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Zia01
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

 

Zeal wrote:

 

Zia01 wrote:

I don't know that I like Sarah, she actually reminds me a bit of his mother. Mike's all perfect as long as he wants more, achieves more. Otherwise he's not worth it.

 

This is an interesting comparison...one that I never would have considered, but I can see why you connect Sarah and Mike's mother.  Maybe if we knew Sarah in a little more depth, like we do Mike, it would be even clearer.

 

 

Ya, I'm hoping we get to know her a little better futher on. I would like to be wrong about her though.

 

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meme1
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I'm commenting before I've read other readers' posts, so I'm sure I will repeat ideas that others have shared.  Through Mike we see an attitude about out-of-staters coming into an area.  In this case it's the speeding, gas-drinking SUV pulling a huge speedboat with "city folks" doing the driving.  (Are we as the reader seeing the author's attitude?)  Yes, I think Mike has an attitude, but he is also doing his job when he asks for the paper work and life jackets.  (As an aside - I live on the shore of a lake. and it is rare to see children wearing life jackets as they float by in a boat.  Um, I think my attitude is showing through here!)  The city fellows also exhibit an enormous attitude:  we can do what we want because we are so much more important than the lowlife who try to enforce the law or the rustic people who dwell in this area.

 

The logging issue has a major impact on the people who live here.  Will people go to any means to keep things as they've been?  I'm speculating that that is what is happening.

 

I don't think that Mike's father is guilty of the murders.  I suspect Pelliter and another fellow.  But Jack makes a convenient scapegoat because of his past behavior.

 

This story has captivated me!  Thanks to the author and the selection person/people.

 

 

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

 

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

 

 

meme

~~ Just when the caterpillar thought the world was over, it became a butterfly.

~~ Be careful reading health books. You may die of a misprint. Mark Twain
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lyssadesilvio
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Anthony DeSalle and Mike definitely both have attitude problems. I believe the only reason Mike is being so hard because his job is the only thing he is in control of right now (which he doesn't even have control over that anymore, being told to take vacation time). Sarah and Mike's mother are similar in aspects. This life is what both Jack and Mike chose, and they chose to not stay.

Mike became a game warden, which is actually the total opposite of what his father is. And in fact, the more the story goes on, the more we find out that Mike and Jack are really not that different at all. They both are loners, and both of the women in their lives left them because of it.

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Krickett2432
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

 

The takeover of the logging is central to the mystery because it is the cause of the mystery.  This story would not take place without the takeover.  Local politics would play a huge role in the lives of the residents. It seems they live with a "small town" mentality.  Everyone knows everyone else.  They are all affected in some way by the takeover, and they are not happy about it.  In this way, I believe they have banded together because of a common enemy.  There could be a variety of suspects other than Mike's father.  They all seem to be gun owners and very protective of their properties.  No doubt there will be multiple suspects as the story moves along.

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lovetoreadLW
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

I think they both have bad attitudes, but we get to see where Mike's attitude is coming from. Desalle made a complaint against him and Mike is already angry about his whole situation--father wanted for murder, girlfriend left him, career on the line. We don't know why Desalle is a jerk or why he treats his son badly.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

 

She's not ready to give up on their relationship, but I think her patience is wearing thin.

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

 

She wanted a better life for herself and her son. I believe she loved, maybe still loves, Mike's father, but was done with the hard living.

 

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carol_fa
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

The takeover seems to be what this is all about, the logging is what these people do - I am wondering if the people in charge are really setting up Mike's father to get some of the pressure off of them and their agenda.

Life for the locals is a very simple life, I am not sure Mike would fit in anywhere. He needs to let go of his troubled childhood and get on with life.

I think Anthony Desalle is a very angry man and has a horrible attitude. Mike seems to be a lot more calm than Anthony. I think Anthony's relationship with his son reminds Mike of his own father and it really bothers him. Mike truly believes he is in the right and Mr. Desalle is breaking the law.

I think Mike communicates in a different way with people he's close to than Anthony does - Mike has a much more relaxed attitude, but not the best communicator.

Sara is obviously still in love with Mike, however, she knows she will never get a full committment from him.

So far, Mike's mom seems to be very self centered and concerned what people will think about her. Looking forward to reading more about her.

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sarah_in_ca
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

The logging takeover is distant in that not much of the land has been altered physically, yet.  There's a lot of  talk, people visiting the area with plans, and the changes are being spread to the locals.  In that sense, the logging takeover is quite central to local politics and the people who will be displaced.

 

Tourists have a great time on their vacations, camping, boating, hiking, checking out the local charm.  Most locals work hard every day and don't get a chance to enjoy the things the tourists do--they provide the services for the tourists.  Mike represents the law and tries to keep everyone safe while they're enjoying their stay in Maine.  He's a go between between the locals and the tourists, all the while protecting the forests and the inhabitants of the forest.

 

Mike's mother has little personality.  She got out, away from Mike's dad and has begun a new life.  I think she was badly treated by Jack.

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Sheltiemama
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

The takeover of the logging is gaining in importance. Local politics impact people's lives more than anything done nationally. I do have some other possible suspects, and one of them's the officer who arrested Mike's dad.

 

Mike is kind of between the tourists and the locals. He had a comfortable life with his mother and stepfather, but he had an impoverished childhood before that.

 

Desalle has the bigger attitude the first time, but I'd say they're about even the second. And no, Mike's strong suit is not communication.

 

Sarah wants him to be a lawyer, not a warden. She seems more upwardly mobile. But she obviously did miss him and was worried about him.

 

Mike's mother is complicated. On the one hand, she doesn't want her friends and neighbors to know about her past. But on the other hand, she doesn't think Mike's father killed those two men. She still has a soft spot for him and seems to understand him better than anyone.

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DfiggZ
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Mike's Mom

I don't have any real feelings for her. She seemed OK but I don't really consider her a vidal character. I think that Paul did a great job as putting her in and for the right amount of time.

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Mainelady
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

 

It appears that this issue is driving a lot of emotion for people who may feel powerless to do anything about the upcoming loss of not only their livelihood but their life as they know it.  They feel they will be forced to move and to give up homes, be separated from friends, and find a way to support themselves when they have little other skills, training, or experience.  Basically they are scared, and and this point in the story, there are probably several who could be suspects.

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

Mike is young, and as we have seen, has as his authority figure an absent father whose way is communicating is less than optimal.  He reacts to Desalle 'by the book', trying to keep his emotions about the son tightly wrapped.  He is not going to let anybody tell him how to do his job, and he is going to prove he can be the best.  Desalle isn't playing by the rules, so he is going to suffer and Mike is determined to teach him who's boss.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

 

At this point, I don't have much impression of Sarah--I would like her to encourage Mike to talk more about his feelings and his ambitions and goals, just as I would like her to do the same.  At this point, their communications seem to be in a negative mode: "I DON"T want to do this or DON'T want to be that"....until they can start dreaming and planning together, and reconcile their individual hopes for the future, I'm not sure they're going to be able to have a future.

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

 

In one sense, I admire Mike's mother for not allowing herself to become trapped in an abusive relationship, and for getting herself and Mike into a situation where they can have a better life.  She also never tries to keep Mike from seeing his father, or staying connected.  That said....I think she is too focused on "stuff" on "things" and that may be a reflection on her upbringing.  I have an impression of her as almost a Scarlett O'Hara ("I'll never be hungry again.") and I'm not at all impressed with the bozo lawyer she's currently married to. 

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debbaker
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

At this point the takeover of the logging seems to me to be always in the background. It keeps coming up and people comment on the takeover but it hasn't played the central role as yet. I think the role of the takeover is understated at this time. Hard to gage the political arena at this time. The people are concerned with the parts of politics that immediately affects their lives. The issues of land development and hunting/fishing.

 

Tourists usually only see the beauty of an area, only have a superficial attachment. The natives to an area have much more invested. It is often hard to appreciate the beauty of an area that you dwell in everyday. It sometimes becomes the mundane. Mike seems to be one of those individuals who lives in between both of these factors. He lives and works here but he is not from here.

 

I think that Mike sees himself and his father in DeSalle. They both have attitude here. DeSalle's is more obvious and obnoxious while Mike's is more subtle. I don't think he is conciously aware of his attitude towards this man. Mike seems to be using his job to show dominance over DeSalle. Mike is not very good at communicating well with anyone at this point.

 

Now that we have actually met Sarah, I think that Mike is more of the problem in this relationship. He is using his mother and father's relationship to put up a barrier against Sarah. He doesn't really give her much of a chance. He uses excuses to push her away and projects his insecurities onto her.

 

His mother is sad. She moved on with her life to have a more stable environment but still loves Mike's father in some way. She is a little deeper than we were led to believe in the early chapters. I have to say I wasn't impressed with the stepfather at all.

Deb
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simplicity of character is the natural result of profound thought
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debbaker
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I forgot to list my suspects: Tripp, Pelletier, maybe even Twonbley the stupid police officer-well maybe he is to self absorbed and hot headed for something like this.

Deb
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simplicity of character is the natural result of profound thought
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debbaker
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

(At this point the takeover of the logging seems to me to be always in the background. It keeps coming up and people comment on the takeover but it hasn't played the central role as yet) Let me clarify this: The takeover is the catalyst for much of the action - which makes it central to the story-however it hasn't taken over the story as yet. I don't find it the central essence of the story. As some have commented the story doesn't necessarily feel completely like a mystery at this time. There is so much more of the element of a coming of age story that it somehow down plays the mystery and its motives for me at this time. As we move more into the mystery elements I think the takeover is central to that part of the story.

 

 

Deb
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simplicity of character is the natural result of profound thought
william hazlitt
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hookedonbooks09
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I have to say that I feel the relationship with Mike and his dad is a bit unbelievable, for me.  Specifically the part where he is 16 and goes to spend the summer with his dad at the camp. 

 

He is a real trooper, as far as I'm concerned.  It was more like doing time than spending time with his father. 

 

Maybe he was trying to prove to himself one way or the other what his dad was all about and trying one last time to please him.  But it seems there were no good times shared on this visit.

 

I have not finished the book, so consider this comment for what it's worth at this point in the story.

 

Barb

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CharlieG31
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I also agree with you and with all the ones that consider that the takeover of the logging is central , from my point of view what the author is trying to achieve in this plotline is to create a type of distraction or maybe the background of the story so that when the time comes the readers get the chance to comprehend everything in a far more logical way than just a formal way , with a very well established background from my point of view the story will become more juicier with a established background which is what we are reading now with all the flashbacks about Mike's life and his father , but what I can infer is that all of a sudden we will find a LOT about the logging and the company and we will be like ohhhh why didnt I see that before lol.

 

 

AnnahE wrote "I think that the takeover of the logging is central to this story.  The locals are losing land and being displaced and that would make anyone angry. They have a love/hate relationship with the tourists.  The locals need their money, yet they hate the fact that they need their money. I think that Mike and his mother will never have a close relationship.  She is more concerned with her new marriage and the security that it brings her, than mending the relationship with Mike.  I have a niggling feelng in the back of my mind that Mike's dad is really guilty.  I don't know why I think that, I just do.  I can't wait to read the rest to see the outcome."

 

 

"The questions are more essential than the answers."
Karl Theodor Jaspers

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Benz1966
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

 

It's pretty obvious that the takeover of the logging is a vital part of the story. Some pieces are fitting together already and motive seems pretty clear.

 

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?

 

I see him definitely as a local.  The tourists all seem to live in their own little world and at times it feels as if he rolls his eyes at him.


In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

I think the attitude question is split 50/50.  Mike seems to be deliberately seeking out confrontation to deal with the issues he's having with his father.  While he technically is in the right he should be passing over the issues to someone else not directly involved.  And no, he's not doing any better at personal communication.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

 

I don't have much of an impression of her other than I think she still cares very deeply for Mike and is very capable of being hurt by him.

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

 

I think that if Mike and Sarah were to marry and split, Sarah would turn out to be just like Mike's mother (and her relationship with Mike's father) with regard to their relationship.  

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kherbrand
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

 

The logging seems distant at this point, I think. As for politics, it seems like the people live so far apart from each other, and aren't that well off that maybe politics doesn't play much of a role - either that or the ones who do have the money control the politics

 

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?

Locals seem poorer - and have to work hard.  Tourists come for the boating, fishing, etc - so they are a "class" above.  Mike seems more like a local - he is really more of a loner - doesn't really seem to have any friends other than his boss.

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

I'm not sure who has the bigger attitude. I think Anthony was ticked immediately when he saw Mike (because I am sure he knew that he didn't have his ducks in a row..)  But then I feel like Mike was "picking on him"  just because he could, as a way to let his own anger out.  He kept mentioning the son so I wondered if at one point he hadn't felt like the son with his own dad.  That could be why he was harassing Anthony because he was letting out the aggression he had carried around towards his father since he was a boy.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?  I get the impression that Sarah still love's Mike - but needs him to grow up - needs him to accept some responsibility - she is trying to give him the chance, but again - he is just going to sit there and let life "happen"

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?  Someone who married young - maybe trying to get out of a bad home life, but then realized she hadn't escaped at all - so finally makes a break for it and gets the life she wants. 

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Kauai-Guy
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Mike's Mom: I think she likes a rugged man but wants the finer things in life too. Comfort is important to her and wins out every time.

 

Sarah: Similar to Mike's mom. She very attracted to Mike but not to his lifestyle.

 

Local Politics/Takeover/Possible Suspects: It feels like it's still part of the central mystery to me. The only other possible connection may have something to do with the POW. No suspects yet.

 

DeSalle: I think Mike's doing his job and not harrassing DeSalle. He's concerned about the boy too. I think he sees himself in the kid (remembering how he felt as a young man trying to protect his dad but also wanting to help Charley).

 

My book blog is Books Are Like Candy Corn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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bookowlie
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

[ Edited ]

Good points.  I agree that Mike keeps a distance from people, so doesn't really fit in with either the tourists or the locals.  I think this is the result of his bad childhood and having poor role models.

 

** Edited to add:  Sorry, pressed "Post" key too quickly!  This post is in reply to MeandMoose's 3/8 post. 

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bookowlie
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

The takeover of the logging seems to be a central part of the story.  It's an important issue in the lives of the locals  It will affect many of their jobs.  Other possible suspects are Jack's employer, although he seems too obvious a suspect for it to be him.  I still have a feeling that Jack will be turn out to be the killer.  Sometimes a duck is just a duck.

 

As someone who lived in a resort town many years ago, I find there is a big disconnect between the tourists and the locals.  The locals are resentful of the tourists, who are usually affluent and rent nice homes.  New Englanders in general are a bit unfriendly toward "outsiders", even people that are from another town in the same state.  Mike doesn't seem to fit in with either the locals or the tourists.  He is a loner and seems to view both groups from a distance.