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PB684
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎08-03-2007

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


KateBrianIsAwesome wrote:

Hi Mr.Monninger,

 

I finished Eternal on the Water Tuesday! Even though you end it with closure, i'm sure I speak for everyone here, have you thought about writing a squeal? I think it would be interesting to see how Cobb lives the rest of his life, and the other characters too. Also what is your opinion about book series and squeals?


 

I have read many posts like this one, both here and about other books that have captivated readers. I'm sure that this will make some people cringe but it is only my opinion.

 

When we finish a book that we love we immediately want the author to continue the story because maybe we aren't ready to let the characters go. I noticed this occurring quite often when JK Rowling finished the last Harry Potter book. No one, including myself, wanted it to end and there were tons of posts asking her to write sequels. So far she has stated adamently that the series is over and that she wants to move on and I think that was a wise decision. I think, possibly, that interest might wane if a story is too played out and that it's better to end with people wanting more.

 

 While I agree that sometimes it is warrented that the story continues I feel that a sequel following every character might lessen the impact of the initial story. Do we really need to know what happens to every character or can we use our imagination to fill in that information? I think it is a testament to the author that people want to read more...I'm just not convinced that the story would have the same impact...does that make sense?

 

I would be interested to hear your opinion, Joe!

 

Paula

PB684
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PB684
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

Interesting comments.  And of course I am all for readers.  One of the things books may bring that videos and movies fail to bring is civility.  It seems to me that video, because of its speed, coarsened our culture.  I often have students who are quickly bored if something doesn't grab them right away.  Further, because there are so many options for entertainment, the individual becomes an absolute ruler when it comes to his or her personal tastes....to the degree that if it isn't to their taste, it's to no taste at all.  I'm not sure if I'm being clear, but I've read that even people who think they are not influenced by TV are still influenced by TV.  Similarly, even if we think kids are not being influenced unduly by video -- violence in the games, objectification of women and so on -- they probably are.  As a result, we have a more coarsened social fabric.  

But I doubtless sound like an old fogie.....


bookloverjb85 wrote:

 

Joseph,
I am a second grade teacher and we have the students reading ALL the time, we even do 15 minutes of reading everyday.  One of my coworkers read a Harry Potter book to her students one year and then showed the movie.  Her students' comments were "I liked the book better!"  I think if all children could have this revelation so early in life then we would have MANY more readers on our hands.  The problem becomes, and I see this everyday in my students, that parents are not putting books into their homes.  Instead, they are putting video games and multiple TVs in each room.
I am young, 24, and I have always loved reading, ever since I could read.  I remember my parents not allowing us to just sit in front of the TV, but go outside, use our imaginations, be active, etc.  That imagination that I gained then led me to be more involved in books and reading because I could envision what the author was showing.  Children nowadays don't have great imaginations because they are stuck in front of TVs or not made to use them.  This is an unfortunate loss in our society, and no one knows the true impact it will have in coming years.  Will we not have as many great authors, such as yourself?
Sorry to go on a long "rant" but I am also very involved/concerned about this subject.  I have always been interested in education as well (recieving it and giving it) and feel that this is a topic/discussion that could go on and on.

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say. 

 

 


 

  

 


 

I agree wholeheartedly! I see the influence that TV and video games have on children everyday. I work in a school filled with 5-year-olds that believe they are super heroes and ninja fighters. It is the cause of many skirmishes between little boys.

 

I also agree with someone else's post about likeing the version that exists in your own head more than the director's version in a movie. I find this is true more often than not (and I too envisioned the window in Eternal On The Water to be different than the one in the Rock Hudson/Jane Wyman movie!).

Paula

PB684
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KateBrianIsAwesome
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

[ Edited ]

PB684 (Paula),

I agree with what you have to say. Most books should be left alone and not have any sequels. After posting my comment and question, I realized maybe it would be really hard to write a squeal. Plus most people have strong feelings for a first book and the second or more books may not live up to expectations, like you said. I just really wanted to know if Joseph Monninger has ever thought about writing a sequel. I'm not just talking about Eternal on the Water either, but for future books. I also believe that whatever the author wants to do to a novel, whether we like it or not, it is their choice to do what is right for that book. I hope I make sense. The same principle goes for books being made into movies or tv shows. Not everyone is going to like it.


PB684 wrote:

KateBrianIsAwesome wrote:

Hi Mr.Monninger,

 

I finished Eternal on the Water Tuesday! Even though you end it with closure, i'm sure I speak for everyone here, have you thought about writing a squeal? I think it would be interesting to see how Cobb lives the rest of his life, and the other characters too. Also what is your opinion about book series and squeals?


 

I have read many posts like this one, both here and about other books that have captivated readers. I'm sure that this will make some people cringe but it is only my opinion.

 

When we finish a book that we love we immediately want the author to continue the story because maybe we aren't ready to let the characters go. I noticed this occurring quite often when JK Rowling finished the last Harry Potter book. No one, including myself, wanted it to end and there were tons of posts asking her to write sequels. So far she has stated adamently that the series is over and that she wants to move on and I think that was a wise decision. I think, possibly, that interest might wane if a story is too played out and that it's better to end with people wanting more.

 

 While I agree that sometimes it is warrented that the story continues I feel that a sequel following every character might lessen the impact of the initial story. Do we really need to know what happens to every character or can we use our imagination to fill in that information? I think it is a testament to the author that people want to read more...I'm just not convinced that the story would have the same impact...does that make sense?

 

I would be interested to hear your opinion, Joe!

 

Paula


 

Reading can only make you more happy and smarter. :smileyhappy:

Visit my blog at http://teenbibliophile.blogspot.com/

- Mallory
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PB684
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


KateBrianIsAwesome wrote:

PB684 (Paula),

I agree with what you have to say. Most books should be left alone and not have any sequels. After posting my comment and question, I realized maybe it would be really hard to write a squeal. Plus most people have strong feelings for a first book and the second or more books may not live up to expectations, like you said. I just really wanted to know if Joseph Monninger has ever thought about writing a sequel. I'm not just talking about Eternal on the Water either, but for future books. I also believe that whatever the author wants to do to a novel, whether we like it or not, it is their choice to do what is right for that book. I hope I make sense. The same principle goes for books being made into movies or tv shows. Not everyone is going to like it.


I hope I didn't offend you with my post. It wasn't meant as a criticism, merely an observation. I think that you are in the majority on these boards as I have read many posts asking about the fate of the remaining characters. I just couldn't help putting my "two cents" in.

Paula:smileyhappy:

 

PB684
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KateBrianIsAwesome
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

It's ok, I figured that my post sparked something in your mind. Most of us after seeing something repeatedly have the urge to speak out and give our opinions on the matter.


PB684 wrote:

KateBrianIsAwesome wrote:

PB684 (Paula),

I agree with what you have to say. Most books should be left alone and not have any sequels. After posting my comment and question, I realized maybe it would be really hard to write a squeal. Plus most people have strong feelings for a first book and the second or more books may not live up to expectations, like you said. I just really wanted to know if Joseph Monninger has ever thought about writing a sequel. I'm not just talking about Eternal on the Water either, but for future books. I also believe that whatever the author wants to do to a novel, whether we like it or not, it is their choice to do what is right for that book. I hope I make sense. The same principle goes for books being made into movies or tv shows. Not everyone is going to like it.


I hope I didn't offend you with my post. It wasn't meant as a criticism, merely an observation. I think that you are in the majority on these boards as I have read many posts asking about the fate of the remaining characters. I just couldn't help putting my "two cents" in.

Paula:smileyhappy:

 


 

Reading can only make you more happy and smarter. :smileyhappy:

Visit my blog at http://teenbibliophile.blogspot.com/

- Mallory
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Clevegal42
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi Joe -

 

Thank you for allowing us the privilege of reading your book in the First Look club.  I just finished the book and even though I knew it was coming from the beginning, I was still greatly saddened by Mary's death.

 

I think this might have been mentioned in another thread, but I'm curious about the time spent outdoors.  Most of the story takes place in the outdoors - what was your motivation to write it like that?  The characters definitely feel like they are more at ease in the outdoors, but I was wondering why that is?

 

It might be a metaphor, but I was never a brilliant English student so it might have escaped me - if that's the case, you can just call me a dodo as you explain it like I'm a five year old.  =)

 

I'm more of a lurker than a poster, but I've enjoyed the discussions in this thread and all the others.  Thank you for taking the time to join us and share in the discussion.

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Jo6353
Posts: 683
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

I am not a librarian, on a board or connected in any way politically to a library; however I have been a frequent user of libraries in every town I have lived.  I agree with Rachel-K; I am surprised that there is any feeling but positive towards these wonderful institutions.  I have been introduced to many authors that I would not have read if I had to "buy" every one before I could read it.  I would only stick to the tried and true authors.  After reading a book by not an overly popular author, Patrick McManus, I then bought several of his books and am always on the look out for another.  His works are not always in the book stores either.  He is a humorist and I fell in love with his style.  Since discovering his works in the library, I introduced his writing to my husband and my son (neither one much of a reader) and to my brother who is the most well read person I know. 

I never would have purchased works by this author had I not stumbled across one of his really early books in the library!

 

I too have discovered many authors at the library and have subsequently purchased their other books.And believe me, my house is a true testament of my book purchases!  I could probably stock a decent sized library!

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Jo6353
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

The Hardy Boys, for instance!  My best early reading experience was with the Hardy Boys!  I loved those books and even the taste of the pages...I still read one once a year just for fun.

 

That's very interesting!  My love of reading was shaped early on by reading Nancy Drew books!  I too, pick up one a year and re-read it.  Jo

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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 


aprilh wrote:

Sandy, I also pictured a round window while reading EOTW. I'm not sure if it was due to the way I read the description of the window or if my imagination just took over and invented the picture itself. I'll have to go back later and re-read that part. I saw the trailer for "All That Heaven Allows" (thanks to a posting someone wrote on one of the threads that it could be found on YouTube) and saw the window that we all read about. It looked very nice in the movie, but I've decided I like the way my imagination painted the window better! :smileyhappy:

 


ssizemore wrote:

 Just finished watching "All That Heaven Allows"--loved it.  It did, however, confirm what I used to teach my high school literature students and that is that your imagination can paint a very different picture of the written word.  First of all, I don't know why, but I pictured a round window--???  Both Jane Woman and Rock Hudson were too old to be Mary and Cob, but then this wasn't a movie of TOTE.  One of the tricks I used with my students was to have them read a book and then we would watch the movie in class.  Ninety percent of the students liked the book better when asked for a critique.  They always said that the characters or the setting or the action was all wrong.  When we read, we have a picture in our mind of what the people look like and a sense of place.  Isn't that what the director of a movie does too?  We shouldn't be surprised when our sense of it doesn't match his.

I did love seeing the movie--and the scenes containing the window added to my sense of place for Mary and Cobbs home.  Wouldn't you love to visit it?

Sandy


 

Hi Joe,

 

I wrote in some post (I don't even remember where) that "All That Heavens Allows" is one of my all time favorite movies.  I watch it every time it's on TV, sometimes even in the wee hours.  From the very first time I saw it, the two things that stuck in my mind was (1) the window and (2) the relationship between Jane Woman and Rock Hudson.  Of all movies to be mentioned in a book, I couldn't believe you picked this one.  Good choice!

 

I could visualize Cob being somewhat like Rock, but thinner and more rugged looking but I couldn't visualize Mary resembling anything like Jane Woman.  I picture Mary as thin, long straight hair and athletic like, whereas Jane is very country-club type, always dressed perfectly.  The only similarity is their relationship and you hit it dead on there.

Because I had seen the movie decades prior to reading the book, I remembered the window as being retangular and remember talking out loud to the book when I got to the part when Mr. Cobb spoke of a round window.  He probably never saw the movie!

 

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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 


PB684 wrote:

KateBrianIsAwesome wrote:

Hi Mr.Monninger,

 

I finished Eternal on the Water Tuesday! Even though you end it with closure, i'm sure I speak for everyone here, have you thought about writing a squeal? I think it would be interesting to see how Cobb lives the rest of his life, and the other characters too. Also what is your opinion about book series and squeals?


 

I have read many posts like this one, both here and about other books that have captivated readers. I'm sure that this will make some people cringe but it is only my opinion.

 

When we finish a book that we love we immediately want the author to continue the story because maybe we aren't ready to let the characters go. I noticed this occurring quite often when JK Rowling finished the last Harry Potter book. No one, including myself, wanted it to end and there were tons of posts asking her to write sequels. So far she has stated adamently that the series is over and that she wants to move on and I think that was a wise decision. I think, possibly, that interest might wane if a story is too played out and that it's better to end with people wanting more.

 

 While I agree that sometimes it is warrented that the story continues I feel that a sequel following every character might lessen the impact of the initial story. Do we really need to know what happens to every character or can we use our imagination to fill in that information? I think it is a testament to the author that people want to read more...I'm just not convinced that the story would have the same impact...does that make sense?

 

I would be interested to hear your opinion, Joe!

 

Paula


 

 

Hi Paula,

As much as I would love to read the sequel, Mary and Cobb "together" was the story.  Maybe there should have been a short epilogue about Cobb spanning the next couple of years in his life to give us all closure.  We know that Freddy didn't have HD and the others were all minor characters.

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fordmg
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


PB684 wrote:

KateBrianIsAwesome wrote:

Hi Mr.Monninger,

 

I finished Eternal on the Water Tuesday! Even though you end it with closure, i'm sure I speak for everyone here, have you thought about writing a squeal? I think it would be interesting to see how Cobb lives the rest of his life, and the other characters too. Also what is your opinion about book series and squeals?


 

I have read many posts like this one, both here and about other books that have captivated readers. I'm sure that this will make some people cringe but it is only my opinion.

 

When we finish a book that we love we immediately want the author to continue the story because maybe we aren't ready to let the characters go. I noticed this occurring quite often when JK Rowling finished the last Harry Potter book. No one, including myself, wanted it to end and there were tons of posts asking her to write sequels. So far she has stated adamently that the series is over and that she wants to move on and I think that was a wise decision. I think, possibly, that interest might wane if a story is too played out and that it's better to end with people wanting more.

 

 While I agree that sometimes it is warrented that the story continues I feel that a sequel following every character might lessen the impact of the initial story. Do we really need to know what happens to every character or can we use our imagination to fill in that information? I think it is a testament to the author that people want to read more...I'm just not convinced that the story would have the same impact...does that make sense?

 

I would be interested to hear your opinion, Joe!

 

Paula


 

Paula, I agree with you.  This book stands alone.  A sequel would not work for me.  The book challenges and makes the reader think.  That is the mark of a good book that after I finish reading it, I think through characters and the issues of the story.  A continuation on this book would be weak.

MG

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LindaEducation
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Joe, Thanks for spending time with us this past month,and for letting us enjoy Eternal On The Water.  I am now currently reading another book of yours Home Waters.  I must say I LOVE it.  My husband and I are dog lovers and also love to fish.  I am reading this book a little at a time because I am enjoying it so much, and dont want it to end.

 

Linda

You know you've read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend. -- Paul Sweeney
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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 Hi, Folks....Jumping in here for a last day.  I've read many of the posts and appreciate all you have had to say.  I tell all of my writer friends how wonderful this experience has been and they are jealous!  It really is rare to have such direct contact with readers.  

 

So...if there are anymore questions or comments I'd be happy to field them.  I am curious what you thought of the moral question at the end.  As I wrote the novel, I imagined people would find Mary's ending more problematic than seems to be the case.  I'm happy to see most people accepted it as her decision.

 

I was bewildered by one remark that bounced around here...the notion that there were too many brand names!  That came entirely out of left field for me, and try as I might I couldn't recall a single instance of using a brand name.  Strange.  I suppose I must have done, but the irony is I live in a town without any kind of shopping and I don't own a television....so I am not one to spend much time worrying about brand names!  Anyway, I'll take a look at that notion.

 

A belated Happy Ground Hog Day....half way through winter.  Lately we've observed more light at the end of the day and the birds seem to be slowly coming back.  I've always said once we have the red-winged blackbirds back spring is close to hand.

 

I'll check in today.  I'm back to teaching, so I will pop in and out....thanks...J 

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dhaupt
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi Joe, thanks for the praise. This is a wonderful group and it's always a pleasure to discuss a novel with them and with the author du jour.

For the moral question you raised, speaking for myself alone, I believe that a person has the right to make the ultimate of final decisions in their life. We have no control except preventative precautions as to what illnesses we may face in the course of our short visit here on earth and if in sound mind one of those afflictions takes away our humanity we have a right to make the decision of when enough is enough. Not only for us but for our loved ones who have to watch us deteriorate. But the ultimate decision is ours.

Thank you for your wonderful book.

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Tarri
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Jo6353 wrote:

The Hardy Boys, for instance!  My best early reading experience was with the Hardy Boys!  I loved those books and even the taste of the pages...I still read one once a year just for fun.

 

That's very interesting!  My love of reading was shaped early on by reading Nancy Drew books!  I too, pick up one a year and re-read it.  Jo


I still have my Nancy Drew books :smileyhappy: and I just started reading The Hardy Boys to my great-nephew.
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Sadie1
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

 Hi, Folks....Jumping in here for a last day.  I've read many of the posts and appreciate all you have had to say.  I tell all of my writer friends how wonderful this experience has been and they are jealous!  It really is rare to have such direct contact with readers.  

 

So...if there are anymore questions or comments I'd be happy to field them.  I am curious what you thought of the moral question at the end.  As I wrote the novel, I imagined people would find Mary's ending more problematic than seems to be the case.  I'm happy to see most people accepted it as her decision.

 

I was bewildered by one remark that bounced around here...the notion that there were too many brand names!  That came entirely out of left field for me, and try as I might I couldn't recall a single instance of using a brand name.  Strange.  I suppose I must have done, but the irony is I live in a town without any kind of shopping and I don't own a television....so I am not one to spend much time worrying about brand names!  Anyway, I'll take a look at that notion.

 

A belated Happy Ground Hog Day....half way through winter.  Lately we've observed more light at the end of the day and the birds seem to be slowly coming back.  I've always said once we have the red-winged blackbirds back spring is close to hand.

 

I'll check in today.  I'm back to teaching, so I will pop in and out....thanks...J 


 

 

Joe, Some of us wrote what we thought about the moral question on the Final Chapters thread.  Yes it was Mary's decision.

 

Your book was just beautiful from beginning to end!  Thank you!

 

I didn't notice any band names.  I wouldn't let it bewilder me anymore if I were you. 

 

You can have most of your noisey red-winged blackbirds back.  We are tired of them.  They are driving my dogs nuts.  The tree's and yards are covered with them all through winter here.  Even when we are in single digits.  Georgia just isn't far enough south for them.  I've been feeding them, so, they are hardy for you.  They are also covering our cars with other things.  Some will stay, we have them all throughout the year down here, but throughout the winter, it's massive.  Black clouds of birds everywhere.  Gives one that creepy feeling from the movie, "The Birds".

 

Isn't it great living without a tv.  There are so many other wonderful things in life to do without a tv, like getting out and enjoying nature and reading books.

 

Lisa in Georgia

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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Sadie1 wrote:

 


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

 Hi, Folks....Jumping in here for a last day.  I've read many of the posts and appreciate all you have had to say.  I tell all of my writer friends how wonderful this experience has been and they are jealous!  It really is rare to have such direct contact with readers.  

 

So...if there are anymore questions or comments I'd be happy to field them.  I am curious what you thought of the moral question at the end.  As I wrote the novel, I imagined people would find Mary's ending more problematic than seems to be the case.  I'm happy to see most people accepted it as her decision.

 

I was bewildered by one remark that bounced around here...the notion that there were too many brand names!  That came entirely out of left field for me, and try as I might I couldn't recall a single instance of using a brand name.  Strange.  I suppose I must have done, but the irony is I live in a town without any kind of shopping and I don't own a television....so I am not one to spend much time worrying about brand names!  Anyway, I'll take a look at that notion.

 

A belated Happy Ground Hog Day....half way through winter.  Lately we've observed more light at the end of the day and the birds seem to be slowly coming back.  I've always said once we have the red-winged blackbirds back spring is close to hand.

 

I'll check in today.  I'm back to teaching, so I will pop in and out....thanks...J 


 

 

Joe, Some of us wrote what we thought about the moral question on the Final Chapters thread.  Yes it was Mary's decision.

 

Your book was just beautiful from beginning to end!  Thank you!

 

I didn't notice any band names.  I wouldn't let it bewilder me anymore if I were you. 

 

You can have most of your noisey red-winged blackbirds back.  We are tired of them.  They are driving my dogs nuts.  The tree's and yards are covered with them all through winter here.  Even when we are in single digits.  Georgia just isn't far enough south for them.  I've been feeding them, so, they are hardy for you.  They are also covering our cars with other things.  Some will stay, we have them all throughout the year down here, but throughout the winter, it's massive.  Black clouds of birds everywhere.  Gives one that creepy feeling from the movie, "The Birds".

 

Isn't it great living without a tv.  There are so many other wonderful things in life to do without a tv, like getting out and enjoying nature and reading books.

 

Lisa in Georgia


The two brand names that come to mind immedlately are Toyota and LL Bean.  Brand names are a part of every day life.

 

 

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Sherry_Young
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Joe,

 

I'm not sure if you still get back on here and read, but I am still posting.

 

I just wanted to share with you how much a friend and I enjoyed Eternal on the Water. Your book was selected for our book club to read and discuss this May. I can't wait to share their thoughts on Mary, Cobb & the Chungamunga girls!

 

Thank you for writing such a beautiful story!

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.
— Judy Blume