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PB684
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Registered: ‎08-03-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


JuneC wrote:

Mr. Monninger, 

Not being familiar with the Rock Hudson movie All That Heaven Allows a friend and I checked youtube.  Sure enough there was the trailer. The window is in a few scenes and beautiful it is!   We were wondering how you came to use this in your book.  Is there a particular meaning you attribute to the window? 

I related to the renovation and the installation scene in the book.  It brought back wonderful memories of my first house and the people who helped us make it a home.


 

Isn't it funny how we picture things in book? I just watched that trailer and I had a completely different image of the window in my head! I don't know why but I pictured a window with an arched top, kind of Palladian in style. I'll have to go back and read the description in the book to see why I thought that:smileyvery-happy:

Paula

PB684
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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Good old Rock Hudson!  A movie nut friend told me about this film and I watched it a few years back...and was charmed by it.  I could go on and on about it, but I loved the building they went to....when Rock and Jane Wyman become involved.  They smooched by the window.  Then there was a deer outside it.  (It's been a few years....)  Anyway, I like Churchill's idea that we create our buildings, then our building create us.  My family lives in a converted barn and I am aware of light and shape and height.  The window in EOTW was some sort of strange outgrowth of the barn...and buildings.  Does that make any sense?  Probably not.

 

Thanks for a great question.  If you get a chance, watch the entire movie.  It really suggest something of the 1960's....just the opening seeds, as it were.  


PB684 wrote:

JuneC wrote:

Mr. Monninger, 

Not being familiar with the Rock Hudson movie All That Heaven Allows a friend and I checked youtube.  Sure enough there was the trailer. The window is in a few scenes and beautiful it is!   We were wondering how you came to use this in your book.  Is there a particular meaning you attribute to the window? 

I related to the renovation and the installation scene in the book.  It brought back wonderful memories of my first house and the people who helped us make it a home.


 

Isn't it funny how we picture things in book? I just watched that trailer and I had a completely different image of the window in my head! I don't know why but I pictured a window with an arched top, kind of Palladian in style. I'll have to go back and read the description in the book to see why I thought that:smileyvery-happy:

Paula


 

 

 

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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

Interesting question about pirating books.  I guess that can happen.  I once heard that Stephen King novels are routinely ripped off in Asia.  Not sure if that is true...or if it's fair to Asia.  When you think about it, though, libraries also run afoul of copyright.  By lending books out -- not mine, but think how many "reads" a guy like King or Dr. Seus loses to libraries -- they sort of usurp the author's cut on the exchange.  In England and New Zealand they have something called a public lending incentive which tracks "borrows" from libraries.  At the end of the year, an author is cut a modest check.  Books are one of the few things we give out free to the public (well, they come from taxes, but you get the idea.)  It might make sense to have a fair policy for the life of the book and the author's family, then turn it over to the public domain...and to libraries.  So, in answer to your question, I'm less concerned about pirating electronic copies than you might have guessed.  

 

What do you think?  Publishing is a vast enterprise, believe me....

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Ouch, to these assumptions, Joe! Libraries don't run afoul of copyright. The US Copyright Office is actually a division of the Library of Congress. Our daily functioning depends on copyright and fair use laws. Libraries in the US are often at the helm in fighting for fair use and public rights to information. Libraries often also pay more for their materials than individuals do because of the multiple uses.

 

I read a Library Journal article that claimed libraries account for about 10 percent of the book market, and for about 40 percent of children's' book sales. That's not accounting for the role that libraries and librarians have in creating basic literacy--and in shaping the reading interests and habits that make up the rest of the "market."  Getting onto library shelves is good news for an author!

 

Stephen King and Dr. Seuss owe these institutions a debt of gratitude, and not the other way around! I'll sit back down now and be quiet. My half-glasses just got a bit steamed.

 

I have to throw in that I had the chance to talk up ETOW to a local book group I visited just this week! My favorite part of being a librarian.

 

 

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PB684
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

Good old Rock Hudson!  A movie nut friend told me about this film and I watched it a few years back...and was charmed by it.  I could go on and on about it, but I loved the building they went to....when Rock and Jane Wyman become involved.  They smooched by the window.  Then there was a deer outside it.  (It's been a few years....)  Anyway, I like Churchill's idea that we create our buildings, then our building create us.  My family lives in a converted barn and I am aware of light and shape and height.  The window in EOTW was some sort of strange outgrowth of the barn...and buildings.  Does that make any sense?  Probably not.

 

Thanks for a great question.  If you get a chance, watch the entire movie.  It really suggest something of the 1960's....just the opening seeds, as it were.  


PB684 wrote:

JuneC wrote:

Mr. Monninger, 

Not being familiar with the Rock Hudson movie All That Heaven Allows a friend and I checked youtube.  Sure enough there was the trailer. The window is in a few scenes and beautiful it is!   We were wondering how you came to use this in your book.  Is there a particular meaning you attribute to the window? 

I related to the renovation and the installation scene in the book.  It brought back wonderful memories of my first house and the people who helped us make it a home.


 

Isn't it funny how we picture things in book? I just watched that trailer and I had a completely different image of the window in my head! I don't know why but I pictured a window with an arched top, kind of Palladian in style. I'll have to go back and read the description in the book to see why I thought that:smileyvery-happy:

Paula


 

 

 


 

Sounds like a movie I'll have to add to my Netflix queue but it will have to wait awhile due to the fact that every DVD player in my house simultaneously self-destructed last week:smileyvery-happy:

Paula

PB684
Author
Joseph-Monninger
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hmmmm.  Okay, I'm hearing you, but I think you missed the thrust of my argument.  By all means, libraries are a force for good.  And MANY authors benefit by library acquisitions.  That point is conceded.  But Dr. Seuss or Stephen King lose money (I don't have the figures in front of me, but you get where I'm going....)  If you buy one book for $25 and lend it out 100 times....how does the author benefit by that?  Maybe I am all befuddled, but I can't see the math working in the author's favor.  It's not an either-or proposition.  Let's lend the book out, but pay living authors something.  Libraries, because they generally work for good causes, are not subject to some of the criticisms concerning copyright. That's the thinking in England and New Zealand, anyway.

 

Maybe I am all wet.  Wouldn't be the first time.  And I understand authors with moderate sales live on library sales.  (The young adult market, with the exception of Twilight, relies heavily on libraries.)  So, I am ready to be educated....but no one says libraries don't work for good causes.  But they give out books for free..

 

As you can guess, though, I give tons of readings in libraries.  I'm a fan...and that's where literature and books live....AND I LOVE LIBRARIANS, so please don't misunderstand me.....I'm coming to your library if you would just invite me.  And I still say Lie-Berry, which makes everyone around me cringe.

 

 

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PB684
Posts: 182
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

Hmmmm.  Okay, I'm hearing you, but I think you missed the thrust of my argument.  By all means, libraries are a force for good.  And MANY authors benefit by library acquisitions.  That point is conceded.  But Dr. Seuss or Stephen King lose money (I don't have the figures in front of me, but you get where I'm going....)  If you buy one book for $25 and lend it out 100 times....how does the author benefit by that?  Maybe I am all befuddled, but I can't see the math working in the author's favor.  It's not an either-or proposition.  Let's lend the book out, but pay living authors something.  Libraries, because they generally work for good causes, are not subject to some of the criticisms concerning copyright. That's the thinking in England and New Zealand, anyway.

 

Maybe I am all wet.  Wouldn't be the first time.  And I understand authors with moderate sales live on library sales.  (The young adult market, with the exception of Twilight, relies heavily on libraries.)  So, I am ready to be educated....but no one says libraries don't work for good causes.  But they give out books for free..

 

As you can guess, though, I give tons of readings in libraries.  I'm a fan...and that's where literature and books live....AND I LOVE LIBRARIANS, so please don't misunderstand me.....I'm coming to your library if you would just invite me.  And I still say Lie-Berry, which makes everyone around me cringe.

 

 


 

Hahahaha! If Rachel doesn't take you up on the offer to visit her lie-berry I will:smileyvery-happy:

PB684
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Mr. Monninger,

If someone wanted to contact you to speak to a group, how would they do it? Do you have a fee schedule?

twj

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coffee_luvr
Posts: 171
Registered: ‎10-29-2009

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 


Rachel-K wrote:

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

Interesting question about pirating books.  I guess that can happen.  I once heard that Stephen King novels are routinely ripped off in Asia.  Not sure if that is true...or if it's fair to Asia.  When you think about it, though, libraries also run afoul of copyright.  By lending books out -- not mine, but think how many "reads" a guy like King or Dr. Seus loses to libraries -- they sort of usurp the author's cut on the exchange.  In England and New Zealand they have something called a public lending incentive which tracks "borrows" from libraries.  At the end of the year, an author is cut a modest check.  Books are one of the few things we give out free to the public (well, they come from taxes, but you get the idea.)  It might make sense to have a fair policy for the life of the book and the author's family, then turn it over to the public domain...and to libraries.  So, in answer to your question, I'm less concerned about pirating electronic copies than you might have guessed.  

 

What do you think?  Publishing is a vast enterprise, believe me....

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Ouch, to these assumptions, Joe! Libraries don't run afoul of copyright. The US Copyright Office is actually a division of the Library of Congress. Our daily functioning depends on copyright and fair use laws. Libraries in the US are often at the helm in fighting for fair use and public rights to information. Libraries often also pay more for their materials than individuals do because of the multiple uses.

 

I read a Library Journal article that claimed libraries account for about 10 percent of the book market, and for about 40 percent of children's' book sales. That's not accounting for the role that libraries and librarians have in creating basic literacy--and in shaping the reading interests and habits that make up the rest of the "market."  Getting onto library shelves is good news for an author!

 

Stephen King and Dr. Seuss owe these institutions a debt of gratitude, and not the other way around! I'll sit back down now and be quiet. My half-glasses just got a bit steamed.

 

I have to throw in that I had the chance to talk up ETOW to a local book group I visited just this week! My favorite part of being a librarian.

 

 


 

 

 I am not a librarian, on a board or connected in any way politically to a library; however I have been a frequent user of libraries in every town I have lived.  I agree with Rachel-K; I am surprised that there is any feeling but positive towards these wonderful institutions.  I have been introduced to many authors that I would not have read if I had to "buy" every one before I could read it.  I would only stick to the tried and true authors.  After reading a book by not an overly popular author, Patrick McManus, I then bought several of his books and am always on the look out for another.  His works are not always in the book stores either.  He is a humorist and I fell in love with his style.  Since discovering his works in the library, I introduced his writing to my husband and my son (neither one much of a reader) and to my brother who is the most well read person I know. 

I never would have purchased works by this author had I not stumbled across one of his really early books in the library!

Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. ~Barbara Tuchman
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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi Joe,

 

I wouldn't mistake the author of a love story between academics for an author who doesn't support libraries!

 

And the word "lieberry" is obviously much better because it sounds like a fruit. 

 

I'd still argue that if 10% of King and 40% of Seuss sales are to us, we're adding and not subtracting. Libraries replace the copies that get worn out, torn up, and accidentally absorbed by personal collections, etc.

 

What percentage of those check outs would have been sales if the copy hadn't been on our shelves? I can't imagine how to figure it.  At least some are by folks who wouldn't or couldn't buy if they didn't have access, and other check-outs are by folks who may wind up giving that particular book as a gift every holiday. (Oh, the Places You'll Go is a great graduation present). I know the closest brick Barnes and Noble is nearly across the street from my branch, and is the surest place to find our patrons if they aren't wandering our stacks.

 

Coffee luvr makes a good point. Libraries as a wine-tasting for readers wanting to find new authors. Or even better, remember how we used to be warned as kids that drug dealers would let you "try" illegal drugs for free just to get you hopelessly hooked? Maybe this is sort of what libraries do for the book world!

 

Your book tour will rival a Stones tour if you put the word out here! I can't speak for our county, but I'm certain we'd like to invite you in NC, and I think we've got most US states, Brazil and England and a couple of other spots on the globe covered on these boards!

 

 

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Sadie1
Posts: 74
Registered: ‎07-16-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

I'm interested in your comments because again books are privileged over movies.  I teach with a woman who would argue that everything is a text....even shopping circulars.  She would say, I think, that we don't know for sure if we are reading the same book.  When you read Eternal on the Water, you bring to bear all your past experience and knowledge.  So do I when I read books.  But does the text remain the same?  My goodness, when you consider some of the reviews a book gets -- even right here in First Look Country -- you can see people read through a lens they make themselves.  

 

If we grant that books mean different things to different people, then why stop there?  If we supply the details with our imagination, why not simply read an outline of a book....and fill it in with our own interpretations?  I had a friend who read book jackets for two months and engaged people in conversation.  In time he couldn't remember if he had actually read the book or simply read the jacket.  He invented the entire book, you see.  And during the conversation, he believed the two people discussing the book came up with a third meaning of the book....a shared vision of it.

 

I dare say a good documentary could teach us as much about the history of baseball (again Ken Burns) as a book on the same subject.  And as to imagination....Avatar certainly stirred my imagination with its visual rendering of the world.  So did Lord of the Rings years ago.  My son read the Hobbit and loved it, but he found the other Ring books slow going.  So he watched the movies.  Did he really miss something?  Or did he have the same experience...or close enough....as someone who read them all?  Could you watch the Harry Potter movies and have roughly the same experience as those who have read them?  I would argue maybe....

 

Anyway, provocative questions and ideas.  I like talking about this stuff.  I wrote a column for years about common, everyday topics mostly revolving around education.  I am against homework, for instance, and that always got people going.  

 

Thanks again for airing your views.  I'd love to hear more....


Sadie1 wrote:

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns doc


I think watching a movie isn't the same as reading a book.  No where near the same.  I have a 17 year old.  I taught him to read books from a very young age.  He spends his hard earned lawn mowing money now on books.  He does have a healthy supply of video games too.  But, he reads and he loves to read.
Books allow us to build up our imaginations.  Movies don't.  Movies have the scenery all there for us.  But a book allows us to imagine that scenery in our own minds.  We need to use our brains or we are going to lose them, so when I read a book, I am using those brain cells.  Watching a movie, my brain is numbed out some.
Also, due to time restraints, movies cut a lot out that can be included in a book.
I don't care to read ebooks.  I enjoy having that book in my hands.  I can just see me know laying in bed with a computer in my hands reading..when I fall asleep and that computer drops to the floor, it's going to break.  The book will be okay in the morning and it also won't wake me up when it crashes to the floor.  LOL!
Lisa in Georgia

 

 

 

Obviously, this will have a big impact on education.  Believe me, I'm not saying we shouldn't read.  I am simply wondering out loud if visual stimulation through movies and so on isn't the equivalent.  Could a person be "well educated" (whatever that means exactly) by simply watching movies?  


Joe, I think the lady is correct.  There's my view, the other persons view and the shared view with everything.  There's 3 sides to every story.
I had to read "The Hobbit" in 7th grade back in 1977.  I went on to read, "The Lord of The Rings" on my own after that.  I too have seen the movies and own the movies..bought them for my son.  I enjoyed the movies as much as the books.
My son and I started out reading the Harry Potter books when he was in 3rd grade.  Each time a new one came out, we read it.  Then along came the movies, we own them too.  These movies were very close to the book.  Not all movies are as close to the books.
My son had an AP Literature class last year.  He had to read lot's of books.  I bought the books for him, I borrowed copies from the library for myself.  He read his, I read the library ones at the same time.  We had our own book discussions.  I gound it very interesting to compare notes with his then 15 year old mind to my 43 year old mind.  He often picked up on things that I didn't pick up on.  One book was The Road.  Very good story too.  We are now going to see that movie and compare notes to what we read.  It will be interesting to see what's there.
I also want to mention something about the library loaner system.  I appreciate the library.  It helped me while my son was reading.  I can't buy two of the same books.  It also affords a way to read for kids and adults alike that can't afford books.  We are not all on the same level.  Some need the library.
I also am very much involved with helping charities in 3rd world countries.  I make quilts..they need blankets along with books.  I have also donated books to them.  The ebooks would be impossible to the people in the locations I have helped. They have to wash the quilts in the creeks.  So, let's keep the books.  Let's keep the libraries.  There is a need.  Just because we might not see the need for ourselves, the need is out there.
I do love a good documentary.  Love true stories too in books.  History was my worse subject in school.  So, a good documentary based on true facts is good for me at times.
People have mentioned children with learning disabilities and having difficulties with books versus movies and electronics.  Well, I am ADD and so is my son.  It takes training on what works for the individual to overcome some of the learning disabilities.  I am a 4.0 at the college I attended...no ADD meds were used.  My son is a 4.0 as a Senior in high school.  So, even with learning disabilities, challenges can be met. 
My son was very fortunate to have an ex-special ed teacher in the 2nd grade and again, another one for 3rd grade.  Each of these ladies taught me how to teach my son.  Get them into chapter, adventure books..works very well for boys with ADD.  Also, the video games that are adventure RPG games were recommended.  There's a lot of reading to do on those games.
Anyway, I would love to see ETOW made into a movie.  I can also see it as an Oprah pick.  I can also see it as a book for an AP Literature class.  Very thought provoking book you have there.
Lisa i Georgia

 

 

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Zia01
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

I don't have a question. I just wanted to say thank you.

 

Thank you for writing such a touching love story that will stay with me for a long time.  Thank you for all the wonderful animal lore and stories you told. Thank you for the Chungamunga girls, Wally, Francis, Freddy and the rest of their family and friends. But most importantly, thank you for sharing Mary and Cobb's story with us!

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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

A ha!  This is an answer to the suggestion that a library serves as a "wine tasting" of authors.  Bad analogy, I say.  After you taste wines, no one gives them out for free.  In fact, I'd love a wine library.  It's great if someone comes across a book in a library and then goes on to buy other works by the same author.  But the argument rests on the premise that libraries must function as they do today....lending out living authors' work for free.  I'll be satisfied and be quiet if you can name one other industry whose output is handed out for free -- without paying the creators -- by the government.  I wish they had plumber libraries or dentist libraries.  I merely suggest that we pay authors -- living authors, not in the public domain -- a fee when their books are borrowed.  (The Author's Guild has been suggesting this for years....) As Americans, however, we have a very deep sense that libraries must be free.  And by the way, the Nook, if I understand it correctly, permits 14 day "shares" of electronic books.  I'm not sure how that all works out, but that is not supported by tax dollars.  And it is a sort of wine tasting...

 

Okay, I am becoming a bore on this subject.  Sorry.  And I am coming to NC in March to speak to the Baker-Tayler conference...librarians!  Believe me, I share your love of libraries....some of my happiest hours have been spent there.  But I do know that libraries pay healthy subscriptions for the NY Times and other on-line periodicals and archives.  Why is a book different from a newspaper in that sense?

 

I love talking about these kinds of things...


Rachel-K wrote:

Hi Joe,

 

I wouldn't mistake the author of a love story between academics for an author who doesn't support libraries!

 

And the word "lieberry" is obviously much better because it sounds like a fruit. 

 

I'd still argue that if 10% of King and 40% of Seuss sales are to us, we're adding and not subtracting. Libraries replace the copies that get worn out, torn up, and accidentally absorbed by personal collections, etc.

 

What percentage of those check outs would have been sales if the copy hadn't been on our shelves? I can't imagine how to figure it.  At least some are by folks who wouldn't or couldn't buy if they didn't have access, and other check-outs are by folks who may wind up giving that particular book as a gift every holiday. (Oh, the Places You'll Go is a great graduation present). I know the closest brick Barnes and Noble is nearly across the street from my branch, and is the surest place to find our patrons if they aren't wandering our stacks.

 

Coffee luvr makes a good point. Libraries as a wine-tasting for readers wanting to find new authors. Or even better, remember how we used to be warned as kids that drug dealers would let you "try" illegal drugs for free just to get you hopelessly hooked? Maybe this is sort of what libraries do for the book world!

 

Your book tour will rival a Stones tour if you put the word out here! I can't speak for our county, but I'm certain we'd like to invite you in NC, and I think we've got most US states, Brazil and England and a couple of other spots on the globe covered on these boards!

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Dear Joseph..Living in a small Vt. town with an exceptional library ,Mark Skinner Library..Manchester,Vt..I must say that we have never as taxpayers turned down a request for funding.We also give out of our own pockets,magazine subscriptions,new books,etc.We have enormous Library  Book Sales to help with the funding.I cherished reading "Eternal on the Water",emailed Mark Skinner to buy a few copies,I know all the Library Staff.This is certainly not the forum to speak about how much authors receive,or don't receive.because ,yes Library's do give out books for free..I really don't care about  what authors receive or don't receive..I will share my copy of "Eternal on the Water",and will,buy a few for gifts,but in this economy,how can you expect us to wrap our brains around your and your publishers profit margin..Vtc  Susan ..I also frequent The Dorset Library..which is a much smaller version of Mark Skinner...

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Author
Joseph-Monninger
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Just trying to keep things interesting...and perhaps to make us think about books in a different way.  That's all.  I'm waiting to talk about the end of the novel...which I hope brings up a host of conversations....


Vermontcozy wrote:

Dear Joseph..Living in a small Vt. town with an exceptional library ,Mark Skinner Library..Manchester,Vt..I must say that we have never as taxpayers turned down a request for funding.We also give out of our own pockets,magazine subscriptions,new books,etc.We have enormous Library  Book Sales to help with the funding.I cherished reading "Eternal on the Water",emailed Mark Skinner to buy a few copies,I know all the Library Staff.This is certainly not the forum to speak about how much authors receive,or don't receive.because ,yes Library's do give out books for free..I really don't care about  what authors receive or don't receive..I will share my copy of "Eternal on the Water",and will,buy a few for gifts,but in this economy,how can you expect us to wrap our brains around your and your publishers profit margin..Vtc  Susan ..I also frequent The Dorset Library..which is a much smaller version of Mark Skinner...


 

 

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,827
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi Joe, just a quick comment about libraries. First of all I serve on the board of directors for my library district.

Think of all the services the libraries provide for the general public, so say a guy walks in and gets a tax form and there's you book sitting on the display shelf and he says wow I've never heard of this guy and this book looks great. So he checks it out, loves it and goes to the nearest B&N and buys copies of all your books and sends some for gifts to family and friends too. :womanwink:

 

Here's also a new book that was just published by HarperCollins:

 

 

This Book Is Overdue! 

 

About libraries, librarians and the people who visit the library.

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Vt cozy wrote..Fondest 1 million,Library moments,ok here is a VT one..had seen "Kafka on the Shore" took it out,wound up buying 4 copies for Holiday and one Bday gift..I was so taken with his writing...so many Library moments..Grammer school NYC,College,My most favorite,the winner moment for me is bringing my daughter to "Storytime" at our library in Upstate NY..She was 2,but had to be 3yrs old..She sat,listened and I think I had  tears of joy....Vtc...
dhaupt wrote:

Hi Joe, just a quick comment about libraries. First of all I serve on the board of directors for my library district.

Think of all the services the libraries provide for the general public, so say a guy walks in and gets a tax form and there's you book sitting on the display shelf and he says wow I've never heard of this guy and this book looks great. So he checks it out, loves it and goes to the nearest B&N and buys copies of all your books and sends some for gifts to family and friends too. :womanwink:

 

Here's also a new book that was just published by HarperCollins:

 

 

This Book Is Overdue! 

 

About libraries, librarians and the people who visit the library.


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Distinguished Correspondent
coffee_luvr
Posts: 171
Registered: ‎10-29-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Mongering


Joseph-Mongering wrote:

A ha!  This is an answer to the suggestion that a library serves as a "wine tasting" of authors.  Bad analogy, I say.  After you taste wines, no one gives them out for free.  In fact, I'd love a wine library.  It's great if someone comes across a book in a library and then goes on to buy other works by the same author.  But the argument rests on the premise that libraries must function as they do today...Lending out living authors' work for free.  I'll be satisfied and be quiet if you can name one other industry whose output is handed out for free -- without paying the creators -- by the government.  I wish they had plumber libraries or dentist libraries.  I merely suggest that we pay authors -- living authors, not in the public domain -- a fee when their books are borrowed.  (The Author's Guild has been suggesting this for years....) As Americans, however, we have a very deep sense that libraries must be free.  And by the way, the Nook, if I understand it correctly, permits 14 day "shares" of electronic books.  I'm not sure how that all works out, but that is not supported by tax dollars.  And it is a sort of wine tasting...

 

Okay, I am becoming a bore on this subject.  Sorry.  And I am coming to NC in March to speak to the Baker-Taller conference..Librarians!  Believe me, I share your love of libraries...Some of my happiest hours have been spent there.  But I do know that libraries pay healthy subscriptions for the NY Times and other on-line periodicals and archives.  Why is a book different from a newspaper in that sense?

 

I love talking about these kinds of things...


Rachel-K wrote:

Hi Joe,

 

I wouldn't mistake the author of a love story between academics for an author who doesn't support libraries!

 

And the word "liberty" is obviously much better because it sounds like a fruit. 

 

I'd still argue that if 10% of King and 40% of Issues sales are to us, we're adding and not subtracting. Libraries replace the copies that get worn out, torn up, and accidentally absorbed by personal collections, etc.

 

What percentage of those check outs would have been sales if the copy hadn't been on our shelves? I can't imagine how to figure it.  At least some are by folks who wouldn't or couldn't buy if they didn't have access, and other check-outs are by folks who may wind up giving that particular book as a gift every holiday. (Oh, the Places You'll Go is a great graduation present). I know the closest brick Barnes and Noble is nearly across the street from my branch, and is the surest place to find our patrons if they aren't wandering our stacks.

 

Coffee Luvs makes a good point. Libraries as a wine-tasting for readers wanting to find new authors. Or even better, remember how we used to be warned as kids that drug dealers would let you "try" illegal drugs for free just to get you hopelessly hooked? Maybe this is sort of what libraries do for the book world!

 

Your book tour will rival a Stones tour if you put the word out here! I can't speak for our county, but I'm certain we'd like to invite you in NC, and I think we've got most US states, Brazil and England and a couple of other spots on the globe covered on these boards!

 

 

 


 

Joe-

I cannot disagree with you more strongly.  You would impede and possibly eliminate the opportunity of a portion of our population to read new and existing publications if they were not available for loan by the library.  There are people who currently cannot afford to buy, rent or pay a fee of any kind, in order to read books.  In my local book club there is a member that could not participate if she could not rely on the library or others in the club to loan her the book. 

 

 

Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. ~Barbara Tuchman
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

[ Edited ]

Well, Mr. M, you seem to have opened up a can of worms here....moving right along, you never answered my question...how does one contact you for speaking engagements and do you have a calendar and fee schedule you can share?

thanks,

twj

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


nadine1 wrote:
My former principal (I'm a teacher) would not allow the teachers to show movies in class because the students were supposed to read the rich words and text of the great pieces of literature.  However, nowadays, students learn in different ways (i.e. audio, visual, etc.) and/or have special needs.  A teacher who differentiates instruction by showing a movie or playing music in addition to the text may enhance the lesson and reach the students' multiple intelligences.
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns documentary on the subject be an adequate replacement?  Do we prejudice written text over visual text...and if so, why?  I have a hard time answering the question myself, and sometimes feel sort of stupid when I read a book with a class, then show a movie...(as most teachers do.)  Is the movie supposed to be a lesser rendering of the subject?  Am I supposed to compete with Ken Burns on Jazz if I am teaching music history?  Can the film Dr. Zhivago teach us enough about the Russian Revolution...without our needing to go into a long, detailed history in a text, assuming we are not going to become Russian history specialists?

 

 

Anyway, love talking about this sort of thing....thanks again...


I agree with you in that movies can be used as an additional aid in learning but not as the main vehicle for learning.  Sometimes it is easier to remember or understand something when you can visualize it.  As an example with myself, sometimes just writing a fact down and thinking about it as I am writing will help me to remember it, even if it is the most mundane fact. 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 

As child, growing up in postwar Germany, I spent a lot of my time sitting on the floor of our one-room library. My grandparents once had many, many books, most of which we were forced to burn under Hitler. The library, opened in our very small rural community, was the idea of one woman who shared her personal library with us. Had it not been for her, we children would have gone without the images, words, encouragement, entertainment, creativity that comes from books.
Also, there are many young men like Francis (and women) in inner cities, who, if they are brave enough to follow the slogan "a mind is a terrible thing to waste" and step into a public library, will be able to climb out of their own misery. I have seen it in Los Angeles and in Oakland, from children who would not be caught dead holding a book in public; I've seen them slip cautiously into the library and lose themselves in the aisles filled with book shelves. And, older women and men who share my love of reading, but no longer have the funds to buy books, what would they do without our local library and its free content?
I look at your contribution as author to libraries across the country as contribution to national education. Medicare for the soul. Maybe wine-tasting is not the right metaphor for book-tasting, but I think that this "pro bono work" that authors perform creates stronger minds and I thank all authors for their donations.
By the way, nook's lending feature is a one-time application per book, creating just enough interest to stimulate the marketplace. But many larger libraries now have e-lending features which allow residents to check out books and read them on their computers. My understanding is that the policies are the same as for physical lending of books, the files are withdrawn from the computer at the end of the lending period and the lender is prevented from spreading the file by password protected technology.

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

A ha!  This is an answer to the suggestion that a library serves as a "wine tasting" of authors.  Bad analogy, I say.  After you taste wines, no one gives them out for free.  In fact, I'd love a wine library.  It's great if someone comes across a book in a library and then goes on to buy other works by the same author.  But the argument rests on the premise that libraries must function as they do today....lending out living authors' work for free.  I'll be satisfied and be quiet if you can name one other industry whose output is handed out for free -- without paying the creators -- by the government.  I wish they had plumber libraries or dentist libraries.  I merely suggest that we pay authors -- living authors, not in the public domain -- a fee when their books are borrowed.  (The Author's Guild has been suggesting this for years....) As Americans, however, we have a very deep sense that libraries must be free.  And by the way, the Nook, if I understand it correctly, permits 14 day "shares" of electronic books.  I'm not sure how that all works out, but that is not supported by tax dollars.  And it is a sort of wine tasting...

 

Okay, I am becoming a bore on this subject.  Sorry.  And I am coming to NC in March to speak to the Baker-Tayler conference...librarians!  Believe me, I share your love of libraries....some of my happiest hours have been spent there.  But I do know that libraries pay healthy subscriptions for the NY Times and other on-line periodicals and archives.  Why is a book different from a newspaper in that sense?

 

I love talking about these kinds of things...


Rachel-K wrote:

Hi Joe,

 

I wouldn't mistake the author of a love story between academics for an author who doesn't support libraries!

 

And the word "lieberry" is obviously much better because it sounds like a fruit. 

 

I'd still argue that if 10% of King and 40% of Seuss sales are to us, we're adding and not subtracting. Libraries replace the copies that get worn out, torn up, and accidentally absorbed by personal collections, etc.

 

What percentage of those check outs would have been sales if the copy hadn't been on our shelves? I can't imagine how to figure it.  At least some are by folks who wouldn't or couldn't buy if they didn't have access, and other check-outs are by folks who may wind up giving that particular book as a gift every holiday. (Oh, the Places You'll Go is a great graduation present). I know the closest brick Barnes and Noble is nearly across the street from my branch, and is the surest place to find our patrons if they aren't wandering our stacks.

 

Coffee luvr makes a good point. Libraries as a wine-tasting for readers wanting to find new authors. Or even better, remember how we used to be warned as kids that drug dealers would let you "try" illegal drugs for free just to get you hopelessly hooked? Maybe this is sort of what libraries do for the book world!

 

Your book tour will rival a Stones tour if you put the word out here! I can't speak for our county, but I'm certain we'd like to invite you in NC, and I think we've got most US states, Brazil and England and a couple of other spots on the globe covered on these boards!