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tennisgirl3194
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?

Life for the locals is very hard. They have to work night and day just to survive. They're hard workers. Tourists are there to enjoy the scenery and relax. While Mike is sweating and hurting, they're laughing and having a good time.

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

When Sarah was only referred to every so often, I didn't really like her. Now that she and Mike have actually talked to each other during the story, I don't think she's as controlling as she was originally put out to be. She seems nice enough, but isn't sure what to do with her life and if Mike fits into her vision of the futue.

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librarysusie
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I agree that there is real love/caring between Sarah & Mike  I just still get the feeling that she still thinks he will change his mind and go to law school and I don't see that happening.

 

 

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SandyS
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

BookWoman718 wrote:

Just wanted to comment that I don't think Mike's mom taking calls from his dad means that she's still in love with him.   They married young and unformed and have a long history together.  She moved on from him and probably feels a little sorry for him, left in that life that has so little of everything she values:  material comforts, stability, education and opportunity for their son, 'respectability.'    She knows her leaving hurt him, and that he's never forgotten her.  He calls when he's drunk, and sad.   She talks to him to be kind and because, although he wasn't the husband she wanted, she once cared for him.  Note that SHE doesn't call HIM, she just takes his calls.   And she doesn't tell her husband because he would obviously prefer that she not be haunted in that way by a relationship that's over.  Why tell him?   He'd be concerned, and for no good reason.  She's been done with Jack for a long time;  there's no threat to her marriage if she's just kind to him.  She's happy where she is, and she doesn't tell anyone because the calls don't mean that much to her - it's a kindness she does for Jack. 

BookWoman718,

 

I agree with your thoughts.  She has two choices - hang up or listen.  I think due to his "history" she chooses to be kind.

 

SandyS

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Becktrek
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I am really enjoying everyone's discussions on this book.  Just wanted to say Thank You to everyone for contributing.  I am loving this experience.

 

Becky in IN

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SandyS
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

MamaGoose49 wrote:

I  enjoy getting to know the characters, and I wonder how much Charley will be playing a part later in the book

I have been thinking a lot about Charley Stevens.  Chapter 8, pg 66, "What I didn't tell the lieutenant was that Charley Stevens and my dad had a long history together, or that the retired pilot, more than anyone, was probably responsible for my joining the Warden Service.  It was a long story and a bad memory, especially under the circumstances."

 

I'm trying to pinpoint exactly what Charley did that was responsible for Mike becoming a Warden.  Does it relate to when he was a young man (Chapter 18) visiting his dad at camp?

 

SandyS

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librarysusie
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Yes Sandy I think that night at the camp changed everything for Mike and earned a respect for Charley that night and saw his dad in a light that wasn't flattering.

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nickntom
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

 

nymazz wrote:

JuneC wrote:

 

 

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?

 

As in many touristy towns, I feel a love /hate relationship develops.  The locals need the tourists to bump up the economy, yet they may feel their lives are being infringed upon. Perhaps like houseguests that overstay their welcome.

Who doesn't breath a sigh of relief when the door closes?

Yeah, I never realized I had so many close relatives until I moved to Florida. haha.. 

 

 

 

 

How True!

 

:smileyvery-happy:

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StewiesMom
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

 

I don't know what I think about the industry takeover being central to the story.  It seems like any industry could have been substituted - a bigger business taking over another business.  So far, I've read many opinions that blame the Wendigo Company for the deal that the company struck with the AP&P.  However, the AP&P did sell it's land to Wendigo.  Although it affects the local businesses and homesteaders, the Wendigo company IS a business and they exist to grow and remain profitable.  The residents are the real losers in this takeover.  It seems as though many of the local citizens could have plenty of reason to take matters a little too far.  I am highly suspicious of Officer Twombley.  He seems to have a grudge against Mike's dad that goes beyond the episode Mike relates from 2 years prior.  I found his behavior on the ride home with Mike even more extreme than was believable for an officer to exhibit.  It seemed like a "Hollywood Loose Cannon" type of character, not a realistic portrayal of an officer in a small town.

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

Anthony Desalle has got the biggest attitude between the to men.  I felt that Mike was completely justified in his interactions with Mr. Desalle.  Mr. Desalle had absolutely no regard for the well-being of his child.  The missing registration stickers were just an excuse to cite him for this disregard.  I think Mike felt empathy for this poor little boy who was obviously verbally belittled on a regular basis.  I think Mike may have subconsciously wanted to get revenge on this man for the treatment he, himself, received as a child at the hands of his father.  In a professional situation, Mike is perfectly capable at communicating.  However, personally, I don't think Mike really knows how to communicate with others.  I'm not even sure he wants to communicate with others.  He seems perfectly happy being alone.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

 

I was under the impression that she was his estranged wife, but, anyways...  Se has been described as a direct and slight nosy person.  I think she is those things, but it is obvious that she also has unresolved feeling for Mike and still loves him, even though she and he are both aware that they were not meant to be together.  I think she genuinely wanted to check on Mike and provide comfort, if she could.  The physical relationship they revisited was neither his, nor her, fault.  Sometimes things happen between people who share a history, whether they intend for them to happen or not.

 

"Tact, my dear"..."is merely a ploy of the unimaginative." - Bernard in Corinne Demas' "The Writing Circle"
"My life is my own, and the opinions of others don't interest me..." — Carroll John Daly**
**This is not necessarily true, I just love the quote!**
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CathyB
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story?

It is very central as it will aaffect many people ... jobs, omes, etc....

Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?
Not sure in my head yet.

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?
Well, of course, the locals serve the tourists. There are the obvious class distinctions
fo those who have money and those who don't. They stick to their own. Does Mike fit in?

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?
It is Mike's job to question and seek answers. He is right. No, Mike seems to be a lousy communicator all around.  More so with people he is close to.

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

Only that she is still in love with him.

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

she and Mike have a distant relationship. Other than that, not much.

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librarysusie
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

[ Edited ]

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?

I think Mike feels like he is is a local but do the  locals accept him as such?

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rosia408
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I think that the takeover of the logging company is very central to the story. The local people are living with the fear of losing their homes and livlihood.

 

As far as the locals vs the tourists,  I live in a community that is heavily dependent on tourism. It is a kind of love/hate relationship. We need the tourists and yet resent their snotty attitudes at times. Not sure really how Mike fits in. I don't think Mike is really sure how he fits in anywhere in life. He knows he doesn't want to be like his father  and yet he is drawn to his father and his father's lifestyle. He puts everything he supposedly holds dear to protect and defend his father. I think Mike is still searching for himself.

 

Not sure in Mike and DeSalle's encounters who has the bigger attitude. They both seem to have them and both I am thinking feel they are justified. Mike has the law on his side, but I think that both are just trying to protect what is theirs. Neither one is really a good communicator, although Mike is certainly more polite about it.

 

I don't think that Sarah really wants Mike to be the financial success that Mike thinks she does. Just my opinion here. I get the feeling that they have some communication problems and that MIke has just shut her out. It's the shutting out that she had difficulties with.

 

 

Mike's mother had the unfortunate experience of hooking up with an alcoholic. That marriage was doomed from the "I do" She got out and that was a good thing. I think that there is a part of her that still cares for her ex. but she has moved on.

 

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Rebz
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

The taking over by the logging company is directly affecting the lives of the locals....they are taking over their lives and taking away everything that these people have come to love.

 

The wilderness is life for the locals, for the tourists, however, its something temporary, to be used for a week, or a weekend, at a time and then leave to go back to the hustle and bustle of city life. Mike is 100% the passionate local

 

Anthony Desalle definitely has the bigger attitude and I do belive that Mike is right...but he MIGHT have been a little less harsh and scary almost.  There are times you just need to back down.

-Becca
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Ronrose
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I think in Mike's scenes with Anthony DeSalle they are both pushing the limits. I think Mike sees a lot of himself in DeSalles little boy. The child is obviously in awe of and in large part in fear of his dad. It is very like Mike's childhood. Mike wanted to love and respect his father, but he also felt afraid of him and deep down may have mistrusted him for the way he treated Mike and his mother. These memories coupled with the current stress of his dad being in trouble find  an outlet  when confronted with the hardheaded attitude of Desalle.

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kstempien
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I completely agree!! When I read through this section, and even after, I kind of felt that any one of the characters could be a suspect at any given time. Just when I started thinking I had the story figured out, with who the muderer was, the author would throw a wrench into the mix by making another character seem like he or she could possibly be it instead....all the way up to the end!! I can't explain how much I like this approach, as I have read plenty of books in the past where, once you figured it out, the story was pretty much over because nothing really changed after that. (PS-Thanks Paul!! :smileyhappy: )

 

 

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fordmg
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Marcella87 wrote:

 

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

I was on Mikes side when he first confronted Desalle. He was simply doing his job, checking for proper registration and safety equipment. Desalle is a pompous jerk for feeling so inconvenienced by following the law. I also think Mike's concern for the welfare of the child is rooted in his own childhood. He remembers the need of approval from his father when they went poaching together. He sees in Desalle the same irresponsibility Jack showed for a childs welfare. 

 

I found myself irritated with Mike when he went looking for a fight and confronted Desalle again. He was using the boys welfare as an excuse to exert power. He feels like his life is spiraling out of control and by issuing a ticket he can regain a sliver of power. 

 

 

I

I guess I don't understand why most people are upset with Mike checking out DeSalle again.  I am more upset that after making a formal complaint, DeSalle still is not following the rules.  Does he believe they don't apply to him?  DeSalle jeopardizes a person's job with a formal complaint, and then breaks the rules again - this is the ultimate snub to the warden agency. 

 

MG 

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MsReaderCP
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

The takeover of the logging seems central.  Of course this is a mystery full of red herrings and it either is central or someone wanted everyone to think it was central and therefore committed the murder right after the meeting.  However the problem with that is then what  motive would someone have to kill Wendigo spokesman, Shipman.  because of the number of people who live and work on the land,this gives a number of suspects, including  mentally deficient squatters, Wallace Bickford, and nice retired wardens, Charley Stevens. 

 

Mike is not in the right in his treatment of Anthony Desalle. Of course he needs to make sure rules are followed, and a kid is thrown in for good measure!!  But also these are tourists that he should respectfully encourage following the law , a way that might even make the child look up and see that there adults who can enforce rules without threatening and showing who  can be scarier.  Mike was obviously taking out a lot of his frustrations on Desalle.  Even if Desalle wasn't following the laws, he went about his job in the wrong way and worse - set a terrible example for an eyes -wide open child.

 

My impression of Sarah is that Mike has made her hatred of everything middle class worse in his head than it really is - probably based on his mother.  But his mother was married and had not known Mike's father as long as Sarah has known Mike. Yes, people should learn from past experiences, but people should also communicate.  He is making Sarah's decisions for her, giving her no chance to say if she would like to stay with him, if she loves him and respects him as a game warden.  Can she live with the long hours he might be gone called out in the middle of the night when a bear is terrorizing the inhabitants?  Can she live with country life, no mall around the corner?  Will she begin to resent him if she does not pursue any dreams she might have in the city.  these are things she probably has had some time to think about while they have been apart.  he has realized how much he misses her.  He should be telling her that.

 

Taking out our anger on others, refusing to allow ourselves to be vulnerable and communicate with the one we love, feeling that the land we live on is ours, even a part of us, that no one should be able to take away..These are deep feelings within us, inherited as part of being an American, a human..It's how we all deal with these things that make us human, that make us, us, or in this instance Mike Bowditch. 

 

 

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nymazz
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

 

 

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

The takeover is very central to the general atmosphere of the story.  Its obvious that many people are being affected in a negative way, losing the homes they have lived in almost all their lives. It would make you wonder if any of those people were possible suspects, they would have motive.

 

 

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

I think Desalle has the bigger attitude, but he seemed to be able to push Mikes buttons pretty quick. I think a lot of it had to due with the way Desalle treated his son.  I think that bothered Mike, possibly projecting his own relationship with his father into the situation.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

I think she loves Mike, but the lonely life of a wardens wife doesn't seem to be what she

wants for her future.  She loves Mike, but won't settle for that life style.

 

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

I think Sarah and Mike's mother are similar in that neither one wanted to live the life of

a wardens wife.  Mike's mom seems a bit materialistic and the fact that she still has a connection to Jack is surprising, she still has feelings for him.  Its hard to imagine why.

 

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are. -Mason Cooley-
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pen21
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I agree with you fordmg. Mike was doing his job. One complaint should not make a warden incapable of doing his job. I think DeSalle thinks he is above the law. His complaint has no merit and if they checked it out would not be valid. The second confrontation with DeSalle, Mike had witnesses as to what happened.

pen21

 

 

fordmg wrote:
I

I guess I don't understand why most people are upset with Mike checking out DeSalle again.  I am more upset that after making a formal complaint, DeSalle still is not following the rules.  Does he believe they don't apply to him?  DeSalle jeopardizes a person's job with a formal complaint, and then breaks the rules again - this is the ultimate snub to the warden agency. 

 

MG 

 

 

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GadgetgirlKS
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right?

 

Good questions! I think Mike has a big attitude, but he is doing his job and not having enough life jackets could result in a child getting hurt, so I am glad he has a big attitude and is looking out for this kid. Anthony has a scary big attitude that makes me think he is up to something bad.

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jb70
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Peppermill wrote:

Let's see now, Mike and Sarah were together for four years, starting when Mike was nineteen or twenty, given that he is now twenty-four?

 

(Lost this message the first time.)

 

They are really young so some of their communication problems probably stem from that.  This could very well be their first grown-up relationship and they are still working on it.  I forsee them finding some kind of reconciliation but it could just be me hoping for something happy to come out of this.  (I always hope for and, to a certain extent expect, the best so I think there is a chance they will work things out.)

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