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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

I feel certain that there will be a strong connection between Connie and Deliverance. Grace seems to march to the beat of her own drummer and there is little background on Connie’s grandmother which makes me think that she did too. Perhaps the secrecy surrounding Granna involves her own odd habits or way of life. Maybe she wasn't so orderly and rigid as she was unusual and therefore, kept to herself. Her home is hidden from the street. Perhaps in the days when she walked the earth, the house was also hidden in some way or was isolated for a reason. The types of things growing in the garden also make you wonder what was the grandmother doing in her spare time?
The bottles in her grandmother's house made me think of the bottles of physicks in Deliverance's house. They also solidified my feeling that there is going to be a strong connection to Connie.

Connie's naivete concerning her seeming experiences with "a second or sixth sense" seemed a little unbelievable, at first, especially having grown up with a mom who was a bit out of the ordinary, a bit unfocussed or self absorbed and who believed in spirituality. Also, having studied witches/witchcraft, I would have thought her knowledge of the paranormal would be more extensive. When she finally decides to have a talk with her mom, I viewed her behavior as more of a tactic to avoid dealing with her mom, who was not as rigid or defined in her behavior, as Connie seems to be, and who seems to have an unsettling effect on her daughter's psyche, as well.

For someone who seemed so structured, her decision to go to Marblehead seemed a bit out of character. She winds up in a place so uninhabitable, at first glance, that I was surprised she was able to stay there the first night. I think I would have had to spend days cleaning it up enough for me to consider staying there, if I was so fastidious.

I am wondering if Connie and her dog are the reincarnation of Deliverance and hers. The dog just showed up out of nowhere and "picked" her to follow home. Connie kind of shows up  out of nowhere in Marblehead and discovers Deliverance's existence!

I am enjoying all of the different avenues of thought that this book makes me travel. Guessing all the possible outcomes is actually fun.

twj

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

Extremism and fanaticism always prey on ignorance and fear. The witch hunts are just one example of their negative effects on society. There was a mob or bully mentality which evolved and also played a part. The hand of accusation and/or judgment could be brought down upon those that didn't go along with the prevailing ideas.

Unexplained phenomena needed a scapegoat. For some reason, even today, we need to blame someone or something for the unpleasant things that happen to us in life. Perhaps it is the heaviness of guilt that makes us want to either avoid or share the responsibility for the painful, unexplained events we experience that we feel we may have influenced in some way, even unintentionally.

The weak and "different" were preyed upon then and still are all over the world. Religious fanaticism throughout history has often demanded sacrificial lambs. Hopefully, our society will eventually evolve into a more inclusive and understanding one. This book won't resolve these issues but it does make one think about them.

twj

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Bonnie824
Posts: 951
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

:smileyhappy: My first thoughts were I love these characters. They are people I can relate to and still they are different enough from me that I can learn new things reading this book.

 

I loved that Connie went to Mount Holyoke- it is where my youngest daugher is, and most people here in NC have not heard of it, so I seldom read anything about it.

 

I love Sam, and the little romance sideline of him and Connie. The emotions coming from Connie are strong, but she also stays self-contained.

 

I felt so bad for Deliverance and it made me realize what a coward I am (or else smart and practical!) I would not have done any kind of healing, magic or not if I was back in those crazy days. I would have either played the game or moved into the wilderness with my little family.

 

So far, I am loving this book. It is interesting in historical detail, but also has a very human storyline that would apply to any age.

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Bonnie824
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6


aprilh wrote:

Did anyone else get the feeling that Professor Chilton is up to something? Something about the way he kept smiling at Connie in their meeting when she showed him the paper with Deliverance Dane's name written on it struck me as odd. I'm not sure if he's just a little condescending to her or if there is something more. I think my suspicions were also heightened when Connie overheard him yelling on the phone. When she asked him about his project for the Colonial Association, he just played it off saying there was more time for that later and started smiling at her again. Interesting how at the end of the meeting the only word she could use to describe his smile to herself was "hungry".

The descriptions in this book are wonderful. They are so vivid, they make you feel as if you are really there. I'm loving this book so far. Very well written!


 

I had the idea he was just planning on using her research and ideas for himself, but it may end up being more sinister than that.
gl
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gl
Posts: 128
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

tetragrammaton

This is the definition that I found on dictionary.com

 

tetragrammaton Greek for ‘four letters’, that is the sacred Hebrew name for God, the consonants YHWH (Exod. 3: 15); but because it was considered too holy to pronounce, Adonai (‘Lord’) was substituted by readers of the text.

 

http://www.reference.com/search?q=tetragrammaton

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Bonnie824
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6


rose1957 wrote:

This is my first time using the B&N online book club and am not sure how I can post a new comment without replying to a previous one.  I have not read an entire book in years (only magazine articles).  I just discovered the First Look Book Club and am now reading The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane and cannot put it down!!  I, too, agree that Professor Chilton is up to something but am not sure what. 


 

You already did it Rose. Just hit on top of the moderators main post instead of on individual ones.
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thewanderingjew
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

I too had the feeling that the Professor was using Connie for his own designs. It was almost as if he wanted her to hear his conversation on the phone, speaking loudly and not asking her to leave directly, before he spoke at all about his project or the deadlines.

I found the meeting with Sam a bit contrived. To just happen upon a painter who happened to have an education and an interest in Connie's field, seemed a little contrived. Then again, it is moving the plot along and allowing another part of Connie's personality to show itself.
twj


Bonnie824 wrote:


aprilh wrote:

Did anyone else get the feeling that Professor Chilton is up to something? Something about the way he kept smiling at Connie in their meeting when she showed him the paper with Deliverance Dane's name written on it struck me as odd. I'm not sure if he's just a little condescending to her or if there is something more. I think my suspicions were also heightened when Connie overheard him yelling on the phone. When she asked him about his project for the Colonial Association, he just played it off saying there was more time for that later and started smiling at her again. Interesting how at the end of the meeting the only word she could use to describe his smile to herself was "hungry".

The descriptions in this book are wonderful. They are so vivid, they make you feel as if you are really there. I'm loving this book so far. Very well written!


 

I had the idea he was just planning on using her research and ideas for himself, but it may end up being more sinister than that.

 

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Bonnie824
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Connie and Arlo


CathyB wrote:

I didn't even consider the possibility of the garden and the plumbing being out of whack. I assumed that since the book is about the salem witch trials and the author seems to be going down the path that witchcraft may have been practiced that there was something special about the house. Enchanted perhaps - for lack of another word.

 

CathyB


 

I agree Cathy. Mercy made an apple grow there by touching it. It would make sense that some magic would stay in the garden. The plumbing was explained in that the house had only been empty 20 years and some renovations were done.
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aprilh
Posts: 424
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6


PB684 wrote:

(snip)

 

Has anyone else picked up on the fact that the building that Connie and Liz inhabit at Harvard, Saltonstall Court, bears the same name as the cross-examining lawyer in Deliverance Dane's trial in 1682?

 


I love that you brought this up. While reading about the lawyer I knew I had seen the name Saltonstall somewhere else but couldn't seem to find it anywhere. It was driving me crazy! Thanks for pointing it out to me!

April
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Bonnie824
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6


mgorbatjuk wrote:
I really like the book so far. I'm scared to death of the house though. I think something bad is going to happen in the house. I agree about Prof Chilton about being up to something funny. I don't know how evil he really is or if it's just snobbyness that makes him the way he is.

 

Even without evil, I can't imagine staying in a house that had been empty 20 years without a phone or electricity. The snake alone would have sent me to the motel.
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debbook
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6


Bonnie824 wrote:

aprilh wrote:

Did anyone else get the feeling that Professor Chilton is up to something? Something about the way he kept smiling at Connie in their meeting when she showed him the paper with Deliverance Dane's name written on it struck me as odd. I'm not sure if he's just a little condescending to her or if there is something more. I think my suspicions were also heightened when Connie overheard him yelling on the phone. When she asked him about his project for the Colonial Association, he just played it off saying there was more time for that later and started smiling at her again. Interesting how at the end of the meeting the only word she could use to describe his smile to herself was "hungry".

The descriptions in this book are wonderful. They are so vivid, they make you feel as if you are really there. I'm loving this book so far. Very well written!


 

I had the idea he was just planning on using her research and ideas for himself, but it may end up being more sinister than that.

 

I am very intrigued to see what he is up to!
A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
"bookmagic418.blogspot.com
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debbook
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

Agreed! And I would have to have given the house a good scrubbing

Bonnie824 wrote:

mgorbatjuk wrote:
I really like the book so far. I'm scared to death of the house though. I think something bad is going to happen in the house. I agree about Prof Chilton about being up to something funny. I don't know how evil he really is or if it's just snobbyness that makes him the way he is.

 

Even without evil, I can't imagine staying in a house that had been empty 20 years without a phone or electricity. The snake alone would have sent me to the motel.

 

A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
"bookmagic418.blogspot.com
Correspondent
nlsamson
Posts: 104
Registered: ‎03-18-2009

Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

[ Edited ]

I may be far off the mark, but I can't help but think that Professor Chilton, in his research, may have discovered a connection between Connie and Deliverance Dane. 


Bonnie824 wrote:


aprilh wrote:

Did anyone else get the feeling that Professor Chilton is up to something? Something about the way he kept smiling at Connie in their meeting when she showed him the paper with Deliverance Dane's name written on it struck me as odd. I'm not sure if he's just a little condescending to her or if there is something more. I think my suspicions were also heightened when Connie overheard him yelling on the phone. When she asked him about his project for the Colonial Association, he just played it off saying there was more time for that later and started smiling at her again. Interesting how at the end of the meeting the only word she could use to describe his smile to herself was "hungry".

The descriptions in this book are wonderful. They are so vivid, they make you feel as if you are really there. I'm loving this book so far. Very well written!


 

I had the idea he was just planning on using her research and ideas for himself, but it may end up being more sinister than that.

 

 

 

Message Edited by nlsamson on 03-30-2009 05:41 PM
"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away" - unknown
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DSaff
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

I had missed that piece. Thanks for pointing it out!


PB684 wrote:

Has anyone else picked up on the fact that the building that Connie and Liz inhabit at Harvard, Saltonstall Court, bears the same name as the cross-examining lawyer in Deliverance Dane's trial in 1682?

 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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DSaff
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

hahahahaha  :smileywink: Nice connection.


biljounc63 wrote:
Did anybody else pick up on the connection of this story and the last First Look book Sag Harbor? On page 70 Connie bought a small ice cream in a waffle cone. I could not help and wonder if she was at Jonnie Waffle:smileywink:

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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PiperMurphy
Posts: 174
Registered: ‎09-19-2008
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

I think you are very much on the mark. I think that Chilton has staked his reputation on the connection and needs Deliverance's book as proof. I'm curious  why Connie hasn't shown more curiousity about the contents of her house. She found the key in the Bible in the house. Wouldn't it follow that there are more clues there?

 

 


nlsamson wrote:

I may be far off the mark, but I can't help but think that Professor Chilton, in his research, may have discovered a connection between Connie and Deliverance Dane. 


Bonnie824 wrote:


aprilh wrote:

Did anyone else get the feeling that Professor Chilton is up to something? Something about the way he kept smiling at Connie in their meeting when she showed him the paper with Deliverance Dane's name written on it struck me as odd. I'm not sure if he's just a little condescending to her or if there is something more. I think my suspicions were also heightened when Connie overheard him yelling on the phone. When she asked him about his project for the Colonial Association, he just played it off saying there was more time for that later and started smiling at her again. Interesting how at the end of the meeting the only word she could use to describe his smile to herself was "hungry".

The descriptions in this book are wonderful. They are so vivid, they make you feel as if you are really there. I'm loving this book so far. Very well written!


 

I had the idea he was just planning on using her research and ideas for himself, but it may end up being more sinister than that.

 

 

 

Message Edited by nlsamson on 03-30-2009 05:41 PM

 

"When I have a little money, I buy books; and if I have any left, I buy food and clothes."
~Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus~
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mooks
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎03-24-2009

Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

When Sam shows Connie the TETRAGRAMMATON, Connie realizes that not only had people believed in the existence of witches but there were some people that sought to deflect or avoid harmful spells by casting spells of their own.  Witchcraft became more than a manifestation of discontent or a subversion of the social order.  I thought it was an interesting and important point that the witch trials and hysteria occured before the Scientific Revolution and that at that time there was no comprehension of causation.  Instead witchcraft was a force that people believed in and affected their behavior. 
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PB684
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Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

[ Edited ]

kren250 wrote:

I didn't think the house thing was very believable, either. In a small town, this house would've attracted notice. And I especially didn't buy the part where Liz turns on the faucet, and water comes out! The city would've turned the water off years before, if no one is paying the bills on the house. Plus, if the water was still turned on the pipes probably would've frozen and burst during the winter. And then there's the part where Connie is feeling on the wall for a light switch. Surely she would've realized the house would've had the power turned off long ago, if no one is paying the bill?! It was very convenient when it turns out the house isn't wired for electricity anyway.

 

 


krb2g wrote:

 

The plot point that was hardest for me to accept was the contrived way that Connie ended up at her grandmother's house in Marblehead. They could abandon it and not pay taxes for twenty years, and it's available, untouched (no squatters or kids making drug deals or anything) for Connie to clean, but it has to be done RIGHT NOW or ELSE? And then Grace is able to talk Connie (who seems to be remarkably focused and clear-headed about her school work) into doing it with almost no difficulty?

 


 

Although I see your point I think maybe you are getting too literal. I think sometimes you have to suspend your disbelief in order to enjoy a fantasy such as this. Another way to look at it might be to see the house and property as magical...after all, it belonged to a long line of witches!

-PB684

 

I'm editing my message because I've just read several other's posts and see that this has already been stated...sorry for the repetition:smileytongue: It's a little difficult not to respond before I've read everyone's posts but I'll try!

Message Edited by PB684 on 03-30-2009 07:08 PM
PB684
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Eckwell
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Re: Chpt 1-6, my thoughts

I totally agree with you on the stiffness of the binding.  I fought with the book the entire time I was reading it!
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Zeal
Posts: 258
Registered: ‎03-18-2009

Re: Part I, Chapters 1-6

I have found these first 6 chapters to be very interesting.  This time period in history is not one that I am familiar with, but I do find it very intriquing.  The transition between the 1900's and the 1600/1700's is fascinating. 

 

There are many similarites between Deliverance and Connie.  I surmised from the start that the two were some how related, and this prediction only grew stronger when Connie arrived at her Granna's house.  The secrecy surrounding the house (hidden in the over-growth, no electricity, no inhabitants for 20 years, etc.) made me feel as if something were amis.  When Arlo dug up the mandrake root, and Connie described it as, "...the most poisonous plants to man...legend had it that anyone who tried to dig one up himself would die on the spot..." (pg. 46) led me to believe that Granna knew a thing or two about witchcraft herself.  The discovery of the jars filled with "...unidentifiable powders leaves and syrups." (pg. 42) reminded me of natural healing remedies.  I am anxious to see how this develops.

 

I definitely agree with everyone else that Professor Chilton is up to something rotten, and that something could possibly be to use Connie's research as his own.  I found his character to be unlikable and untrustworthy from the very beginning.  Chilton is not someone I would have liked as a mentor.  I am sure that this part of the plot will thicken.  

 

   

"I learned to dream through reading, learned to create dreams through writing, and learned to develop dreamers through teaching. I shall always be a dreamer."
Sharon Draper