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blkeyesuzi
Posts: 730
Registered: ‎01-26-2008
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Re: Favorite quotes

Yes, I was touched by that one, too (p. 28).  It's great, isn't it?

 

great choices on the others, btw!

 

 


DSaff wrote:

I don't know about the rest of you, but I have some favorite lines from this book.  =)  Some of them are:

 

pg. 28 "A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone."

 

pg. 152 "You don't value a fire any less because some day it will go out." (used as part of my review)

 

pg. 259 "Love, in other words, is built not only of the large and sweeping emotions each of us seeks, but, more important, to the level of everyday's most quiet need." 

 

pg. 312-313 Mary's retirement speech, esp. the third point

 


 

 

Suzi

"I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. " --John Burroughs
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ann1009961
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Last Thoughts

First, my apologies for not participating in this FL discussion.  We had the flu go through the house & consequently there wasn't a lot of time for reading while taking care of everyone!

 

Second, I finally did get to read it over the weekend and I truly loved!  It was wonderful love story, but also really so much more.  I agree with Tally-Wa about the "yeti" concept.  Call it karma, being in the right place at the right time,destiny, whatever, I think it is out there.  My husband & I had a chance meeting, "right place at the right time," and we have now been married for over 22 years.  Out of the millions of people in the world, how fortunate to meet that one person at that one particular time.  I also enjoyed the physical settings, taking into account that they are on the other side of the world from each other.

 

I loved Mary for her decision not to find out if she had the disease and to live life to the fullest.  She didn't let her illness control her life; she controlled it.

 

Kudos to Cobb for taking a chance and enjoying life with this woman if only for a short while.  None of us know when we will die.  One could walk out the front door and get hit by a bus.  

 

I think we should all be living life as Mary did, taking nothing for granted and knowing that there might not be a tomorrow, so live your life fully, do everything you can to enjoy it & love the people you are with. 

 

I cannot wait for my friends to read this.  I know they will enjoy it as much as I did.

Ann

"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us."
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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Favorite quotes

Thank you, Suzie. I love books that teach as well as entertain.  :smileywink:

 


blkeyesuzi wrote:

Yes, I was touched by that one, too (p. 28).  It's great, isn't it?

 

great choices on the others, btw!

 

 


DSaff wrote:

I don't know about the rest of you, but I have some favorite lines from this book.  =)  Some of them are:

 

pg. 28 "A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone."

 

pg. 152 "You don't value a fire any less because some day it will go out." (used as part of my review)

 

pg. 259 "Love, in other words, is built not only of the large and sweeping emotions each of us seeks, but, more important, to the level of everyday's most quiet need." 

 

pg. 312-313 Mary's retirement speech, esp. the third point

 


 

 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Frequent Contributor
deannafrances
Posts: 77
Registered: ‎07-19-2008

Re: Favorite quotes

I also feel sad that I did not get to post as much as I wanted--however my Yeti and I  were celebrating our 43rd wedding anniversary and his retirement with a trip to Sanibel Island in Florida for 2 weeks.  We have never taken a 2 week vacation before and it was glorious.  Then we returned to the frozen Michigan, I got some darn flu or respiratory  virus---however two days ago I began this glorious book.  I can barely express how much I loved this book.

 

I was a little suspicious when it started that it would be sad and full of illness that I would not be able to read it, instead it was a wonderful love story.  My husband and I were fortunate enough to have that "some enchanted evening" where we met at a Halloween party in 1966 and 2 weeks later, I was staying at his apartment as often as I could sneak out of the dorm and then we eloped in January just 3 months later.

We have raised 3 wonderful children and have 3 grandchildren and till this day when I see my husband unexpectedly my heart goes pitter pat.

 

i loved the sweetness of the relationship in this book and the tender beautiful love scenes.  I thought the 

other  characters were wonderful too.

 

it is hard to imagine saying that one believes in taking one's own life--and I cannot say what I would really do if I was in that circumstance, but I can understand Mary's feelings as I have dealt with medical problems that were not corrected correctly--and left me ill for a long time.

 

i loved the stories of the crows and in our home in rural MIchigan I have always felt rewarded that a crow family lives in the woods behind our house and the parents teach their young to eat bread and scraps I put out for them in the summer.

 

It was a wonderful book and First Look is a wonderful program.

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fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Last Thoughts

What stick with me most of this book is that even though Mary's death is a major part of the story, the real theme of the story is life.  We see how Mary lives going forward, never looking back, never placing blame.  We see how Freddy has made a unique life for himself and lives life to the fullest.  Frances learns that life is better than a suicide pack with a group of friends who don't understand life.  The Chungamunga girls find a little piece of life that they wouldn't be expected to experience.  Cobb went searching for Thorou, and found Mary and a way to appreciate life.  Even Cobb's father experiences life differently but fully.  Friendship and making the most of the life you have is the story line here.

MG

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momoftwinsMM
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎06-11-2009

Re: Last Thoughts

I agree about Mary & Cobb's relationship and I feel that it makes me think twice about how I react in my relationships (esp. with my husband). If I knew my time was short, would this incident provoke such a response? It reminds me to take a step back, and think, is a fight really worth it? Can we discuss this as two people who may disagree, but who love each other regardless?

Distinguished Wordsmith
MSaff
Posts: 272
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Last Thoughts

  Hi Everyone,

 

  I must say that I was more than pleasantly surprised when I first opened EOTW.  The book and story captured my attention right from the start and I really had a hard time putting it down.  The author's writing style, at least for me is wonderful and captivating.  I really enjoyed every part of the book. 

 

  As for any scene or section of the book that will stick with me, I have to say it was the scenes on the Allagash.  First when Mary and Cobb met and the river became one of the characters to me.  The most important scene that will remain in my subconscious will probably be at the end when the Chungamunga Girls were coming down the river for Mary.  I must say that that scene was extremely compelling. 

 

  Thanks again B&N and First Look, as well as everyone involved in the discussion.  It is always a pleasure to be a part of such a great bunch of people. 

 

  Happy Reading

 

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
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kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: Last Thoughts

 

I've mentioned that I didn't particularly like this book.  I do agree with Tally-wa about the concept of "yeti love".  I can relate to this and appreciated that two people could find one another and have this immediate connection.  I personally have thought of this in relation to my own husband- if I hadn't walked in looking for work, if he hadn't changed universities.....
It does say a lot about the author when I can pick out favorite passages when I didn't care for the book.
Another of my favorite parts was at the end when Cobb is going down the river holding on to Mary's kayak.  He lets go and then has to grab hold for a little longer.  Touches my heart again as I write it.
Kathy

Tally-wa wrote:

Eternal on the Water was so much more than I ever expected.

The whole "yeti love" concept made me laugh and when Mary explained you have to be in the "same universe, the same continent, same country, same state, same county, same place, same time, same general time period & usually speak the same language, etc" it really grabbed me. I'd never thought of the odds of love so scientifically; it totally gave me an epiphany about it all. How lucky we are to be able to meet the people we might never have met had we just been a couple minutes late.

That's what will stick with me the most: the absurdity and awesomeness of it all. The love we find without looking, and the people we feel connected to from the moment we meet.


 

 

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Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Last Thoughts


blkeyesuzi wrote:

I have to say that I agree whole heartedly with you.  My husband I fell for each other at the moment we laid eyes on each other.  the way we describe it, we were like two springs that just intertwined and we've been that way from the beginning.  We have a beatiful relationship and live each day to the fullest.  We've been faced with an illness and choose to face it head-on and not allow it to stop us.  We live every day like a celebration.  It has certainly caused us to take stock of our time together and our time in general.  We live in the moment as the characters did so well.  We try not to worry about the past or what may loom in the future.  As a matter of fact, we just went horseback riding yesterday and it was such a glorious day.  No worries, only smiles and sunshine.  If we had let it, we'd have had plenty to worry about.  It's this kind of relationship I loved in the characters in Eternal on the Water.  You may be right, some may say relationships like that don't exist.  But, I know for a fact that they do.  I loved this book and its relationships.

 

 

 


kstempien wrote:

I enjoyed the entire book, so it's kind of hard to pick just one, or a few, things that will stick with me, because I think much of it will. There are many things that I enjoyed: the characters, the events, the bonds (family, friends, love) and would like to keep with me in rememberence of the story itself.

 

One of the things that sticks out to me is the relationship that Mary and Cobb had. I know many readers have said that it just didn't seem realistic to them, since they fell in love so quickly, and everything just seemed to be too perfect. I can say that I agree with you in feeling that way. But, I also remember that it's a story in itself, but could still be a part of life. Maybe their relationship was just that lucky one, where they had nothing to worry about and it was perfect. I know we're all not as lucky in reality, but it could happen. For Mary and Cobb, there was an immediate attraction, and it just blossomed from there. There were no fights, no being mad at each other, no other downfalls, but I believe that's because the concentration was lying on the aspect of Mary's illness. The concern was for Mary's health and Cobb's dedication to be by her side regardless. He was attracted to her personality, and I think the rest just developed from there. Their relationship was based on attraction, beliefs, inspirations, etc. Refusing to let Mary's condition come between them, they may the best with the time they had together.

 

I also admire Mary's willpower to live her life not knowing whether or not she in fact has the disease. She is strong willed, and has the backbone to live her life regardless. She's not wasting away the remainder of her life wondering what if, or being down and feeling sorry, she's continuing to live, accomplishing what she can in the time she has. Knowing she may or may not be inhibited by the symptoms, she continues to plow through life, without letting the possibility get the best of her. I guess I feel strongly about this because I can relate personally. Given my situation, I feel as though it's best right now to not know. Smart? Dumb? We may all have our own opinions on that, but it's just the way I chose to deal with it. I just feel that, without knowing, I'm kind of like Mary, continuing to live my life regardless. I have the feeling that knowing something, specifically something with a negative impact, would cause me to turn my outlook on my life downward. Don't get me wrong, when the right time comes, I will find out what is necessary to know, but for now, I'm keeping with Mary's personality, it is much easier to go through life with the 'blank slate'. I can say it's not always easy, but it is easier!


 

 

 


I agree with you both - I loved the way Mary and Cobb live their lives to the absolute fullest. It was truly inspiring.

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Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Last Thoughts

This book is full of important and memorable scenes, but I agree with you, Mike - this was one of the most compelling.


MSaff wrote:

 

 The most important scene that will remain in my subconscious will probably be at the end when the Chungamunga Girls were coming down the river for Mary.  I must say that that scene was extremely compelling. 

 

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nfam
Posts: 231
Registered: ‎01-08-2007
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Re: Last Thoughts

For me, the most amazing part of the book was the way the author used nature as almost another character. The emotion evoked by the descriptions of the natural environment were exceptional. What a great book!

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jb70
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎07-06-2009
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Re: Last Thoughts

I think my favorite line was this one:

"Life is so funny. So strange, really. It happens all around you and you can only see this little frame, this moment, and then it goes on. And you never know who is going to star in your life movie. It's always a surprise."
from page 322.  It is so true!

http://bookbookseverywhere.blogspot.com/
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rosia408
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎12-01-2009
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Re: Last Thoughts

I had forgotten how much a book could make me cry, laugh, feel! It was an amazing read!

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coffee_luvr
Posts: 171
Registered: ‎10-29-2009
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Re: Last Thoughts

 


dhaupt wrote:

I enjoyed all the different settings of the book immensely and felt very a part of the wilderness. I also loved the feeling of family and not all in the traditional sense either. 

 


I agree! 

 

 

Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. ~Barbara Tuchman
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inkslngr
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-05-2009

Re: Last Thoughts

The many expressions of love that were displayed in this book will stay with me for a very long time.  Mary's family and friends came together at the very end to say their goodbyes and to help her carry out her last wishes.  Cobb probably had the hardest job of all and he carried it out so well.  It brings tears to my eyes to remember the end of the book. 

 

There wasn't much discussion about the end of life decisions on the site.  I found this a very prominent theme in the book.  I think as a society we allow our animals a more dignified ending to their lives than we do our loved ones.  When someone is in the spot that Mary was in, I think it is the kindest and most loving thing that we can do for them when they feel it is time for them to leave this world.  But, law says that it is illegal.  We go to such extremes to keep people alive at the end of their life cycle and it does not change the outcome.  It has only brought them more pain and suffering.  I love that Cobb was able to understand and accept what Mary had decided to do at the end of her life.

 

Joe did a fantastic job on this book and I am looking forward to reading more from him.  Thank you Barnes and Noble and Joe for letting me take part in this adventure.  I am glad that I did.

 

 

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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Last Thoughts

I know what you mean! A book that makes you feel your emotions is a hit.  :smileyhappy:

 


rosia408 wrote:

I had forgotten how much a book could make me cry, laugh, feel! It was an amazing read!


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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JuneC
Posts: 44
Registered: ‎12-01-2009
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Re: Last Thoughts

The images or scenes relating to the window and it's installation may seem like an odd choice for one to "stick with " me, but as I might have mentioned in a post, it brought back so many memories of making my first house into a home.  Books are that way. Sometimes it's the overall theme and sometimes just one moment that can create the emotion.

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Last Thoughts

I would like to share an experience with you I had about 10 years ago.

 

My older sister was big into meditation for many years and studied with Shinzen Young, a meditation teacher in the Budhist tradition.  Unfortunately when my sister was diagnosed with cancer, it was already in the advanced stages and the prognosis was not good.  Shinzen worked with her and other terminal patients, explaining pain management and how to maintain inner peace given their circumstances.  She held a meeting in her home towards the end and talked about the experience of dying to other terminal patients.  From what I understand, it is an honor to host one of these gatherings.  Since she decided rather suddenly to have this and airline schedules were not as accommodating as I had hoped (I had to fly from NJ to CA), I arrived at the very end of the meeting.  Because my sister had been a student of Shinzen Young for so many years, he very graciously agreed to come back the next day and talk with me.  He spent a few hours just talking about life, dying and the hereafter.  After he left, my sister and I continued the discussion well into the night.  All of a sudden, I felt her spirit floating high above us on, of all things, like a magic carpet.  To this day, I can still visualize this.  She told me the end was near and that her spirit had just left her body.  A few hours later she went into a coma and died two days later.  From what I was told by many of the attendees at her Celebration of Life service, when someone hosts a meeting on dying, that person usually passes within four days and it was on the fourth day that she passed.  One of my sister's last requests was to have a select group of people around her bedside all touching her and her friend playing her favorite song on the guitar and this was done.  Needless to say, reading about Mary at the end brought back a lot of emotions for me.  I went through tragic circumstances back in 1999 and could relate somewhat to Mary's and Cobb's last hours together. 

 

I remember that one of the FL participants was recently diagnosed with cancer and I apologize if I upset you or anyone else.  My only intention was to share an experience with everyone.

Wordsmith
Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
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Re: Last Thoughts

Thank you for sharing your sister's story, literature.  I'm so glad you got to be there. 

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ilenekm
Posts: 71
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Last Thoughts

This was a terrific book.  The descriptions were very vivid. It made me feel like I was on the river or with the sea turtles.  Thank you first look for allowing me to participate.