Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man

Please post your comments and questions about Chapter 10 in this thread.
Stephanie
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man

I will get into some ideas about this chapter later. I think the ones about her time with her dad and her time with her daughter was much better written than and told than anything about the other "mighty queens" in her life. These two relationships were explored so much better, which makes this one of the better chapters.

 

Right now tho, I want to take exception to something lol. On page 192, talking about her dad being in trouble for killing a bear. Ok, here is my problem :smileywink:. He killed a bear with one shot from a 20 gauge?? I am from Oklahoma so I may have a different slant on this but also different knowledge too. First, its surprising to know her dad had a 20 gauge since it is considered a youth or woman's shotgun, men are more prone to have a 16 or 12 gauge. And this is mainly because of #2 which is..... A 20 gauge is the least powerful of all the shotguns, used mostly for practice shooting or bird and small game. He hit him once with a 20 gauge and the bear ran off and died??? LOL. either he hit that bear from two feet away in his chest, or this was just a little bear, a little bear, who could have been scared off instead of killed. Or worse, you just killed one that momma bear will be looking you up soon lol. I live out in the country and have my own 20 gauge, I know. :smileywink:

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Contributor
1ggprincess
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎09-26-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man

Well I personally don't know much about shotguns. But I want to agree with you on her describing her relationship with her father. She really delved into how she feels about him. What she thinks about him. What her daughter thinks about him. Much more descriptive than the actual women in her life. My thoughts are that she knows how she feels about her aunts and mother. Her relationship with her father was sad and strained and I'm sure something she had to work on. So something you worked on and thought about that much- of course you will be able to be more detailed.
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man

But the name of the book is The Mighty Queens. Yet these two relationships, the one with her daughter and the one with her father actually give us more of a story. They are more interesting. Heck, as we both said here, they are more detailed. The rest of the book to me actually was just ok. It was nice, there were some laughs. There is a commonality with us all that might make for a good advice colunmist but the things in the book other than these two storylines are so common place with us as to not lend much new to us as a book. Yes there are good one liners but well, I still think just adding even 50 more pages of character development of the other women in The Mighty Queens, why they were mighty, would have made this a meatier book, while still keeping a good balance of humor. I don't dislike the book at all. But, well ok, in the past 2 1/2 years there was only one book that I read and thought, this was ok but more of an airport read, just something light to keep you busy while getting from one place to another but not much else. Now this is the only other book in that time I feel this about. I think it will wind up as that kind of sale too without those "50" pages. (Number not really important, just what I mean by them.)

 


1ggprincess wrote:
Well I personally don't know much about shotguns. But I want to agree with you on her describing her relationship with her father. She really delved into how she feels about him. What she thinks about him. What her daughter thinks about him. Much more descriptive than the actual women in her life. My thoughts are that she knows how she feels about her aunts and mother. Her relationship with her father was sad and strained and I'm sure something she had to work on. So something you worked on and thought about that much- of course you will be able to be more detailed.

 

 

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man


1ggprincess wrote:
Well I personally don't know much about shotguns. But I want to agree with you on her describing her relationship with her father. She really delved into how she feels about him. What she thinks about him. What her daughter thinks about him. Much more descriptive than the actual women in her life. My thoughts are that she knows how she feels about her aunts and mother. Her relationship with her father was sad and strained and I'm sure something she had to work on. So something you worked on and thought about that much- of course you will be able to be more detailed.

Which still leads me to speculate that the book was named after Amy wrote it.  I do not get the sense that she set out to write about the "mighty queens" per se, or she would have put more time into their "stories."

 

Which is not to say that I haven't enjoyed the read a great deal.  Amy cuts to the chase with a zest for life and a human decency and a caring for others again and again

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Wordsmith
Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man

I cannot relate to the shotgun and all that, but having grown up on a farm and having started driving flatbeds and tractors as soon as I could reach the pedals, I really loved the diagram and the conviction shown by the country folk that they could muscle those trucks out of the mud. 
RJH
Contributor
RJH
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man

I agree with the other respondents. The relationship with her dad and daughter are definitely the most fleshed out stories.  My father married for the second time ten years ago and didn't invite his three daughters to the wedding. My youngest sister who was 18 at the time was totally devestated that he didn't invite her. He called us( we lived in three different states) two days before he took his vows and told us.

There was no possiblity to arrange travel in that short of time. I haven't had a relationship with my father since that occurence. I admire Amy for staying in her father's life through everything. Those relationships really do define character.

 

Inspired Correspondent
bookloverjb85
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎10-12-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Chapter 10 - The Marrying Man


RJH wrote:

I agree with the other respondents. The relationship with her dad and daughter are definitely the most fleshed out stories.  My father married for the second time ten years ago and didn't invite his three daughters to the wedding. My youngest sister who was 18 at the time was totally devestated that he didn't invite her. He called us( we lived in three different states) two days before he took his vows and told us.

There was no possiblity to arrange travel in that short of time. I haven't had a relationship with my father since that occurence. I admire Amy for staying in her father's life through everything. Those relationships really do define character.

 


I agree that there was more character development of her father and daughter.  I felt like I knew them better than the "mighty queens".  I liked this book a lot and I like that it shows how Amy changed through her life and the hardships that she has had.  I think that there should be more development of the "queens", though.

--Jen--

"A house without books is like a room without windows."--Horace Mann
Users Online
Currently online: 41 members 255 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: