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Wordsmith
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

I'm interested in your comments because again books are privileged over movies.  I teach with a woman who would argue that everything is a text....even shopping circulars.  She would say, I think, that we don't know for sure if we are reading the same book.  When you read Eternal on the Water, you bring to bear all your past experience and knowledge.  So do I when I read books.  But does the text remain the same?  My goodness, when you consider some of the reviews a book gets -- even right here in First Look Country -- you can see people read through a lens they make themselves.  

 

If we grant that books mean different things to different people, then why stop there?  If we supply the details with our imagination, why not simply read an outline of a book....and fill it in with our own interpretations?  I had a friend who read book jackets for two months and engaged people in conversation.  In time he couldn't remember if he had actually read the book or simply read the jacket.  He invented the entire book, you see.  And during the conversation, he believed the two people discussing the book came up with a third meaning of the book....a shared vision of it.

 

I dare say a good documentary could teach us as much about the history of baseball (again Ken Burns) as a book on the same subject.  And as to imagination....Avatar certainly stirred my imagination with its visual rendering of the world.  So did Lord of the Rings years ago.  My son read the Hobbit and loved it, but he found the other Ring books slow going.  So he watched the movies.  Did he really miss something?  Or did he have the same experience...or close enough....as someone who read them all?  Could you watch the Harry Potter movies and have roughly the same experience as those who have read them?  I would argue maybe....

 

Anyway, provocative questions and ideas.  I like talking about this stuff.  I wrote a column for years about common, everyday topics mostly revolving around education.  I am against homework, for instance, and that always got people going.  

 

Thanks again for airing your views.  I'd love to hear more....


Sadie1 wrote:

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns doc


I think watching a movie isn't the same as reading a book.  No where near the same.  I have a 17 year old.  I taught him to read books from a very young age.  He spends his hard earned lawn mowing money now on books.  He does have a healthy supply of video games too.  But, he reads and he loves to read.
Books allow us to build up our imaginations.  Movies don't.  Movies have the scenery all there for us.  But a book allows us to imagine that scenery in our own minds.  We need to use our brains or we are going to lose them, so when I read a book, I am using those brain cells.  Watching a movie, my brain is numbed out some.
Also, due to time restraints, movies cut a lot out that can be included in a book.
I don't care to read ebooks.  I enjoy having that book in my hands.  I can just see me know laying in bed with a computer in my hands reading..when I fall asleep and that computer drops to the floor, it's going to break.  The book will be okay in the morning and it also won't wake me up when it crashes to the floor.  LOL!
Lisa in Georgia

 

 

 

Obviously, this will have a big impact on education.  Believe me, I'm not saying we shouldn't read.  I am simply wondering out loud if visual stimulation through movies and so on isn't the equivalent.  Could a person be "well educated" (whatever that means exactly) by simply watching movies?  


I agree here.  How can a person be "well educated" just by watching movies.  Movies leave out so much.  When reading a book, your imagination can wander.  Sometimes what has been bothering you or something that you haven't had closure on previously can let you see it in a completely different light and understand it.   

 

Someone mention Ken Burns, above posting.  I remember watching his series on NYC and was so impressed by it that I ordered the whole series.  I've always been interested in the history of NYC and already knew most of what he presented.  I will play one of the disks from this series, not because I want to learn but because I enjoying listening/watching to it.  Of course, I like to impress myself about how much of the facts I already know! 

 

 

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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi, Well, I usually speak for free...and do so all the time over here in NH.  Vermont, piece of cake.  But I am on or in the Simon and Schuster speaker bureau.  I also work through the New Hampshire Writer's Project from time to time....so, it's pretty easy to get in touch with me.  Thanks...J


thewanderingjew wrote:

Well, Mr. M, you seem to have opened up a can of worms here....moving right along, you never answered my question...how does one contact you for speaking engagements and do you have a calendar and fee schedule you can share?

thanks,

twj


 

 

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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

I actually believe in the old adage that education is about lighting a fire, not filling a pail.  My goal in teaching is to try to excite and involve students....All education is incomplete, I think.  Heck, I can't fix my own cars and I've been driving around for years in one kind or another.  If we get into making sure kids have a check mark next to everything, it could go on forever.  

 

So movies over books....or books over movies?  Well, what about plays?  In other words, isn't there always another branch of education to explore?  Do we value books more because that's the way we were taught?  Much of the world is running on computer "code" and I am illiterate in that language.  Whenever someone says this one thing to know is better than the next....I start to get nervous.

 

Anyway, I am drifting far afield here, but I hope it's fun for everyone.  I do care about these issues and wrestle with them daily in my teaching.  I love to get a room full of young people together and ask them these questions...they have amazing reactions, believe me.  For instance, they once asked why they had to bother studying geography in the time of Google Maps.  Obviously, geography is still important, but I got their message.  I don't consult an


literature wrote:

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

I'm interested in your comments because again books are privileged over movies.  I teach with a woman who would argue that everything is a text....even shopping circulars.  She would say, I think, that we don't know for sure if we are reading the same book.  When you read Eternal on the Water, you bring to bear all your past experience and knowledge.  So do I when I read books.  But does the text remain the same?  My goodness, when you consider some of the reviews a book gets -- even right here in First Look Country -- you can see people read through a lens they make themselves.  

 

If we grant that books mean different things to different people, then why stop there?  If we supply the details with our imagination, why not simply read an outline of a book....and fill it in with our own interpretations?  I had a friend who read book jackets for two months and engaged people in conversation.  In time he couldn't remember if he had actually read the book or simply read the jacket.  He invented the entire book, you see.  And during the conversation, he believed the two people discussing the book came up with a third meaning of the book....a shared vision of it.

 

I dare say a good documentary could teach us as much about the history of baseball (again Ken Burns) as a book on the same subject.  And as to imagination....Avatar certainly stirred my imagination with its visual rendering of the world.  So did Lord of the Rings years ago.  My son read the Hobbit and loved it, but he found the other Ring books slow going.  So he watched the movies.  Did he really miss something?  Or did he have the same experience...or close enough....as someone who read them all?  Could you watch the Harry Potter movies and have roughly the same experience as those who have read them?  I would argue maybe....

 

Anyway, provocative questions and ideas.  I like talking about this stuff.  I wrote a column for years about common, everyday topics mostly revolving around education.  I am against homework, for instance, and that always got people going.  

 

Thanks again for airing your views.  I'd love to hear more....


Sadie1 wrote:

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns doc


I think watching a movie isn't the same as reading a book.  No where near the same.  I have a 17 year old.  I taught him to read books from a very young age.  He spends his hard earned lawn mowing money now on books.  He does have a healthy supply of video games too.  But, he reads and he loves to read.
Books allow us to build up our imaginations.  Movies don't.  Movies have the scenery all there for us.  But a book allows us to imagine that scenery in our own minds.  We need to use our brains or we are going to lose them, so when I read a book, I am using those brain cells.  Watching a movie, my brain is numbed out some.
Also, due to time restraints, movies cut a lot out that can be included in a book.
I don't care to read ebooks.  I enjoy having that book in my hands.  I can just see me know laying in bed with a computer in my hands reading..when I fall asleep and that computer drops to the floor, it's going to break.  The book will be okay in the morning and it also won't wake me up when it crashes to the floor.  LOL!
Lisa in Georgia

 

 

 

Obviously, this will have a big impact on education.  Believe me, I'm not saying we shouldn't read.  I am simply wondering out loud if visual stimulation through movies and so on isn't the equivalent.  Could a person be "well educated" (whatever that means exactly) by simply watching movies?  


I agree here.  How can a person be "well educated" just by watching movies.  Movies leave out so much.  When reading a book, your imagination can wander.  Sometimes what has been bothering you or something that you haven't had closure on previously can let you see it in a completely different light and understand it.   

 

Someone mention Ken Burns, above posting.  I remember watching his series on NYC and was so impressed by it that I ordered the whole series.  I've always been interested in the history of NYC and already knew most of what he presented.  I will play one of the disks from this series, not because I want to learn but because I enjoying listening/watching to it.  Of course, I like to impress myself about how much of the facts I already know! 

 

 


 

Atlas anymore...I zoom around on Google.  Most of the research everyone does is on line.  It's the format that is changing, that's all.   

 

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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Mongering

Well, we're actually talking about two different things.  I'm all for libraries, as I've said over and over here.  Libraries have many wonderful functions in the community.  What I'm talking about is a difficult concept, because people see it as an attack on an important institution.  It's not meant to be; that's not my intention at all.  It's saying if we truly value the materials that go into libraries, then let's endorse or underwrite those people who produce the work.  No one is disputing putting Dickens on a shelf.  But libraries pay for periodicals.  They pay for clipping services, and hundreds of different things...heck, the lines that run the cable hookups are not free.  Time Warner or whoever is paid to provide internet service.  So is the computer company.  All of the software on the computer is site licensed....should we be able to give that software away for free?  Try it sometime and you'll find people ready to sue.  We have students at my university in trouble ALL the time for downloading copyright-able material.  

 

Please understand I am playing Devil's advocate here.  I'm one of those annoying teacher types who likes to stir things up.  Libraries were started in a different world...things have changed.  I'm simply pointing out some arguments that have been circulating for years in other countries....

 

The last thing I am trying to do is step on toes....Thanks. J

 

But I am jumping off here and getting back to the novel!  Sorry if I have nudged this discussion astray...

Melissa_W
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

It's supported by consumer dollars.  The nook lending works only once; a nook owner can loan a purchased ebook once for 14 days to a friend with either a nook or the BN eReader software.  The owner of the ebook cannot read that book for the 14 days it has been loaned out.  That ebook can't be loaned again.  It's far less permissive than loaning out a paper copy.
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

And by the way, the Nook, if I understand it correctly, permits 14 day "shares" of electronic books.  I'm not sure how that all works out, but that is not supported by tax dollars.  


Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Vt Cozy wrote..Joseph,just having you here and having just finished "Internal on the Water" the other day is really such a treat for us..I want you to know that .I am a very sincere person,and of course a Vermonter,for 7 yrs.Your book has touched me,become a part of my conversation these days..I just wanted you to know that..I hope to see you here in Manchester Center,Vt..at a bookstore which will remain nameless,or BarnesandNoble ..Yes ,the end of the book..I guess we must deal with that part,I just put my own spin on "Where are Cobb ,Francis"...'Eternal".Continues........Vtcozy  Susan.... 
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

Just trying to keep things interesting...and perhaps to make us think about books in a different way.  That's all.  I'm waiting to talk about the end of the novel...which I hope brings up a host of conversations....


Vermontcozy wrote:

Dear Joseph..Living in a small Vt. town with an exceptional library ,Mark Skinner Library..Manchester,Vt..I must say that we have never as taxpayers turned down a request for funding.We also give out of our own pockets,magazine subscriptions,new books,etc.We have enormous Library  Book Sales to help with the funding.I cherished reading "Eternal on the Water",emailed Mark Skinner to buy a few copies,I know all the Library Staff.This is certainly not the forum to speak about how much authors receive,or don't receive.because ,yes Library's do give out books for free..I really don't care about  what authors receive or don't receive..I will share my copy of "Eternal on the Water",and will,buy a few for gifts,but in this economy,how can you expect us to wrap our brains around your and your publishers profit margin..Vtc  Susan ..I also frequent The Dorset Library..which is a much smaller version of Mark Skinner...


 

 


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Joseph Mongering

Dear Joseph..We are a passionate group.Its easy to get sidetracked.Back to "Eternal" Could you as the Author foresee a sequel.So many unanswered questions,which I think is good.I felt the book is complete,but also see growth in the characters as they go on without Mary.Has that entered in your equation ? Vtc Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi Joe,

 

I wrote in some post (I don't even remember where) that "All That Heavens Allows" is one of my all time favorite movies.  I watch it every time it's on TV, sometimes even in the wee hours.  From the very first time I saw it, the two things that stuck in my mind was (1) the window and (2) the relationship between Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson.  Of all movies to be mentioned in a book, I couldn't believe you picked this one.  Good choice!

 

I could visualize Cobb being somewhat like Rock, but thinner and more rugged looking but I couldn't visualize Mary resembling anything like Jane Wyman.  I picture Mary as thin, long straight hair and athletic like, whereas Jane is very country-club type, always dressed perfectly.  The only similarity is their relationship and you hit it dead on there.

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Sadie1
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 

Joe,
How about this scenario:  Your sister is brutally murdered March 7, 1981.  An author writes a book about it and self-publishes in 1987.  You accidentally come across this book in 2006.  You see how your sister was smeared...not even a true story, true story was written.
The daughter of the murderer contacts you from a posting you posted about the book when you found the book.  The daughter of the murderer has successfully gotten herself on many tv shows..including America's Most Wanted and still to this day is trying for more tv shows to promote herself.
She finally got herself on a cheesy tv show last year called Wicked Attraction...it's a Discovery Channel show and they did a Cheesey cheesy documentary based on the book that came out in 1987 that was based on an untrue story.
There are several sites online about True Crimes, most of these sites have my sisters murder and murderers on them.  All the information on those sites are based on an untrue book.
The author of the book is in hiding.  He was even contacted by the producers of Wicked Attraction to contact my family...he will not contact us.
My mother, the mother of my brutally murdered sister, has not made a penny off of any of this..not that she would want to.  But we as a family have not authorized anyone to make anything off of our brutally murdered loved one.  It also really disturbs us that she was not portrayed as who she really was and what truly happened.
So, suffice it to say, there are authors out there making a living off of people that really exist and existed.  There are tv shows doing the same.
Now, if you ever run across a Richard D. Reynolds in the land of authors, please tell him if he has any decency about him, that he will contact the family and make amends.  He owes my family a huge apology and the world a retraction.
Lisa in Georgia

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

A ha!  This is an answer to the suggestion that a library serves as a "wine tasting" of authors.  Bad analogy, I say.  After you taste wines, no one gives them out for free.  In fact, I'd love a wine library.  It's great if someone comes across a book in a library and then goes on to buy other works by the same author.  But the argument rests on the premise that libraries must function as they do today....lending out living authors' work for free.  I'll be satisfied and be quiet if you can name one other industry whose output is handed out for free -- without paying the creators -- by the government.  I wish they had plumber libraries or dentist libraries.  I merely suggest that we pay authors -- living authors, not in the public domain -- a fee when their books are borrowed.  (The Author's Guild has been suggesting this for years....) As Americans, however, we have a very deep sense that libraries must be free.  And by the way, the Nook, if I understand it correctly, permits 14 day "shares" of electronic books.  I'm not sure how that all works out, but that is not supported by tax dollars.  And it is a sort of wine tasting...

 

Okay, I am becoming a bore on this subject.  Sorry.  And I am coming to NC in March to speak to the Baker-Tayler conference...librarians!  Believe me, I share your love of libraries....some of my happiest hours have been spent there.  But I do know that libraries pay healthy subscriptions for the NY Times and other on-line periodicals and archives.  Why is a book different from a newspaper in that sense?

 

I love talking about these kinds of things...


 

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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

What a wonderful coincidence!  I love the movie, obviously.  As I said in an earlier post, it is really wonderfully poised on the cusp of the 1960's....all that status concern and country club life is just about to be rocked.  (No pun intended.)  

 

I'm glad you mentioned the movie and I hope it gets a tiny bump up from its inclusion in the novel.  It deserves it.

 

Thanks...J


literature wrote:

Hi Joe,

 

I wrote in some post (I don't even remember where) that "All That Heavens Allows" is one of my all time favorite movies.  I watch it every time it's on TV, sometimes even in the wee hours.  From the very first time I saw it, the two things that stuck in my mind was (1) the window and (2) the relationship between Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson.  Of all movies to be mentioned in a book, I couldn't believe you picked this one.  Good choice!

 

I could visualize Cobb being somewhat like Rock, but thinner and more rugged looking but I couldn't visualize Mary resembling anything like Jane Wyman.  I picture Mary as thin, long straight hair and athletic like, whereas Jane is very country-club type, always dressed perfectly.  The only similarity is their relationship and you hit it dead on there.


 

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Thanks Mr. Monninger, we will be in touch very soon. Hopefully you will be Eternal on the River for us!

twj

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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Dear Joeseph,Thank you for spending time with us.I will be following your Book Tour on simonandschuster.com. I will never forget "Eternal on the Water". Mary,Cobb,The Chungamunga Girls are not to be taken lightly.A beautiful glimpse into your world of writing.I look forward to your next book.Hopefully,you will be in Manchester Center,Vt.and we can treat you to a your choice of coffee and one of their homemade with lots of Vt love ,pastries.If not in Vt,then maybe ..Latham Barnes and Noble.Good luck with your release date..Best..Susan,Vtcozy...Do you have or plan to have a blog?

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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bookloverjb85
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 

Joseph,
I am a second grade teacher and we have the students reading ALL the time, we even do 15 minutes of reading everyday.  One of my coworkers read a Harry Potter book to her students one year and then showed the movie.  Her students' comments were "I liked the book better!"  I think if all children could have this revelation so early in life then we would have MANY more readers on our hands.  The problem becomes, and I see this everyday in my students, that parents are not putting books into their homes.  Instead, they are putting video games and multiple TVs in each room.
I am young, 24, and I have always loved reading, ever since I could read.  I remember my parents not allowing us to just sit in front of the TV, but go outside, use our imaginations, be active, etc.  That imagination that I gained then led me to be more involved in books and reading because I could envision what the author was showing.  Children nowadays don't have great imaginations because they are stuck in front of TVs or not made to use them.  This is an unfortunate loss in our society, and no one knows the true impact it will have in coming years.  Will we not have as many great authors, such as yourself?
Sorry to go on a long "rant" but I am also very involved/concerned about this subject.  I have always been interested in education as well (recieving it and giving it) and feel that this is a topic/discussion that could go on and on.

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say. 

 

 

--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Interesting comments.  And of course I am all for readers.  One of the things books may bring that videos and movies fail to bring is civility.  It seems to me that video, because of its speed, coarsened our culture.  I often have students who are quickly bored if something doesn't grab them right away.  Further, because there are so many options for entertainment, the individual becomes an absolute ruler when it comes to his or her personal tastes....to the degree that if it isn't to their taste, it's to no taste at all.  I'm not sure if I'm being clear, but I've read that even people who think they are not influenced by TV are still influenced by TV.  Similarly, even if we think kids are not being influenced unduly by video -- violence in the games, objectification of women and so on -- they probably are.  As a result, we have a more coarsened social fabric.  

But I doubtless sound like an old fogie.....


bookloverjb85 wrote:

 

Joseph,
I am a second grade teacher and we have the students reading ALL the time, we even do 15 minutes of reading everyday.  One of my coworkers read a Harry Potter book to her students one year and then showed the movie.  Her students' comments were "I liked the book better!"  I think if all children could have this revelation so early in life then we would have MANY more readers on our hands.  The problem becomes, and I see this everyday in my students, that parents are not putting books into their homes.  Instead, they are putting video games and multiple TVs in each room.
I am young, 24, and I have always loved reading, ever since I could read.  I remember my parents not allowing us to just sit in front of the TV, but go outside, use our imaginations, be active, etc.  That imagination that I gained then led me to be more involved in books and reading because I could envision what the author was showing.  Children nowadays don't have great imaginations because they are stuck in front of TVs or not made to use them.  This is an unfortunate loss in our society, and no one knows the true impact it will have in coming years.  Will we not have as many great authors, such as yourself?
Sorry to go on a long "rant" but I am also very involved/concerned about this subject.  I have always been interested in education as well (recieving it and giving it) and feel that this is a topic/discussion that could go on and on.

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say. 

 

 


 

  

 

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KateBrianIsAwesome
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi Mr.Monninger,

 

I finished Eternal on the Water Tuesday! Even though you end it with closure, i'm sure I speak for everyone here, have you thought about writing a squeal? I think it would be interesting to see how Cobb lives the rest of his life, and the other characters too. Also what is your opinion about book series and squeals?

Reading can only make you more happy and smarter. :smileyhappy:

Visit my blog at http://teenbibliophile.blogspot.com/

- Mallory
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ssizemore
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Re: Questions for Joseph Mongering

 Just finished watching "All That Heaven Allows"--loved it.  It did, however, confirm what I used to teach my high school literature students and that is that your imagination can paint a very different picture of the written word.  First of all, I don't know why, but I pictured a round window--???  Both Jane Woman and Rock Hudson were too old to be Mary and Cob, but then this wasn't a movie of TOTE.  One of the tricks I used with my students was to have them read a book and then we would watch the movie in class.  Ninety percent of the students liked the book better when asked for a critique.  They always said that the characters or the setting or the action was all wrong.  When we read, we have a picture in our mind of what the people look like and a sense of place.  Isn't that what the director of a movie does too?  We shouldn't be surprised when our sense of it doesn't match his.

I did love seeing the movie--and the scenes containing the window added to my sense of place for Mary and Cobbs home.  Wouldn't you love to visit it?

Sandy


 

Hi Joe,

 

I wrote in some post (I don't even remember where) that "All That Heavens Allows" is one of my all time favorite movies.  I watch it every time it's on TV, sometimes even in the wee hours.  From the very first time I saw it, the two things that stuck in my mind was (1) the window and (2) the relationship between Jane Woman and Rock Hudson.  Of all movies to be mentioned in a book, I couldn't believe you picked this one.  Good choice!

 

I could visualize Cob being somewhat like Rock, but thinner and more rugged looking but I couldn't visualize Mary resembling anything like Jane Woman.  I picture Mary as thin, long straight hair and athletic like, whereas Jane is very country-club type, always dressed perfectly.  The only similarity is their relationship and you hit it dead on there.


 

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ssizemore
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Re: Questions for Joseph Mongering

Not good editing on my last post--whoops!

Of course, I meant ETOTW--in too big a hurry---and a missing apostrophe.  Sorry!

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aprilh
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

[ Edited ]

Sandy, I also pictured a round window while reading EOTW. I'm not sure if it was due to the way I read the description of the window or if my imagination just took over and invented the picture itself. I'll have to go back later and re-read that part. I saw the trailer for "All That Heaven Allows" (thanks to a posting someone wrote on one of the threads that it could be found on YouTube) and saw the window that we all read about. It looked very nice in the movie, but I've decided I like the way my imagination painted the window better! :smileyhappy:

 


ssizemore wrote:

 Just finished watching "All That Heaven Allows"--loved it.  It did, however, confirm what I used to teach my high school literature students and that is that your imagination can paint a very different picture of the written word.  First of all, I don't know why, but I pictured a round window--???  Both Jane Woman and Rock Hudson were too old to be Mary and Cob, but then this wasn't a movie of TOTE.  One of the tricks I used with my students was to have them read a book and then we would watch the movie in class.  Ninety percent of the students liked the book better when asked for a critique.  They always said that the characters or the setting or the action was all wrong.  When we read, we have a picture in our mind of what the people look like and a sense of place.  Isn't that what the director of a movie does too?  We shouldn't be surprised when our sense of it doesn't match his.

I did love seeing the movie--and the scenes containing the window added to my sense of place for Mary and Cobbs home.  Wouldn't you love to visit it?

Sandy


 

Hi Joe,

 

I wrote in some post (I don't even remember where) that "All That Heavens Allows" is one of my all time favorite movies.  I watch it every time it's on TV, sometimes even in the wee hours.  From the very first time I saw it, the two things that stuck in my mind was (1) the window and (2) the relationship between Jane Woman and Rock Hudson.  Of all movies to be mentioned in a book, I couldn't believe you picked this one.  Good choice!

 

I could visualize Cob being somewhat like Rock, but thinner and more rugged looking but I couldn't visualize Mary resembling anything like Jane Woman.  I picture Mary as thin, long straight hair and athletic like, whereas Jane is very country-club type, always dressed perfectly.  The only similarity is their relationship and you hit it dead on there.


 


 

April
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 

Page 203 in "Eternal on the Water"
"Hudson is apologetic about the mess, but Jane Wyman sees the potential in the building and says she would renovate it and bring it back to life. It is as different from her suburban house as a building could be, but it possesses an enormous round window overlooking a brook. The window is taller than a man, and easily as wide, and they share their first embrace in front of it."

aprilh wrote:

Sandy, I also pictured a round window while reading EOTW. I'm not sure if it was due to the way I read the description of the window or if my imagination just took over and invented the picture itself. I'll have to go back later and re-read that part. I saw the trailer for "All That Heaven Allows" (thanks to a posting someone wrote on one of the threads that it could be found on YouTube) and saw the window that we all read about. It looked very nice in the movie, but I've decided I like the way my imagination painted the window better! :smileyhappy:

 


ssizemore wrote:

 Just finished watching "All That Heaven Allows"--loved it.  It did, however, confirm what I used to teach my high school literature students and that is that your imagination can paint a very different picture of the written word.  First of all, I don't know why, but I pictured a round window--???  Both Jane Woman and Rock Hudson were too old to be Mary and Cob, but then this wasn't a movie of TOTE.  One of the tricks I used with my students was to have them read a book and then we would watch the movie in class.  Ninety percent of the students liked the book better when asked for a critique.  They always said that the characters or the setting or the action was all wrong.  When we read, we have a picture in our mind of what the people look like and a sense of place.  Isn't that what the director of a movie does too?  We shouldn't be surprised when our sense of it doesn't match his.

I did love seeing the movie--and the scenes containing the window added to my sense of place for Mary and Cobbs home.  Wouldn't you love to visit it?

Sandy


 

Hi Joe,

 

I wrote in some post (I don't even remember where) that "All That Heavens Allows" is one of my all time favorite movies.  I watch it every time it's on TV, sometimes even in the wee hours.  From the very first time I saw it, the two things that stuck in my mind was (1) the window and (2) the relationship between Jane Woman and Rock Hudson.  Of all movies to be mentioned in a book, I couldn't believe you picked this one.  Good choice!

 

I could visualize Cob being somewhat like Rock, but thinner and more rugged looking but I couldn't visualize Mary resembling anything like Jane Woman.  I picture Mary as thin, long straight hair and athletic like, whereas Jane is very country-club type, always dressed perfectly.  The only similarity is their relationship and you hit it dead on there.


 


 


 

 

Correspondent
ssizemore
Posts: 70
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Thanks!  So I didn't just invent that, huh?
Sunltcloud wrote:

 

Page 203 in "Eternal on the Water"
"Hudson is apologetic about the mess, but Jane Wyman sees the potential in the building and says she would renovate it and bring it back to life. It is as different from her suburban house as a building could be, but it possesses an enormous round window overlooking a brook. The window is taller than a man, and easily as wide, and they share their first embrace in front of it."

aprilh wrote:

Sandy, I also pictured a round window while reading EOTW. I'm not sure if it was due to the way I read the description of the window or if my imagination just took over and invented the picture itself. I'll have to go back later and re-read that part. I saw the trailer for "All That Heaven Allows" (thanks to a posting someone wrote on one of the threads that it could be found on YouTube) and saw the window that we all read about. It looked very nice in the movie, but I've decided I like the way my imagination painted the window better! :smileyhappy:

 


ssizemore wrote:

 Just finished watching "All That Heaven Allows"--loved it.  It did, however, confirm what I used to teach my high school literature students and that is that your imagination can paint a very different picture of the written word.  First of all, I don't know why, but I pictured a round window--???  Both Jane Woman and Rock Hudson were too old to be Mary and Cob, but then this wasn't a movie of TOTE.  One of the tricks I used with my students was to have them read a book and then we would watch the movie in class.  Ninety percent of the students liked the book better when asked for a critique.  They always said that the characters or the setting or the action was all wrong.  When we read, we have a picture in our mind of what the people look like and a sense of place.  Isn't that what the director of a movie does too?  We shouldn't be surprised when our sense of it doesn't match his.

I did love seeing the movie--and the scenes containing the window added to my sense of place for Mary and Cobbs home.  Wouldn't you love to visit it?

Sandy


 

Hi Joe,

 

I wrote in some post (I don't even remember where) that "All That Heavens Allows" is one of my all time favorite movies.  I watch it every time it's on TV, sometimes even in the wee hours.  From the very first time I saw it, the two things that stuck in my mind was (1) the window and (2) the relationship between Jane Woman and Rock Hudson.  Of all movies to be mentioned in a book, I couldn't believe you picked this one.  Good choice!

 

I could visualize Cob being somewhat like Rock, but thinner and more rugged looking but I couldn't visualize Mary resembling anything like Jane Woman.  I picture Mary as thin, long straight hair and athletic like, whereas Jane is very country-club type, always dressed perfectly.  The only similarity is their relationship and you hit it dead on there.