Reply
Wordsmith
ponie
Posts: 359
Registered: ‎01-30-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Mothers and Daughters


skiibunny1213 wrote:

ponie wrote:

skiibunny1213 wrote:

___________

ponie wrote:

 

Well said skiibunny1213!  I just wish Grace could do what she is doing in a less (seemingly) disinterested and hurtful manner.  Are there not more encouraging ways to encourage "while still keeping enough space"? 

 ___________

 

It's possible, but think about it now that you've read most of the book... if your mother told you you are a witch would you believe her?  It seems like Grace is letting Connie figure it out on her own more out of necessity rather than because she is trying to make her daughter feel bad.  I think in Grace's eyes this is a growing experience for Connie.  And remember, she obviously cares deeply, hence the protection charm on the door.  I think Connie realizes later that Grace isn't aloof toward her at all, rather, they are so connected that verbal communication isn't necessary for them to know what is going on with the other. 

 

 

 

Message Edited by skiibunny1213 on 04-14-2009 05:21 PM

 

skiibunny1213 - check out my post earlier today on the Part II Chapter 15 - 21 thread...I own having judged Grace harshly and not giving her the credit she deserves. 

I love coming to new conclusions!!!  I love books, and conversations, and postings that make me do that!!!


Apologies ponie, I didn't see the other post!  I am still new to this type of forum, I feel like there are too many posts and not enough time to read them all!! :smileyhappy::smileyhappy:


 

no, no, no, no apologies necessary...you rightly responded to what you read and what I had put out there.  I just wanted you to know that I had changed.

And you are right , it's a full time job to keep up with all the posts on all the threads.  And there has been a lot of activity.  You do what you can...I enjoy your thought-ful posts...keep 'em coming!!!

ponie
Frequent Contributor
fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Mothers and Daughters


mamawli wrote:
I have been reading most of the responses about Mothers and Daughters and find that my viewpoint is entirely different from all of the others.  I feel that Grace ran away from her Mothers lifestyle and wanted to raise Connie in a different environment.  I also feel that Grace did not want to come back to that house and that is why she asked Connie to clean it up so that she could sell it. 

 

I think there is something to your observations.  I never felt Grace and Connie were at odds, just different.  There are always generational differences.   Grace is the first one to move far away.  (To another state).  But she still cannot denie who she is or where she came from.

MG

Contributor
jholcomb
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎02-03-2008

Re: Mothers and Daughters

I was not drawn to the character of Grace, even as the book progressed and she and Connie grew closer. She struck me as a bit of a caricature--the seemingly flaky but deceptively wise hippie.

 

Yes, their relationship is strained, but I feel like that grows out of Grace's response to her daughter. She has been downright dismissive--and apparently repetitively so, which comes across as nagging--of Connie's academic career. It is no wonder that Connie has found it difficult to accept her mother as Grace is when Connie does not get that from Grace.

Wordsmith
marciliogq
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎02-22-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Mothers and Daughters

Well I think the atittude of Grace in relation to Connie is a kind of complete indifference, although I believe in generation differences the most interesting in this discussion is the point of identification from Connie to her grandmother's acts. Grace's attitudes towards a feminine emancipantion is at the same time a kind of trial to be opposite to all her (Grace's) mother's attitudes or decisions, for example the absence of electricity, no radio in the house or any sign of "modernity". This "modernity" is perhaps what Grace prosecutes when lives with her mother and what she rejects in Connie - part of a group of women with a doctor's. Connie, indirectly has a strong connection to her grandmother's world. It'll be defined when the book is found. It collects past and present and builds up a new perspective of relationship.

From Deliverance Dane I have not much information but the little I have made me a bit revolted with the game of trues and lies in the judgement court and showed me how wrong people were when judged "witches"at Salem's trial.

 

Wordsmith
ponie
Posts: 359
Registered: ‎01-30-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Mothers and Daughters


marciliogq wrote:

Well I think the atittude of Grace in relation to Connie is a kind of complete indifference, although I believe in generation differences the most interesting in this discussion is the point of identification from Connie to her grandmother's acts. Grace's attitudes towards a feminine emancipantion is at the same time a kind of trial to be opposite to all her (Grace's) mother's attitudes or decisions, for example the absence of electricity, no radio in the house or any sign of "modernity". This "modernity" is perhaps what Grace prosecutes when lives with her mother and what she rejects in Connie - part of a group of women with a doctor's. Connie, indirectly has a strong connection to her grandmother's world. It'll be defined when the book is found. It collects past and present and builds up a new perspective of relationship.

From Deliverance Dane I have not much information but the little I have made me a bit revolted with the game of trues and lies in the judgement court and showed me how wrong people were when judged "witches"at Salem's trial.

 


 

I was impacted by that revolting-ness as well time after time.  From the Free Dictionary:

travesty of justice

a miscarriage of justice; an act of the legal system that is an insult to the system of justice.
Revolting, insulting, sad, tragic...I could go on....but you already get that.
ponie
Inspired Contributor
drbjaded
Posts: 41
Registered: ‎12-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Mothers and Daughters

What is Connie's relationship like with her mother?

Connie's relationship is a bit strained.  Connie is the intellectual type and her mother is more like a hippie child who likes to read auras and talks about your inner self.  Her mother doesn't seem at all interested in Connie's work or her degree.

 

We will come across number of mother-daughter relationships through the course of the novel. How do these women relate (or not) to each other?

They don't really relate to each other.  Prudence had no real connection with Mercy.  She didn't understand the need to have the book in the house and just didn't believe in the healing stuff like her mother and grandmother did.  The same thing with Connie and her mother and how they differ and education and how they should each live their life. 

 

What can we make out about Connie's grandmother, Sophia, from her house?

She was probably a practicer of alchemy as well from all the herbs and bottles in the house.  She was a very eccentric woman who didn't have a phone or electricity in her home either.

 

Do you get a sense of Mercy and Deliverance's relationship this early?

It's a little murky.  You really see Mercy as only a child and not really understanding what's going on with her mother.  She's more interested in playing than in working and doesn't seem to be as conservative as her mother.

 

I really like this book.  From the beginning I thought it would be kinda weird flashing back and forth but it's great.  I love it.  Thanks B&N.

"You cannot love life until you live the life you love."
Inspired Contributor
fifenhorn
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎01-26-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Mothers and Daughters

Connie doesn't seem to get along with her mother because she thinks her mom's flighty and a bit odd. She loves her mom, and that point comes across clearly, but her mom already knows what Connie has yet to learn...that she is part of a long line of something special. Connie dismisses her mom's "aura cleansing" and abilities...she gets impatient with her mom all too often when Grace seemingly puts her down. 

 

But yet, the signs are all there - the fact that she can "see" what her mom is doing, and that she knows ahead of time what she will say.  Grace is just patiently waiting for the moment when Connie makes the discovery.