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Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

[ Edited ]

When I received miy copy, I couldn't get to it right away.  But when I did finally open it a few days ago, I was through six chapters before I was willing to put it aside for some of all the other reading that is in my currently reading stack (CRS).  I am looking forward to getting back to this and to the discussion here. 

 

Pepper

 

PS Besides TPS, my CSR is something like this:  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (LbW board), Beowulf (Epics Board),  Speaking of Faith (book group), Rapture Ready! (R&S board),  Annotated Alice (Classics board), Passage to India (to listen to), Great Books, Conversation Series 5 (GB group); workbook on the Beatitudes (Lent), and Seized by Max Hardberger (Current Affairs Sneak Peak -- great so far). Vanity Fair is still begging to be finished.  So, not sure all those are totally in control at the moment, but it is a rich feast.  I just finished listening to Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel's Man Booker prize-winning historical novel of Cromwell and More (recommended).  Another recent winner was The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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debbaker
Posts: 151
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

Wow Pepper, you've got me beat. I am reading The Forgotten Garden, Read Murders, Her Fearful Symmetry, and getting ready to start The Poisonwood Bible for LbW-next month. I have Wolf Hall on my Nook but haven't started it yet. Did you love it? I have read the first 12 chapters of The Poacher's Son. I am trying to keep myself in check for the schedule.

Deb
booknook516.blogspot.com

simplicity of character is the natural result of profound thought
william hazlitt
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debbaker
Posts: 151
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

Oh and I have been trying to find a Great Books group in the area. I may sign up for their Spring Institute in Philadelphia.

Deb
booknook516.blogspot.com

simplicity of character is the natural result of profound thought
william hazlitt
CAG
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CAG
Posts: 218
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

I finished "The Poacher's Son" and can only say what a great mystery. I was caught up in the story from the very beginning. I can't wait for the discussion to start.

CAG
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006

Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

So far, it's been a very good book, very engrossing and game wardens do have a lot to do! I've read 7 chapters so far and it's getting quite interesting. Thanks, Paul, for picking another great FL book.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

[ Edited ]

Deb -- I found the little Shared Inquiry Handbook from the Great Books Foundation quite interesting.  Mostly, it reinforced things I already knew from book club participation through the years, but even that was reassuring, and there was a tidbit or two that was either new or for which I had to articulate to what extent I agreed or disagreed.

 

Hope you find a group.  I had wanted to join one for a long time.  Some of the participants in this one have been doing this for years and apparently many of them worked through the basic books years ago, perhaps even several times!  It is a rather small group of nine, in our sixties and into eighties, so we all have a few years of developing our own worldviews under our belts.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

I have Wolf Hall on my Nook but haven't started it yet. Did you love it?

 

 

After so many years of book clubing, I think I developed an aversion to saying that I love a book, or even that I like a book.  Even pre-book club days, I had this basic attitude that if a book offers me one good idea that stays with me, it has been a worthwhile read (or partial read).  In that vain, some of the most valuable books I have read have been ones I probably would classify as "disliking" or even not particularly enjoying.

 

That said, I did enjoy listening to Wolf Hall.  Mantel paints a rich, detailed picture of the period and especially of the relationship between Cromwell and More.  I hope it is based on decent historical evidence, because it will be the picture I carry forward unless displaced by something I encounter later -- and, even then, that information is likely to be colored by Wolf Hall.  Mantel brings wry humor to her writing, probably more so in Place of Greater Safety (which I started but then needed to return to the library before I finished) than in Wolf Hall, but still lightening what could otherwise be a heavy subject. She imagines people so they rapidly become real, identifiable characters.  (She does the same with places, but I think her greater strength is with people, despite the place name title.)  Cromwell became a much more understandable person for me.

 

Our local Star Ledger said this:  "More than an outstanding character portrayal, Wolf Hall, winner of the 2009 Man Booker Prize, provides a fresh perspective on a period of history that too often is strip-mined for its entertainment value, with little regard for the complex political and social elements that shaped and propelled it."

 

Long way around response to say that I found Wolf Hall well worth the time it took to listen to all 18 CDs (23 hrs, and I frequently need to replay when listening to a book).  I  did it within the 14 days allowed for borrowing new books/CDs in our system.  I hope you will find the time you spend with WH worthwhile!  I think it is a book that lends itself to a leisurely pace of reading, i.e., the character development and the stories sustain the interest more than the plot, which one basically knows going into the book. (Since WH focuses on the Cromwell and More relationship, it does not cntinue through all of Cromwell's life.)

 


debbaker wrote:

Wow Pepper, you've got me beat. I am reading The Forgotten Garden, Read Murders, Her Fearful Symmetry, and getting ready to start The Poisonwood Bible for LbW-next month. I have Wolf Hall on my Nook but haven't started it yet. Did you love it? I have read the first 12 chapters of The Poacher's Son. I am trying to keep myself in check for the schedule.


 

PS -- I shall follow with interest the discussion of The Poisonwood Bible, but that is one book that I did rather dislike and I haven't convinced myself that I really want to re-read it right now.  I may use the month to catch up on or get to some others that have been waiting in the wings. 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pattycakeMN
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Dorian

My favorite books are usually TRUE CRIME - this book sounds every bit as intriguing - looking forward to the discussion !!

Patricia in Minnesota

Contributor
mariaev
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

Just received The Poacher's Son last week. Can't wait to start reading it!

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JoanieGranola
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎11-11-2009
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron


Peppermill wrote:

When I received miy copy, I couldn't get to it right away.  But when I did finally open it a few days ago, I was through six chapters before I was willing to put it aside for some of all the other reading that is in my currently reading stack (CRS).  I am looking forward to getting back to this and to the discussion here. 

 

Pepper

 

PS Besides TPS, my CSR is something like this:  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (LbW board), Beowulf (Epics Board),  Speaking of Faith (book group), Rapture Ready! (R&S board),  Annotated Alice (Classics board), Passage to India (to listen to), Great Books, Conversation Series 5 (GB group); workbook on the Beatitudes (Lent), and Seized by Max Hardberger (Current Affairs Sneak Peak -- great so far). Vanity Fair is still begging to be finished.  So, not sure all those are totally in control at the moment, but it is a rich feast.  I just finished listening to Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel's Man Booker prize-winning historical novel of Cromwell and More (recommended).  Another recent winner was The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson


 

I'm sort of in the same boat as you. I stopped reading only because I didn't want to finish too early and forget the book before the discussions start. In the meantime, I'm reading other books that aren't being discussed anywhere. Forgive me for asking, because I'm new to the whole "online book club" thing, but is there a discussion about The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo? I loved that book. The second one was even better.

CAG
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CAG
Posts: 218
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

 


JoanieGranola wrote:

Peppermill wrote:

When I received miy copy, I couldn't get to it right away.  But when I did finally open it a few days ago, I was through six chapters before I was willing to put it aside for some of all the other reading that is in my currently reading stack (CRS).  I am looking forward to getting back to this and to the discussion here. 

 

Pepper

 

PS Besides TPS, my CSR is something like this:  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (LbW board), Beowulf (Epics Board),  Speaking of Faith (book group), Rapture Ready! (R&S board),  Annotated Alice (Classics board), Passage to India (to listen to), Great Books, Conversation Series 5 (GB group); workbook on the Beatitudes (Lent), and Seized by Max Hardberger (Current Affairs Sneak Peak -- great so far). Vanity Fair is still begging to be finished.  So, not sure all those are totally in control at the moment, but it is a rich feast.  I just finished listening to Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel's Man Booker prize-winning historical novel of Cromwell and More (recommended).  Another recent winner was The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson


 

I'm sort of in the same boat as you. I stopped reading only because I didn't want to finish too early and forget the book before the discussions start. In the meantime, I'm reading other books that aren't being discussed anywhere. Forgive me for asking, because I'm new to the whole "online book club" thing, but is there a discussion about The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo? I loved that book. The second one was even better.


 

I also loved Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and also the second one. I haven't seen any discussion about either of his books but I am checking every so often. If you (or anyone) does see one, please let me know too. Thanks.

 

CAG
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

[ Edited ]

There is probably a discussion of Larsson's books somewhere on the web, but I haven't seen one on the B&N sites. 

 

Has anyone gotten their hands on the third book, not due in this country (U.S.) until late May?

 

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium Trilogy Series #1)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Girl Who Played with Fire (Millennium Trilogy Series #2) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest (Millennium Trilogy Series #3)

  

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

 


Peppermill wrote:

There is probably a discussion of Larsson's books somewhere on the web, but I haven't seen one on the B&N sites. 

 

Has anyone gotten their hands on the third book, not due in this country (U.S.) until late May?

 

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium Trilogy Series #1)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Girl Who Played with Fire (Millennium Trilogy Series #2) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest (Millennium Trilogy Series #3)

  

 


 

I just finished the 3rd book today. I'll wait for you all to read it before I chime in....

 

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,832
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

 


PaulH wrote:

 


Peppermill wrote:

There is probably a discussion of Larsson's books somewhere on the web, but I haven't seen one on the B&N sites. 

 

Has anyone gotten their hands on the third book, not due in this country (U.S.) until late May?

 

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium Trilogy Series #1)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Girl Who Played with Fire (Millennium Trilogy Series #2) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest (Millennium Trilogy Series #3)

  

 


 

I just finished the 3rd book today. I'll wait for you all to read it before I chime in....

 


 

I ordered mine from a UK store and read it late last year. It was the best one of the three. I just hope that one day his family will see fit to release the other works that have been completed and maybe hire someone else to finish what he didn't finish.

 

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VeraC
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

I just posted a message in the Community Room about the same topic!  My husband and I vacationed in Ireland last November and I picked up Stieg Larsson's last book there.  It was fantastic!  And tied up everything from the first two novels.  I read somewhere that he had been planning a 10-book series with these.  It's so sad that he passed away before he could write any more of them.  But what he gift he gave to the world with the three that he did get written...

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torbank6
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Re: About The Poacher's Son and Paul Doiron

[ Edited ]

THIS COMMENT HAS BEEN EDITED DUE TO SPOILERS. PLEASE DO NOT POST SPOILERS WITHOUT ALERTING OTHER PEOPLE TO THEM!

 

Being from Vermont, I enjoyed the descriptions of the places, outdoors and homes.

I enjoyed the book and wanted to keep reading to discover who the "real" killer was.

I would definitely buy another book by Paul Doiron. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to read his book. Millie Dunn