As a nurse I think that Mary's mother has seen so much illness and death in her life (and for her it is with children) that she has come to see death as a reality.  She sees that Mary has lived her life to the fullest and to her that is what truly matters.  She, like many in the medical field, just uses humor a a coping mechanism, though that humor may be hard for some.

 

Our landscape changes dramatically in these brief chapters. How does the story change?

The story changes in locale but I think that a lot stays the same.  Cobb is again taken completely out of his element and dropped in this paradise that is unknown to him.  Mary still proves herself to be outgoing.  We get a little more insight into Mary's family and see Cobb and Mary;s relationship continue to grow.  We also see Mary jump in and save a boy's life, proving just what a kind, intelligent person she is.

 

Are you disturbed by Cobb not talking to Mary about her mother's revelation? Would it be easier to talk or to not talk about a loved one's sickness and death?  I am not at all disturbed by the fact that Cobb does not discuss her mother's revelation with Mary.  After all these are the terms that they agreed to.  If he spoke to her about the results she would probably feel she could no longer trust him and they may end their relationship.  This second question is quite tricky.  Illness and death are such hard subjects especially when it's about someone you love.  For me I think it would depend on the situation.  In this situation I think Cobb is doing the right thing.  Though I think you should be honest with your loved ones sometimes it is best to not broach the subject.

 

When Ken Carter talks of going to school at St. Paul's, do you get a clearer idea of who Cobb is, or what ordinary life was like for him, just before the novel opened and he embarked on this adventure?

Actually, when I was first reading this part, I was thinking now what does this have to do with anything?  But I think that this cnversation was to give a little insight into what life was like for Cobb befre he met Mary.  We see more of what his day to day was like and the people he normally interacted with. 

 

Mary is mistaken for a doctor, and although she explains that she isn't, she also rises to the occasion, and saves a boy's life in Lombok. What do we see about Mary in these scenes? Does the story of saving the child shed any light on Mary's condition? Does it change your feelings about her sickness at all?  In these scenes we learn more about Mary's compassion, strength, and determination.  Through prospects of her illness and her work with the Chungamunga girls she knows illness and death first hand and it is difficult for her to see anyone suffer, especially a child.  Though she is not an MD she has an idea and a strong conviction and does her very best to save the child's life and thankfully succeeds.  It does not change my idea of her illness but it shows me just how hard she will fight to keep death away.

 

What impression do you have of the mother and son at the end of chapter ten, when they come to see Mary off, and offer her their gratitude?  I just think that they are extremely thankful and feel indebted to Mary.  They are poor people and don't have much to offer in way of thanks but are willing to give up the little they have to this woman who saved the boy's life. 


 

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chris227
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I didn't feel that Mary was being pretentious at all.  When Mary said "it's your island" to Freddy I didn't think that she was saying it was "his" and not the locals.  I took it more as "I'll try everything I can if you want but if I don' succeed you are the one who has to live here and deal with aftermath, not me."

 

 


 

The scenes regarding the sick boy were my least favorite of the book so far.  Cathy mentioned that she felt it was a bit contrived.  I agree.  I also felt that the outsiders (Freddy, Mary and Cobb) were pretentious during the situation. Although I appreciate Mary's moxy for stepping in and I don't feel that she posed as a doctor or was mistaken for a docotr, I feel she somewhat overstepped her bounds in taking ownership of the situation.  At one point Mary says to Freddy something along the lines of "it's up to you, it's your island."  The "it's your island" part really got under my skin.  It's not his island!  Yes, he's done a lot of good there, but he's needed to infilitrate a local (Lamb's) life and live with her in order to stay there and do his work.  I feel his work is important, but I would have liked to see a little more respect paid to the local island dwellers and more light shed on the controversy  of his being there and distrupting the local economy.  Don't get me wrong I love the fact that he's saving the turtles, but I would have liked a more realistic view of the situation. 

 

 

 


 

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embersky_gemini
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

[ Edited ]

 >>>I feel she somewhat overstepped her bounds in taking ownership of the situation. <<<< (sorry I can't seem to quote right on these threads)

 

 

 

I did not feel that Mary was overstepping her bounds taking ownership of that situation. It is clear that the locals needed help, and did not know what to do to save the boy. Mary's strong personality along with her knowledge made her the person best suited to control that situation. In critical situations it is usually necessary to have one person calling the shots in order to do what needs to be done to save lives. If no one person was to take control people could go back in forth about what would or wouldn't be the best thing to do until it is to late. Life saving situations need to be acted on quickly.

 

 

I think the snorkel was used...yes just the mouthpiece to keep the mouth open for easier rescue breathing. Also in current CPR courses (i took one a couple years ago) mouth-to-mouth is not literally that anymore unless absolutely necessary. Because of the fear of disease transmission they now have plastic things to cover the victims mouth...sort of like mouth condoms for lack of a better word. A snorkel piece would be easier for people to wrap their mouths around and be easier to wipe off or sanitize(though it wasn't mentioned they did that). It may be easier to find lots of people willing to keep his breathing going when they just have to put their mouths to plastic, plus it would be easier to get a good seal around it. Easier on peoples comfort levels I purpose. Many people feel unsure about actually doing CPR when the time comes to it.

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mgmama33
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

 

Mary's mother:  I appreciated her attitude toward her daughter's illness, espec. since she is a pediatrician.  having worked in the medical field and with kids, it made sense to me.  Mary knew all along and had all the info available to her for what would happen to her.  She had already decided that she would live every day to the fullest and look forward, not back, so I was definitely ok with her Mom's attitude.  She knew she couldn't change Mary's mind but she also knew she had the illness and was prepared as a mom.

 

Our landscape changes dramatically in these brief chapters. How does the story change? Story became a peak into the other side of Mary's life and an interaction with Cobb, Mary, and Mary's brother. I enjoyed the change. Made me wish I could just rush off to a beautiful island and take it all in

 

Are you disturbed by Cobb not talking to Mary about her mother's revelation? Would it be easier to talk or to not talk about a loved one's sickness and death?

  I was not really disturbed by this as I feel that they had already decided how it was  going to be and had an understanding about it.  Cobb was going to stick by her no matter what and their love was strong enough for that, so no discussion needed.

 

When Ken Carter talks of going to school at St. Paul's, do you get a clearer idea of who Cobb is, or what ordinary life was like for him, just before the novel opened and he embarked on this adventure?

 Could've taken or left that part, but probably because I spent part of my childhood in the Northeast and understood how prep schools are.

 

 

Mary is mistaken for a doctor, and although she explains that she isn't, she also rises to the occasion, and saves a boy's life in Lombok. What do we see about Mary in these scenes? Does the story of saving the child shed any light on Mary's condition? Does it change your feelings about her sickness at all?

I think that Mary just has a giving heart and wants to give as much of herself as she can to others who need her before she is no longer on this earth.  She doesn't even flinch about helping.  She really is that caring and puts everyone else before herself.  This doesn't change my feelings about her sickness.

 

What impression do you have of the mother and son at the end of chapter ten, when they come to see Mary off, and offer her their gratitude?

I think this was great way to end the trip to Indonesia and show the compassion and gratefulness they have for her saving the boys life.  It is part of their culture to do this.

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Rockbottom
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

Chapter 9 finds Cobb going to see Mary's mother to learn about Mary's test results for Huntington's disease.  We learn that Mary's mom, a health care nurse, has known for a long time the outcome of her daughter's diagnois.  The mother is pragmatic and empathetic to Mary's way of dealing with her unknown future and potential deterioration.  The mother has had years to face her feelings as to what will happen to her daughter, so it is not a shock that she is complacent to the affects.  To Cobb who is struggling with the knowledge that Mary is positive, it's a much more impactful. 

 

Cobb understands Mary's will to not acknowledge her demise.  He respects it and does not reveal what he learns from her mother, which says a lot for his love and respect for Mary.  It would be tough most boyfriend's to not baby and show  telling emotion as to what he knows.  He has this long trip to Indonesia to come to terms with his relationship toward Mary, and determine if his life makes sense to continue and face changes Mary will endur.  The enchantment bubble that surrounds the couple on the river is carried forward with the surreal setting of the tropical island, and the turtle sanctuary that Mary's brother runs.

 

Duing their visit to Indonesia, Mary is faced with a young boy who is snake bitten and needs medical help.  Mary is the most knowledgeable about the situation as no doctor is available.  She demonstrates her don't-give-up attitude toward life when she suggests that people have to take turns breathing for the boy to allow his the chance to survive through the poisoning.  He boy, of course, pulls through and sees Mary off the island with a pledge of his life to her.  The child has a solemn sense of indebtness toward Mary for her life saving effort, and shows grace and pride of self in his pledge.

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sconcannon
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I like Mary's mother.  It must be extremely hard for her knowing that her daughter has the disease.  However, it is clear she respects her daughter and her daughter's attitude toward life because she is respecting her wish not to let her know she has the disease which must be so hard for her.  

"Yes she thought, laying down her brush in extreme fatigue, I have had my vision." - Virginia Woof, To the Lighthouse.
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sconcannon
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I am not surprise by the way Cobb acted after his discussion with Mary's mother.  He can't dwell on what he knows or Mary will see right through him.  He also will not be able to enjoy his time with Mary if he is too preoccupied with her illness. 

"Yes she thought, laying down her brush in extreme fatigue, I have had my vision." - Virginia Woof, To the Lighthouse.
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nbmars
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I liked Mary's mother too.  She came to terms with it, she coped, and she stayed strong.

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

 


Rachel-K wrote:

What is your impression of Mary's mother, and of her attitude toward Mary's illness?

I thought she was an amazing woman who showed courage in the way she approached the illness looming on the horizon and showed great strength in allowing both children to grow up as normally as possible without hovering like a helicopter.

Perhaps her nursing background gave her the added compassion and knowledge which allowed her to face her challenges because they were surely challenges for her too, as well has her family.

 

Our landscape changes dramatically in these brief chapters. How does the story change?

I did not like this part of the story as much as the first part. For me it progressed slowly since it seemed to get a bit caught up in the love scenes which didn't feel as pertinent to the tale as other moments were and felt redundant, at times. I wondered if there was a need to write a certain number of pages to act as a realistic bridge to the next section. Maybe when I read Wolves, I will understand why they were inserted into Indonesia so often.

From what Mr. Monninger wrote, I think it may be because for him it was primarily a love story and in my mind, it was that and so much more.


 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

edited by twj.....Are you disturbed by Cobb not talking to Mary about her mother's revelation? Would it be easier to talk or to not talk about a loved one's sickness and death?

Actually, if I remember that conversation accurately, I thought Cobb was a bit rude and overstepped his bounds because he was a relative stranger and reacted quite harshly and sarcastically.

When Ken Carter talks of going to school at St. Paul's, do you get a clearer idea of who Cobb is, or what ordinary life was like for him, just before the novel opened and he embarked on this adventure?

I think it served as a good introduction to the kind of character Mary's brother was and allowed us to imagine some of the written scenes more fully.

Mary is mistaken for a doctor, and although she explains that she isn't, she also rises to the occasion, and saves a boy's life in Lombok. What do we see about Mary in these scenes? Does the story of saving the child shed any light on Mary's condition? Does it change your feelings about her sickness at all?

I liked the miracle of the scene but I did not find the story credible, at first. Then, shortly after I read this part of the book, my mind was changed by my husband's aunt who forwarded a letter to me, from a doctor friend who went to Haiti to help out. This doctor has been performing any kind of service demanded of him...even amputations. He is a podiatrist, trained also in wound care. He has been rising to the occasion, as necessary, doing whatever he is called upon to do, as are all the other doctors with him, who have gone to Haiti to do what they can. There is little supervision or organization or supplies. Now, I believe that even in incredible circumstances, miracles can be accomplished.

What impression do you have of the mother and son at the end of chapter ten, when they come to see Mary off, and offer her their gratitude?

Their gratitude was genuine. They were humbled by the miracle that saved his life. They were simple people who understood that his life hung in the balance and it truly depended on the kindness of strangers. What would the outcome have been if Mary had not been there?

 

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Zia01
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I haven't read the above posts. I just finised up chapter 10 and want to respond while thoughts are fresh in my head.

 

What is your impression of Mary's mother, and of her attitude toward Mary's illness? I adored Mary's mother and her straight forwar attitude. I think she's been through this before and has had years to silently cope with what she know will eventually happens, so she had decided to live and love her while she can.

 

Our landscape changes dramatically in these brief chapters. How does the story change? For me it gave me more of a look at Mary and her family. I loved meeting her mother and Freddy.

 

Are you disturbed by Cobb not talking to Mary about her mother's revelation? Would it be easier to talk or to not talk about a loved one's sickness and death? I'm not disturbed by this. I think it would be a lot harder to discuss one's sickness. I wouldn't want to dwell on something like that.

 

When Ken Carter talks of going to school at St. Paul's, do you get a clearer idea of who Cobb is, or what ordinary life was like for him, just before the novel opened and he embarked on this adventure? Honestly? I didn't think it had much to do with the story. It did give a little bit of a backstory on Cobb but mostly it felt like filler material.

 

Mary is mistaken for a doctor, and although she explains that she isn't, she also rises to the occasion, and saves a boy's life in Lombok. What do we see about Mary in these scenes? Does the story of saving the child shed any light on Mary's condition? Does it change your feelings about her sickness at all? This part just shows us just how strong Mary really is in the face of adversary. It doesn't change my feelings about her being sick but it does show what a fighter she can be.

 

 

HBT
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HBT
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

BookWoman718 and Dhaupt,

 

I do understand why you both feel the way you do. I just come from a family who does not talk about our feelings. Maybe that is why I can relate to why Mary chose the choices she has made. I have lost family from illnesses, not HD but still the end was hard. They were trapped in the hospital even though they wanted to be in their homes or outside. I always thought that was not fair of the hospitals but I was just a kid so no one would listen to me. I know that if I were in Mary's shoes I would give my family the best time I can in the time I have, and I would expect them to let me live my life on my own terms. Even if I were to choose something they don't like. 

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rosia408
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

What is your impression of Mary's mother, and of her attitude toward Mary's illness?

 I thought that Mary's mother had come to terms with Mary's disease a very long time ago, when Mary was a child. Realizing that Mary was the kind of person that she was, she didn't want to inhibit her in any way from living her life. Once Mary was old enough and didn't want to know, she merely respected her wishes. Like she said, we were all dying, Mary's expiration date was just earlier.

Our landscape changes dramatically in these brief chapters. How does the story change?

I didn't feel like the story changed in any real way except for the setting. Mary and Cobb are still crazy in love and this continues to be somewhat of a honeymoon type setting for them. Cobb gets to me her brother Freddy and they both know deep down that it may be the last time she will get to see Freddy.

 

Are you disturbed by Cobb not talking to Mary about her mother's revelation? Would it be easier to talk or to not talk about a loved one's sickness and death?

No I was not disturbed by it at first, but as time went on, I must say that I was disturbed by this. Even though Mary said she didn't want to know, I feel that she really did know, and that this not talking about it was somewhat of a wall put up between them. I have know couples where one member was sick and felt she didn't want to burden the other with her sickness. The spouse ultimately felt left out. I believe that it was Mary's way though of dealing with it all and focusing on living and not dying. So, for her it was easier. For Cobb, though, he needed to talk about it.

 

When Ken Carter talks of going to school at St. Paul's, do you get a clearer idea of who Cobb is, or what ordinary life was like for him, just before the novel opened and he embarked on this adventure?

Yes I think that character serves to show how ordinary life was for Cobb before he met Mary. I think it also serves to make the reader reflect on how ordinary our own lives can be and ask if we are living our own lives to the fullest!

 

Mary is mistaken for a doctor, and although she explains that she isn't, she also rises to the occasion, and saves a boy's life in Lombok. What do we see about Mary in these scenes? Does the story of saving the child shed any light on Mary's condition? Does it change your feelings about her sickness at all?

It seemed that the whole episode about the saving of the boy's life was a bit contrived. I have had numerous trainings in CPR and first aid and wouldn't dream of doing a tracheotomy on anyone! I would probably do CPR, but only if no one else was around to do it. Not sure how noble that makes me sound. I don't know if that changes my feelings about her sickness. Just because she thinks she very probably may have a fatal illness, I doubt that she would want to see a child die. I think that is a strange question.

 

What impression do you have of the mother and son at the end of chapter ten, when they come to see Mary off, and offer her their gratitude?

I believe it is a universal feeling of immense gratitude toward a person who saves another person's life. Nothing unusual in that.

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jabrkeKB
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia


Rachel-K wrote:

What is your impression of Mary's mother, and of her attitude toward Mary's illness?

 She has had years to come to terms with it and is dealing with it in her own way.

Our landscape changes dramatically in these brief chapters. How does the story change?

 I don't feel that the story changed. I love the locale though, tropical island caring for turtles, where do I sign up?

Are you disturbed by Cobb not talking to Mary about her mother's revelation? Would it be easier to talk or to not talk about a loved one's sickness and death?

 I was not disturbed by Cobb, deep down I think he knows that Mary knows the truth. Personally, I think it is  easier to talk about sickness and death. I feel it helps people get through the process.

When Ken Carter talks of going to school at St. Paul's, do you get a clearer idea of who Cobb is, or what ordinary life was like for him, just before the novel opened and he embarked on this adventure?

 No

Mary is mistaken for a doctor, and although she explains that she isn't, she also rises to the occasion, and saves a boy's life in Lombok. What do we see about Mary in these scenes? Does the story of saving the child shed any light on Mary's condition? Does it change your feelings about her sickness at all?

 I give her credit for using the knowledge she has to help the boy. If she didn't step up then the boy would have died. It doesn't change my feelings about her sickness.

What impression do you have of the mother and son at the end of chapter ten, when they come to see Mary off, and offer her their gratitude?Just that they were very grateful.


 

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nlsamson
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I had one sister who died from complications with her leukemia... my other sister (also the oldest) had stage 4 breast cancer and opted for no chemo.. she spent her time preparing the rest of us for what she knew all along would be her death. Every day I am thankful for the choices she made, she gave the rest of us a gift that no one else could have. And in turn made her passing a beautiful experience. Yes we cried, we still mourn her almost 4 years later, but she still gave us a gift, alot like what I think Mary is trying to do, while not knowing for sure one way or another...

HBT wrote:

BookWoman718 and Dhaupt,

 

I do understand why you both feel the way you do. I just come from a family who does not talk about our feelings. Maybe that is why I can relate to why Mary chose the choices she has made. I have lost family from illnesses, not HD but still the end was hard. They were trapped in the hospital even though they wanted to be in their homes or outside. I always thought that was not fair of the hospitals but I was just a kid so no one would listen to me. I know that if I were in Mary's shoes I would give my family the best time I can in the time I have, and I would expect them to let me live my life on my own terms. Even if I were to choose something they don't like. 


"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away" - unknown
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lovetoreadLW
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

[ Edited ]

What is your impression of Mary's mother, and of her attitude toward Mary's illness?

 

Since Mary's mother is a nurse and lost her husband to the same disease, she knows what to expect. As a good mother, she is accepting her daughter's decision to live her life the way she chooses.

 

Our landscape changes dramatically in these brief chapters. How does the story change?

 

The scenery is gorgeous! I would love to experience the turtle release, it sounds amazing. We are getting insight into Mary's family and their acceptance of her choice and we get to see how Mary and Cobb react under extreme circumstances.

 

Are you disturbed by Cobb not talking to Mary about her mother's revelation? Would it be easier to talk or to not talk about a loved one's sickness and death?

 

It's Mary's choice and Cobb knew that going in. By showing up in Indonesia, he accepted her decision.

 

When Ken Carter talks of going to school at St. Paul's, do you get a clearer idea of who Cobb is, or what ordinary life was like for him, just before the novel opened and he embarked on this adventure?

 

No, I didn't get that at all.

 

Mary is mistaken for a doctor, and although she explains that she isn't, she also rises to the occasion, and saves a boy's life in Lombok. What do we see about Mary in these scenes? Does the story of saving the child shed any light on Mary's condition? Does it change your feelings about her sickness at all?

 

This whole scene seemed a little off. It felt a little MacGyver-like to me--a mask, snorkel, and duct tape? I did not get any insight on Mary's condition.

 

What impression do you have of the mother and son at the end of chapter ten, when they come to see Mary off, and offer her their gratitude?

 

It was expected, she did save the boy's life.

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emmagrace
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I like the the character of Mary"s mother. I can not imagine how hard it would be to have a child with a serious illness. I like that she seems to respect Mary's wishes.

 

The landscape changes to a beautiful island and for me the scene is more serene. Mary and Cobb seem to be at peace with their decision to move on with their lives together no matter what life has in store for them. I like the quote from Mary's mother on page. 153: " Concentrate on what is, not what can't be."  I also think that the quote from Frankie says it all on page 183: " But imagine how happy it would make you to know someone who loved you, someone who would stay beside you, would make sure the how and when were as graceful and gentle as possible. In that small way, Mary is luckier than we are." That was beautiful!

 

When Ken Carter talks about life at St.Paul's, I get the impression that Cobb's life was very routine and boring before he met Mary.

 

I loved the part when Mary saved the boy's life! She is such a strong woman in spite of her illness!

 

I was not expecting the boy and his mother to show up at the end of these chapters! This part made me cry like a baby : "He is pledging himself to you and your children. His life, in this time or next, will be overjoyed to see you. You two are bound. Your soul is not alone and it has been met"  What an honor that would be! I also liked where the mother had the baker sculpt rice cakes with the scene of Mary saving the boy's life.

 

I still think the story of Madrid is my favorite so far!

 

 

 

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Lildove3
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Re: Eternal on the Water: Chapters 9-10, Indonesia

I respect Mary's mom she's very much of a level headed lady, and she doesn't treat mary any

different, which in some respects is a good thing.

 

That was Mary's wishes not to talk about her illness, no matter what happens.

 

when Carter talks about school, I think Cobb takes a look bacj at school ect.

 

The mother and son are eternally greatful for what Mary has done..hats off to mary for that one!!!