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CathyB
Posts: 271
Registered: ‎12-30-2006
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

Barb: Love this thought. 

 

CathyB

 


hookedonbooks09 wrote:

Once again, I'm struck by the names Erick has chosen and their apparent symbolism.  Monarch Street would indicate to me the changing or metamorphosis of it's namesake, the butterfly.  Mists coming and going, stairs lengthening and shortening, Meridia invisible and then not, etc.  Also, when a Monarch goes through its changes, it is silent, dark and withdrawn.

 

And then there is Orchard Street.  Where one bad apple (Malin!) lives.  Things here are growing---even tangling, they are are so overgrown.  Bright and airy.  Just what you need for fruitfulness!

 

 

Barb


 

 

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hookedonbooks09
Posts: 128
Registered: ‎02-04-2009
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Re: 24 Monarch Street


rkubie wrote:

Comments by Sunltcloud and lobugs make an interesting point:

 

Where are we in time and place? What country, what age? 

 

If it is impossible to answer that question, what effect does that disorientation have on you while you're reading?


 

These are good questions!  I have been on uneven footing since the beginning of the book, but not minding it at all!  I think it adds a bit to the mystery of the book on the whole, and it's not choppy, but instead it flows.  In and out, back and forth.

 

Just when I felt there was an Eastern feeling, something would throw me off.  Then, when I was sure it was modern times, I could almost picture Gabriel in a Mr. Rochester kind of garb.

 

Maybe we, the readers, are on our own sliding staircases, eh?

 

Barb

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. ~Groucho Marx
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ScribeMK
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎03-30-2009

Re: 24 Monarch Street

I agree with Barb and Scarpettajunkie (I too love her books) the time is of no consecunse (spell). It is how you perseive and relate to it. As a child I was raised as an only child. There was no time for me so I had quiet an imaginiation and read a lot!! We didn't watch TV like people do now. There were people with oddities that I had my own discriptive names for them and ghosts that wondered the house and grounds.

I also believe that Daniels house holds a lot of secrets that we have yet to see. As all houses do, don't you think?

It doesn't matter what a house is made of, it is what one makes of it. The people that live in it will set the atmosphere. Everyone wishes they had / have a warm and comfy home but that is not always the case. Meridia is now going from one extreme to the other or is she???

Scribe
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Shannanlee
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

I feel that Monarch street is dark and cold. Full of coldness, resentment and hate. Its is not a very nice place to live. The environment lacks nuturing and not very conducive for a child.

 

Orchard Street has a different feel. It seems warm, less cold, there has not been any resentment or hate built up. 

 

 

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BookWoman718
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎01-28-2007

Re: 24 Monarch Street


rkubie wrote:

Comments by Sunltcloud and lobugs make an interesting point:

 

Where are we in time and place? What country, what age? 

 

If it is impossible to answer that question, what effect does that disorientation have on you while you're reading?


 

I usually find a sense of place to be one of the more important components of a well-told story, and I did find it disorienting at times that we had so little information.  It often flowed as though it were an earlier period, no modern technology appeared at all.  But then there would be a piece of dialogue that felt so modern-slangy that it was jarring.  ("Is Mama giving you the third degree?  he teased..."    Doesn't sound like an ancient fairy tale. )   All in all, though, it was just one more instance of having to suspend one's feeling of reality. 
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Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

I had the same problem with the language in dialogue until I told myself to stop trying to categorize the story.

 

The nurse on page 21: "This house will be warm again, and those bastards will fight for a seat at the table."

 

On page 19 the doctor orders a soft diet and pampering for Ravenna to which Gabriel says: "Horse**bleep**!"


BookWoman718 wrote:

 

I usually find a sense of place to be one of the more important components of a well-told story, and I did find it disorienting at times that we had so little information.  It often flowed as though it were an earlier period, no modern technology appeared at all.  But then there would be a piece of dialogue that felt so modern-slangy that it was jarring.  ("Is Mama giving you the third degree?  he teased..."    Doesn't sound like an ancient fairy tale. )   All in all, though, it was just one more instance of having to suspend one's feeling of reality. 

 

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klpm
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎05-03-2009
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

I think that there is purposely no time or place because this isn't a magic-ing up of an existing place but a new and unique place all of its own.  We don't need a time because there would be no context for it.  It's not in our own historical timeline.  The place is just "somewhere else".  This way, we can accept the magic that happens as possible.
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Em18966
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎04-08-2009
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

The houses we settle into and move out of through the course of Bees and Mist have extraordinary "personalities" of their own. How would you describe 24 Monarch Street, and what is it like for Meridia to grow up here? Is this house a home?

 

It was a house where the inhabitants emotions were manifested physically.  And with the amount of anger and negativity that went on in it, it really had to have been unpleasant and traumatic for Meridia to spend her childhood there.  But probably not any more so than for any child who has had to endure growing up in a broken, unhappy home. 

 

What is behind the house's magical qualities?

 

I don't think the house had any itself.  I believe that all of the magic was a result of its occupants.

 

How does this house fit into the town around it, with the strange market?

 

It fit in perfectly.  It reminded me of the movie Stardust, you know, the market town on the enchanted side of the wall?

 

we get a glimpse of 27 Orchard. What does Meridia see in that house that isn't in her own house?

 

Warmth and light. 

 

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: 24 Monarch Street

[ Edited ]

I think the house at 24 Monarch Street is just as much a character in this book as the others, a living, breathing character. It has a personality manifested by the mist, mirrors, and choices. It muffles footsteps, and even denies the ability for a visitor to knock and announce themselves. The house refuses to be "hospitable" by picking people up, stealing hats, and chasing them away with scary sounds. It is cold, reflecting the emotionless exhistance of its inhabitants. It will move its staircases at whim, making it impossible to get to a destination when you decide to get there. The mirrors reflect other times and places, leading me to believe it has been around for a long time. It makes me wonder what it would be like with a happy family inside. While I don't think it is a home right now, it could be with love inside.

 

I think Meridia would have had to learn patience while living in this house due to the staircases, and also fear from watching what happens to visitors. But, she takes it in stride and moves through her days.  

 

The market appears to fit in nicely with the house. The descriptions fit with what I would expect around a living house. The herbs growing on the woman's body and the tattooed man who swallowed radishes only to spit them back out cut up and pickled made me cringe. But at the same time, it was a fun place to visit from the outside. <grin> Ravenna was not bothered by anything at the market, so it must have been normal to her. 

 

Meridia sees the house at 27 Orchard very differently than her own. Her house was a building with people inhabiting it. Daniel's house seemed like a home with a family inside. We will see how close that is to the truth.

 

Message Edited by DSaff on 06-02-2009 11:38 AM
DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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PiperMurphy
Posts: 174
Registered: ‎09-19-2008

Re: 24 Monarch Street


DSaff wrote:

I think the house at 24 Monarch Street is just as much a character in this book as the others, a living, breathing character. It has a personality manifested by the mist, mirrors, and choices. It muffles footsteps, and even denies the ability for a visitor to knock and announce themselves. The house refuses to be "hospitable" by picking people up, stealing hats, and chasing them away with scary sounds. It is cold, reflecting the emotionless exhistance of its inhabitants. It will move its staircases at whim, making it impossible to get to a destination when you decide to get there. The mirrors reflect other times and places, leading me to believe it has been around for a long time. It makes me wonder what it would be like with a happy family inside. While I don't think it is a home right now, it could be with love inside.

 

Message Edited by DSaff on 06-02-2009 11:38 AM

What if the house is providing its own protection in its own way? On page 18 is says, "It happened one night while the house was asleep." Since I'm taking what I read at face value, I thought Hey, what if the house is literally alive? I think that what is happening in the house is a manifestation of the emotions and turmoil of the inhabitants, and that the actions of the inhabitants bring life to a house. Maybe in the case the life is real and the house is reacting.

"When I have a little money, I buy books; and if I have any left, I buy food and clothes."
~Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus~
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DSaff
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

I do think that the house is alive and protecting itself, Piper. It is an interesting concept, huh?


PiperMurphy wrote:

What if the house is providing its own protection in its own way? On page 18 is says, "It happened one night while the house was asleep." Since I'm taking what I read at face value, I thought Hey, what if the house is literally alive? I think that what is happening in the house is a manifestation of the emotions and turmoil of the inhabitants, and that the actions of the inhabitants bring life to a house. Maybe in the case the life is real and the house is reacting.

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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libralady
Posts: 159
Registered: ‎09-23-2008
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

At a point in time, 24 Monarch Street was a normal house.  On p. 17 it says, "the house came alive every night to the sound of music.  Everywhere you looked there were flowers and candles, drinks served in tall glasses, lanterns twined over the garden."  After Meridia's birth, the house changed into a place where a mist guarded the entrance, the staircase had a mind of its own, the floors did not produce footsteps, mirrors were not normal,  darkness and cold existed in almost every room.  This is definitely not a home.  The house is alive, but not in a good way. At times, it appears that the house may be at odds or possibly doing battle with the inhabitants.
"Sow today what you want to reap tomorrow"
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Sassy398
Posts: 56
Registered: ‎11-03-2008
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

Absolutely the address Monarch st is in reference to the butterfly, and at one time

the house was beautiful as one. Somehow, the house was taken over by some very

bad sprits ect. Therefore, the house became cold and uninviting. As for the house at

27 Orchard it appears to be something Meridia has been lacking most of her life,which

is knowing how to really give and show compassion.

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vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

Ah, but is it really? She barely meets this family in Daniel's home and think of how Eva and Malin treat Permony. Is there any giving or showing of compassion there? And Daniel thinks this is ok too! I find it frightening from the get go. :smileywink:

 


Sassy398 wrote:

Absolutely the address Monarch st is in reference to the butterfly, and at one time

the house was beautiful as one. Somehow, the house was taken over by some very

bad sprits ect. Therefore, the house became cold and uninviting. As for the house at

27 Orchard it appears to be something Meridia has been lacking most of her life,which

is knowing how to really give and show compassion.


 

 

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Inspired Wordsmith
eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007

Re: 24 Monarch Street


rkubie wrote:

Comments by Sunltcloud and lobugs make an interesting point:

 

Where are we in time and place? What country, what age? 

 

If it is impossible to answer that question, what effect does that disorientation have on you while you're reading?


 

I think that the time and place has nothing to do with the story. Actually it can be anytime or anyplace where you have a sensitive, imaginative child like Meridia. If you recall, all these strange happenings began after she was born.

 

I keep thinking about Erick's personal letter to us, explaining how he never talked much. If you are not doing much talking, then you are observing a lot. Is Erick's book about family behavior and what it must seem like to an overly sensitive imaginative child?

 

If you live in a home where your father is having an affair and doesn't participate too much in what goes on in the house, could a sensitive child see her father's fantasy world in the form of mists surrounding him as he comes and goes? Would her mother's anger be viewed by a child as a lot of pots and pans banging and knives cutting off heads etc.?

 

This is what I keep thinking about as I am reading the book.

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
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AshALee
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-22-2008
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Re: 24 Monarch Street


rkubie wrote:

 

The houses we settle into and move out of through the course of Bees and Mist have extraordinary "personalities" of their own. How would you describe 24 Monarch Street, and what is it like for Meridia to grow up here? Is this house a home?

 

What is behind the house's magical qualities?

 

How does this house fit into the town around it, with the strange market?

 

we get a glimpse of 27 Orchard. What does Meridia see in that house that isn't in her own house?

 


24 Monarch Street is a home only to the sadness and anger that was conjured up by the mists and wrought upon the relationship of Ravenna and Gabriel.

 

In Orchard Street, Meridia sees the home and family, mother specifically, she's always wanted and dreamed of. 

 

 

www.bellasnovella.com
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Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006
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Re: 24 Monarch Street

I think the disorientation I feel in the story gives the author unlimited creative license.  He has no boundries and no controls to hinder his imagination.  Anything can and may happen.  For me, the reader, it feels a little disconcerting, adrift on a breeze.  All I can do is watch, observe and place the story in my own little world and see what happens next.
rkubie wrote:

Comments by Sunltcloud and lobugs make an interesting point:

 

Where are we in time and place? What country, what age? 

 

If it is impossible to answer that question, what effect does that disorientation have on you while you're reading?


 

Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
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Thayer
Posts: 195
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: 24 Monarch Street

To me the house on Monarch Street seems mischievous, like a spoiled child. The "negative behaviors" exhibited are like those of one seeking attention that is lacking.

 

In Orchard Street, I feel that at this point Meridia sees only what she wants to see. Her naivete and love for Daniel don't allow her to objectively view things there as they really are.

~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.
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Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: 24 Monarch Street


PaulH wrote:

I wonder if the address is symbolic of the Monarch Butterfly. The colors match the cover at least :smileywink:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does the house represent a sort of cocoon?


 

I was also thinking along the lines of Monarch butterflies....I love the idea that the house could represent a cocoon!
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Thayer
Posts: 195
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: 24 Monarch Street



PaulH wrote:

I wonder if the address is symbolic of the Monarch Butterfly. The colors match the cover at least :smileywink:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does the house represent a sort of cocoon?


Seems a bit volatile to be chrysalis-like.

 

~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.