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ReadingPatti
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Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hi Joseph, I am enjoying your book very much. I love your characters. It is not eveyday that you get to meet your true love. Mary and Cobb are just a great couple. Mary is a strong woman. I don't know if I could not take that test to find out if I had a disease.

 

I love the girls(Chungamunga). They are great. It is kind of sad to know that most of them are sick. I pray that they get treatment for whatever is wrong with them.

 

I would love a very happy ending for Mary and Cobb. But knowing that will not happen, I can only hope that they have some time together and get married and enjoy each for what time they may have. I think that we need to grab hold of whatever love comes our way. Life is short so if you get a chance at a true love grab on and hold tight with all you might. Be very thankful for what God gives you.

 

Thank you for such a great read and a very thoughtful book.

 

I can't wait to read your next book.

 

ReadingPatti

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literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


thewanderingjew wrote:

For me, books are alive. I love carrying them, looking at the covers and guessing what is inside, reading the blurbs, the statements from other authors, reading the preface or introduction, checking the copyright, referring back to pages, scanning footnotes, acknowledgments, whathaveyou and literally enjoying them as adventures as new experiences, albeit vicarious ones. I need books as other people need food, although I do love food too! If people read ebooks, you can never again look over someone's shoulder and say, what are you reading? Is it good? It would be kind of rude to try and read someone's kindle...there is no readily available title page.

I recently bought 3 ebooks, whose name shall remain a secret, as holiday gifts for members of my family. They really are enjoying them. It took several weeks for them to get used to ordering and reading on them but they do like them. Books are not accessible immediately and I think that is a drawback. I would have thought it would be easier to create the electronic version immediately but the print copy is available first. To me, it seems the electronic copy has to be requested by many readers first. This will probably change if the ebooks become more universal.
I can imagine a future library being online or in a kiosk somewhere, a place where you plug in and download a book, as an adjunct to your computer when you are away and can't access a place to download one, or when your battery needs recharging. You can already do all sorts of downloads even on a plane or a train or in your car. All you would need is a port, power and wireless access for your particular machine.

What will happen to the beautiful buildings where people used to go, not only for the information but for the atmosphere of higher learning, for the knowledge of the librarian, for the experience itself. I used to go to the NY Public Library, the Grand Army Plaza Library and my town library which right now is in a shopping center as its beautiful new building is being erected. I always felt awed when I entered a library waiting for doors of knowledge to open. I just can't see an ebook in that same way.

I also think the price would really have to come down a lot to make it affordable to more people. You not only have to purchase the "machine", you then have to purchase the books and you have nothing to show for it. There are ways to share books with friends and family, but they are limited. It will be very lucrative for the companies producing them, that is for sure, but gone will be the historic living object, which we would find on a shelf and remember the experience of reading, of sharing with others and perhaps reread. The warm connection of a person to a book will no longer be a part of the experience.

I hope that libraries and hard copies of books remain for a long time. The other atmosphere, is too sterile and cold for me. Then again, I am such a dinosaur, the only thing I took to right away was the computer because of the world it opened up but the cell phone turned me off...it created an antisocial rude class of self important people whose blackberries interrupt you wherever you are, whose conversations they make you privy to as if you invited them into your lives, in restaurants, movies, theaters, lecture halls, etc. Whew, I guess I didn't hold back! :smileyhappy:

 


Hi thewanderingjew,

 

i used to go to the NY Public Library as a student and well into my adulthood.  I worked for a number of years on 5th Avenue and 43rd Street, just across the street from the library, and would always go there.  Even though I grew up in Brooklyn, it was easier for me to go to the NY Public Library than to get to the Grand Army Plaza Library.  There is nothing like the NY Public Library..

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Another beautiful library is the one in Boston on Boylston Street. I can't picture a library without shelves of books to browse and look at on any subject one could possibly think of...What will happen to librarians? What will take the place of books, emachines to borrow? I know you can't stop progress but, for me, change for the sake of change can have negative or unintended consequences.

Mr Monninger, what do you think the effect of this technology (ebooks) will be on book sales and subsequent financial returns for authors? I can see booksellers becoming ebook sellers with great financial reward, incurring far less costs and with far less need for human involvement in the process which will result in a loss of industries and jobs. 

I am wondering how an author will be able to protect his/her product so it is still amply rewarding for them. It was so difficult to protect music from being pirated. Will the same thing happen to books? I know it is a different technology but there are really smart people out there who just can't wait to abuse the system. It often takes authors months and even years to produce a book. There has to be ample remuneration to make it worth their while.

I hope the proliferation of these ebooks properly considers the authors and rewards them well and doesn't throw too many other people out of work. Maybe authors should get royalties for every download, (maybe they do already). We live in a soundbite society and everyone wants the easy way out for all things. I imagine if we could hire someone to think for us (or even read for us), we might consider doing that as well. Well, maybe that is going a little too far...hmmm, maybe not! :smileywink:

literature wrote:

I used to go to the NY Public Library as a student and well into my adulthood.  I worked for a number of years on 5th Avenue and 43rd Street, just across the street from the library, and would always go there.  Even though I grew up in Brooklyn, it was easier for me to go to the NY Public Library than to get to the Grand Army Plaza Library.  There is nothing like the NY Public Library..

 

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Joseph-Monninger
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Interesting question about pirating books.  I guess that can happen.  I once heard that Stephen King novels are routinely ripped off in Asia.  Not sure if that is true...or if it's fair to Asia.  When you think about it, though, libraries also run afoul of copyright.  By lending books out -- not mine, but think how many "reads" a guy like King or Dr. Seus loses to libraries -- they sort of usurp the author's cut on the exchange.  In England and New Zealand they have something called a public lending incentive which tracks "borrows" from libraries.  At the end of the year, an author is cut a modest check.  Books are one of the few things we give out free to the public (well, they come from taxes, but you get the idea.)  It might make sense to have a fair policy for the life of the book and the author's family, then turn it over to the public domain...and to libraries.  So, in answer to your question, I'm less concerned about pirating electronic copies than you might have guessed.  

 

What do you think?  Publishing is a vast enterprise, believe me....

 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:
Another beautiful library is the one in Boston on Boylston Street. I can't picture a library without shelves of books to browse and look at on any subject one could possibly think of...What will happen to librarians? What will take the place of books, emachines to borrow? I know you can't stop progress but, for me, change for the sake of change can have negative or unintended consequences.

Mr Monninger, what do you think the effect of this technology (ebooks) will be on book sales and subsequent financial returns for authors? I can see booksellers becoming ebook sellers with great financial reward, incurring far less costs and with far less need for human involvement in the process which will result in a loss of industries and jobs. 

I am wondering how an author will be able to protect his/her product so it is still amply rewarding for them. It was so difficult to protect music from being pirated. Will the same thing happen to books? I know it is a different technology but there are really smart people out there who just can't wait to abuse the system. It often takes authors months and even years to produce a book. There has to be ample remuneration to make it worth their while.

I hope the proliferation of these ebooks properly considers the authors and rewards them well and doesn't throw too many other people out of work. Maybe authors should get royalties for every download, (maybe they do already). We live in a soundbite society and everyone wants the easy way out for all things. I imagine if we could hire someone to think for us (or even read for us), we might consider doing that as well. Well, maybe that is going a little too far...hmmm, maybe not! :smileywink:

literature wrote:

I used to go to the NY Public Library as a student and well into my adulthood.  I worked for a number of years on 5th Avenue and 43rd Street, just across the street from the library, and would always go there.  Even though I grew up in Brooklyn, it was easier for me to go to the NY Public Library than to get to the Grand Army Plaza Library.  There is nothing like the NY Public Library..

 


 

 

 

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Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Well shoot, all of the questions I had while I was reading have been answered, so I will just tell you that I really enjoyed your novel.  Your characters are real and the descriptions of the places they visited made me want to visit. 

 

Best of luck to you, I know Eternal on the Water will be a success. 

Inspired Contributor
nadine1
Posts: 41
Registered: ‎10-16-2007

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Huntington's Disease is the villain in this book.  It shortens the quality and quantity of time Cobb and Mary have together.
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

It's funny...a couple people have asked about the generally upbeat personalities in this book.  That never occurred to me!  But I think the comments are justified and accurate.  Hmmmm.  I need a villain!  Actually, I guess with some of the somberness of the subject -- no spoiler -- I felt I couldn't make people too ratty.  But I suspect I have an optimistic view of people....most of the people in my life are pretty good people.  No real villains.   


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nadine1
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

My former principal (I'm a teacher) would not allow the teachers to show movies in class because the students were supposed to read the rich words and text of the great pieces of literature.  However, nowadays, students learn in different ways (i.e. audio, visual, etc.) and/or have special needs.  A teacher who differentiates instruction by showing a movie or playing music in addition to the text may enhance the lesson and reach the students' multiple intelligences.
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns documentary on the subject be an adequate replacement?  Do we prejudice written text over visual text...and if so, why?  I have a hard time answering the question myself, and sometimes feel sort of stupid when I read a book with a class, then show a movie...(as most teachers do.)  Is the movie supposed to be a lesser rendering of the subject?  Am I supposed to compete with Ken Burns on Jazz if I am teaching music history?  Can the film Dr. Zhivago teach us enough about the Russian Revolution...without our needing to go into a long, detailed history in a text, assuming we are not going to become Russian history specialists?

 

 

Anyway, love talking about this sort of thing....thanks again...


 

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nadine1
Posts: 41
Registered: ‎10-16-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

I also wondered how you picked the names for the characters in the book.  For example, I grew up with Polly Peterson (Cobb's prom date, on page 272).  She was my neighbor and classmate. 
CleverTwenty wrote:

I am thrilled I was given the chance to read this. I wanted to thank you!

 

 

I have one question that has been eating at me...but that question has to wait.

 

As for now I am just curious, Why pick the name Mary and Jonathan AKA Cobb?


 

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

 

I am all for varied visual and audio aids when it comes to teaching, as an adjunct to the actual lesson. Teachers have to make it very clear to students that the movies etc., may not be totally factual and further investigation is required to learn the truth. Very often today, students think that historic fiction in a book or movie is enough knowledge. They believe soundbites give them the whole picture when, in fact, they get only a snapshot of the facts. In my opinion, if they only rely on that form of material, they will be poorly educated and ill informed. For instance, although we learn about Huntington's disease in the book, we only scratch the surface and if we want to really know, we must do further research. The book serves a purpose, though, because it might encourage someone to study further, about the disease.

nadine1 wrote:
My former principal (I'm a teacher) would not allow the teachers to show movies in class because the students were supposed to read the rich words and text of the great pieces of literature.  However, nowadays, students learn in different ways (i.e. audio, visual, etc.) and/or have special needs.  A teacher who differentiates instruction by showing a movie or playing music in addition to the text may enhance the lesson and reach the students' multiple intelligences.
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns documentary on the subject be an adequate replacement?  Do we prejudice written text over visual text...and if so, why?  I have a hard time answering the question myself, and sometimes feel sort of stupid when I read a book with a class, then show a movie...(as most teachers do.)  Is the movie supposed to be a lesser rendering of the subject?  Am I supposed to compete with Ken Burns on Jazz if I am teaching music history?  Can the film Dr. Zhivago teach us enough about the Russian Revolution...without our needing to go into a long, detailed history in a text, assuming we are not going to become Russian history specialists?

 

 

Anyway, love talking about this sort of thing....thanks again...


 


 

 

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MKDeanna
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎12-02-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Joe,

 

Thank you so much for allowing us to be a part of this process.  Your book is moving and inspirational.  It reminds us to live each day to its fullest since we never know what tomorrow will bring. 

 

Your question of movies vs books is an interesting one.  My son has a learning disability and does not retain what he reads.  He loves to read books and is a great reader, but it does not stay in his mind.  In addition to discussing books as he reads them, movies are a great tool to reinforce the things that he reads.  As a visual learner, the stimulation truly brings the reading to life.  It certainly shouldn't be a replacement, but I see it as a welcome asset, especially for my son and others like him.

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Sadie1
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Registered: ‎07-16-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns doc


I think watching a movie isn't the same as reading a book.  No where near the same.  I have a 17 year old.  I taught him to read books from a very young age.  He spends his hard earned lawn mowing money now on books.  He does have a healthy supply of video games too.  But, he reads and he loves to read.
Books allow us to build up our imaginations.  Movies don't.  Movies have the scenery all there for us.  But a book allows us to imagine that scenery in our own minds.  We need to use our brains or we are going to lose them, so when I read a book, I am using those brain cells.  Watching a movie, my brain is numbed out some.
Also, due to time restraints, movies cut a lot out that can be included in a book.
I don't care to read ebooks.  I enjoy having that book in my hands.  I can just see me know laying in bed with a computer in my hands reading..when I fall asleep and that computer drops to the floor, it's going to break.  The book will be okay in the morning and it also won't wake me up when it crashes to the floor.  LOL!
Lisa in Georgia
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Joseph-Monninger
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-28-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

I'm interested in your comments because again books are privileged over movies.  I teach with a woman who would argue that everything is a text....even shopping circulars.  She would say, I think, that we don't know for sure if we are reading the same book.  When you read Eternal on the Water, you bring to bear all your past experience and knowledge.  So do I when I read books.  But does the text remain the same?  My goodness, when you consider some of the reviews a book gets -- even right here in First Look Country -- you can see people read through a lens they make themselves.  

 

If we grant that books mean different things to different people, then why stop there?  If we supply the details with our imagination, why not simply read an outline of a book....and fill it in with our own interpretations?  I had a friend who read book jackets for two months and engaged people in conversation.  In time he couldn't remember if he had actually read the book or simply read the jacket.  He invented the entire book, you see.  And during the conversation, he believed the two people discussing the book came up with a third meaning of the book....a shared vision of it.

 

I dare say a good documentary could teach us as much about the history of baseball (again Ken Burns) as a book on the same subject.  And as to imagination....Avatar certainly stirred my imagination with its visual rendering of the world.  So did Lord of the Rings years ago.  My son read the Hobbit and loved it, but he found the other Ring books slow going.  So he watched the movies.  Did he really miss something?  Or did he have the same experience...or close enough....as someone who read them all?  Could you watch the Harry Potter movies and have roughly the same experience as those who have read them?  I would argue maybe....

 

Anyway, provocative questions and ideas.  I like talking about this stuff.  I wrote a column for years about common, everyday topics mostly revolving around education.  I am against homework, for instance, and that always got people going.  

 

Thanks again for airing your views.  I'd love to hear more....


Sadie1 wrote:

Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns doc


I think watching a movie isn't the same as reading a book.  No where near the same.  I have a 17 year old.  I taught him to read books from a very young age.  He spends his hard earned lawn mowing money now on books.  He does have a healthy supply of video games too.  But, he reads and he loves to read.
Books allow us to build up our imaginations.  Movies don't.  Movies have the scenery all there for us.  But a book allows us to imagine that scenery in our own minds.  We need to use our brains or we are going to lose them, so when I read a book, I am using those brain cells.  Watching a movie, my brain is numbed out some.
Also, due to time restraints, movies cut a lot out that can be included in a book.
I don't care to read ebooks.  I enjoy having that book in my hands.  I can just see me know laying in bed with a computer in my hands reading..when I fall asleep and that computer drops to the floor, it's going to break.  The book will be okay in the morning and it also won't wake me up when it crashes to the floor.  LOL!
Lisa in Georgia

 

 

 

Obviously, this will have a big impact on education.  Believe me, I'm not saying we shouldn't read.  I am simply wondering out loud if visual stimulation through movies and so on isn't the equivalent.  Could a person be "well educated" (whatever that means exactly) by simply watching movies?  

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PB684
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎08-03-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

I am all for varied visual and audio aids when it comes to teaching, as an adjunct to the actual lesson. Teachers have to make it very clear to students that the movies etc., may not be totally factual and further investigation is required to learn the truth. Very often today, students think that historic fiction in a book or movie is enough knowledge. They believe soundbites give them the whole picture when, in fact, they get only a snapshot of the facts. In my opinion, if they only rely on that form of material, they will be poorly educated and ill informed. For instance, although we learn about Huntington's disease in the book, we only scratch the surface and if we want to really know, we must do further research. The book serves a purpose, though, because it might encourage someone to study further, about the disease.

nadine1 wrote:
My former principal (I'm a teacher) would not allow the teachers to show movies in class because the students were supposed to read the rich words and text of the great pieces of literature.  However, nowadays, students learn in different ways (i.e. audio, visual, etc.) and/or have special needs.  A teacher who differentiates instruction by showing a movie or playing music in addition to the text may enhance the lesson and reach the students' multiple intelligences.
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns documentary on the subject be an adequate replacement?  Do we prejudice written text over visual text...and if so, why?  I have a hard time answering the question myself, and sometimes feel sort of stupid when I read a book with a class, then show a movie...(as most teachers do.)  Is the movie supposed to be a lesser rendering of the subject?  Am I supposed to compete with Ken Burns on Jazz if I am teaching music history?  Can the film Dr. Zhivago teach us enough about the Russian Revolution...without our needing to go into a long, detailed history in a text, assuming we are not going to become Russian history specialists?

 

 

Anyway, love talking about this sort of thing....thanks again...


 


 I am really glad that we are having this discussion. I have read the many posts and differing opinions and can mostly see both sides. It is a topic that my husband and I discuss quite often because our teenage daughter tells us that they watch movies quite often in her English classes in addition to, or sometimes as opposed to reading the actual piece of literature. I definitely agree with what thewanderingjew posted about it being usefull when used as "an adjunct to the actual lesson". I'm not so sure it can replace reading the classics. I agree, for example, that it is difficult to read Shakespeare but I don't feel that watching a film of Romeo and Juliet can take the place of tackling the wonderful language found in the book. Part of the experience is trying to figure out the language...at least that is how I feel. I agree, however, that watching a film version (hopefully one that is true to the period and the author) can inhance a student's understanding and appreciation of the work. I have a problem when the movie selection is a Leo Di Caprio "rap" version...and I know that this appeals to a broad range of kids but it shouldn't be the only exposure that they get. I hope I am not offending anyone because I don't mean to but I do feel very strongly about this and am glad to read other's opinions.

Paula 

PS no offense to Leo DiCaprio, I think he is a fine actor :smileyhappy:

 

PB684
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PB684
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎08-03-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

[ Edited ]

thewanderingjew wrote:

 

I am all for varied visual and audio aids when it comes to teaching, as an adjunct to the actual lesson. Teachers have to make it very clear to students that the movies etc., may not be totally factual and further investigation is required to learn the truth. Very often today, students think that historic fiction in a book or movie is enough knowledge. They believe soundbites give them the whole picture when, in fact, they get only a snapshot of the facts. In my opinion, if they only rely on that form of material, they will be poorly educated and ill informed. For instance, although we learn about Huntington's disease in the book, we only scratch the surface and if we want to really know, we must do further research. The book serves a purpose, though, because it might encourage someone to study further, about the disease.

nadine1 wrote:
My former principal (I'm a teacher) would not allow the teachers to show movies in class because the students were supposed to read the rich words and text of the great pieces of literature.  However, nowadays, students learn in different ways (i.e. audio, visual, etc.) and/or have special needs.  A teacher who differentiates instruction by showing a movie or playing music in addition to the text may enhance the lesson and reach the students' multiple intelligences.
Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns documentary on the subject be an adequate replacement?  Do we prejudice written text over visual text...and if so, why?  I have a hard time answering the question myself, and sometimes feel sort of stupid when I read a book with a class, then show a movie...(as most teachers do.)  Is the movie supposed to be a lesser rendering of the subject?  Am I supposed to compete with Ken Burns on Jazz if I am teaching music history?  Can the film Dr. Zhivago teach us enough about the Russian Revolution...without our needing to go into a long, detailed history in a text, assuming we are not going to become Russian history specialists?

 

 

Anyway, love talking about this sort of thing....thanks again...


 

sorry, the last post seemed to disappear when I submitted it so I tried again.

 

 

PB684
Correspondent
mamawli
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎03-13-2009
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

It is amazing that you brought up Ken Burns and his documentaries.  I was able to hear him speak at my daughters graduation from the University of Delaware.  He was a very boring speaker and showed no personality, I would have preferred a good book to his speech. 

Wordsmith
BookWoman718
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hello Joe,

 

This is a message I posted a couple of weeks ago on the thread that welcomed you to First Look.  In it I posted a question, so I think I should have posted it here instead.  I apologize for the duplication.

 

Hello again Joseph,

 

First of all, I want to thank you for treating Mary's resolve to decide the moment and the means of her own death in such a sympathetic and respectful manner.  I wish our laws and the ethical beliefs behind them displayed such understanding and allowed for that kind of compassion for the patient and family facing end-of-life issues.  Despite spelling out wishes in a Living Will and writing very specific instructions to an executor and heirs, most of us must live with knowing that some unwanted medical intervention may well keep us alive in some desperate situation we want no part of.  I pray books like "EOtW"  move us in a more open and loving direction. 

 

Second,  I think your vivid descriptions led me to persist in 'seeing' more than 'hearing' the characters you wrote.  The wonderful settings were so real and so much a part of the story, from the green wilderness of the river, right through to the round window, all the visuals were powerful.   The voices were, too, of course, but I admit I have no sense of the timbre of Cobb's voice or the pace of Mary's speech, for instance.  The words were often wise;  I appreciated that.  The stories were touching, clever, imaginative.  

 

In a certain sense, this story of a perfect love mirrored the animal tales.   I find Mary and Wally as charming but essentially unbelievable as Bunny and Madrid.  All the good guys (almost everybody in the book) are so completely and totally GOOD;  generous, wise, forgiving, even-tempered, faithfully loving.  Are we to understand that the book, like the stories within it, is a vehicle meant to charm and teach, rather than depict a realistic relationship in the real world?   Please understand, I enjoyed the book as a whole, and found parts of it beautifully written, instructive in an enthralling way.  This is surely how friends SHOULD be made, and how they SHOULD support, this is how a mother, a brother, a father SHOULD act.  This is, maybe, even how love SHOULD manifest itself?   But does it, really?   Over a period of years?

 

So I am left wondering, is this meant to be a realistic novel?  Or is it meant as a beautiful modernistic fable?

 

Again, thanks so much for joining us!

Correspondent
retromom
Posts: 113
Registered: ‎02-02-2008
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Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

[ Edited ]

 


Joseph-Monninger wrote:

One more thing....I really love this subject and I have a lifelong interest in education, so please bear with me....When kids ask why they can't watch a movie instead of reading a book, I wonder what the group here would say.  Should teachers insist they read a text of, say, the Civil War....or would watching the Ken Burns doc


I sometimes am disappointed in the film version of books that I have read. The film can sometimes come out not at all how I imagined a story in my head. My kids have seen film versions in school of books they should be reading. It drives me nuts! I think you miss so much by not reading the printed word.

 

Beth

http://bookaholicmom.blogspot.com/
Author
Joseph-Monninger
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-28-2009

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Wow, I never saw that question coming.  I meant it as a realistic novel, but I am intrigued that you see it as a fable.  Or maybe as a fable.  Either would be okay with me.  But to answer the question again, yes, I see the world pretty much the way Cobb sees it.  Obviously, the world has plenty of bad guys, but in telling a story to a ranger around a campfire, I'm not sure Cobb would feel compelled to talk about the darker aspects of personalities.  Hmmmm.  Very interesting.  Thanks for asking this...it has me thinking.  


BookWoman718 wrote:

Hello Joe,

 

This is a message I posted a couple of weeks ago on the thread that welcomed you to First Look.  In it I posted a question, so I think I should have posted it here instead.  I apologize for the duplication.

 

Hello again Joseph,

 

First of all, I want to thank you for treating Mary's resolve to decide the moment and the means of her own death in such a sympathetic and respectful manner.  I wish our laws and the ethical beliefs behind them displayed such understanding and allowed for that kind of compassion for the patient and family facing end-of-life issues.  Despite spelling out wishes in a Living Will and writing very specific instructions to an executor and heirs, most of us must live with knowing that some unwanted medical intervention may well keep us alive in some desperate situation we want no part of.  I pray books like "EOtW"  move us in a more open and loving direction. 

 

Second,  I think your vivid descriptions led me to persist in 'seeing' more than 'hearing' the characters you wrote.  The wonderful settings were so real and so much a part of the story, from the green wilderness of the river, right through to the round window, all the visuals were powerful.   The voices were, too, of course, but I admit I have no sense of the timbre of Cobb's voice or the pace of Mary's speech, for instance.  The words were often wise;  I appreciated that.  The stories were touching, clever, imaginative.  

 

In a certain sense, this story of a perfect love mirrored the animal tales.   I find Mary and Wally as charming but essentially unbelievable as Bunny and Madrid.  All the good guys (almost everybody in the book) are so completely and totally GOOD;  generous, wise, forgiving, even-tempered, faithfully loving.  Are we to understand that the book, like the stories within it, is a vehicle meant to charm and teach, rather than depict a realistic relationship in the real world?   Please understand, I enjoyed the book as a whole, and found parts of it beautifully written, instructive in an enthralling way.  This is surely how friends SHOULD be made, and how they SHOULD support, this is how a mother, a brother, a father SHOULD act.  This is, maybe, even how love SHOULD manifest itself?   But does it, really?   Over a period of years?

 

So I am left wondering, is this meant to be a realistic novel?  Or is it meant as a beautiful modernistic fable?

 

Again, thanks so much for joining us!


 

 

Inspired Contributor
tweezle
Posts: 75
Registered: ‎11-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Hello Mr. Monniger!

 

I'm very late to this conversation, but would like to say "thank you" for the chance to read your book and participate here. Your Q&A has been very enlightening, and it's always a pleasure getting to "know" an author better.

 

Thank you!!

“Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.” - Mason Cooley
**3 NOOKS with 3 separate accounts in one household.**
Inspired Contributor
JuneC
Posts: 44
Registered: ‎12-01-2009

Re: Questions for Joseph Monninger

Mr. Monninger, 

Not being familiar with the Rock Hudson movie All That Heaven Allows a friend and I checked youtube.  Sure enough there was the trailer. The window is in a few scenes and beautiful it is!   We were wondering how you came to use this in your book.  Is there a particular meaning you attribute to the window? 

I related to the renovation and the installation scene in the book.  It brought back wonderful memories of my first house and the people who helped us make it a home.