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CharminKB
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

The takeover of the logging seems to be the focal point in this drama.  The police seem to think it is the cause of violence and it is an incident that is effecting many of the people living in the area - - including Mike's father. 

This story is so well written I am beginning to suspect everyone!  Mike's father is the suspect - but nothing about his arrest makes sense...but if he's being framed..why??  I have even scratched my head and wondered about some of the law enforcement...

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 I don't consider Mike having an attitude--just a really, really bad day!  Desalle and others like him think they are put on this earth to prove just how "bad" they are.  Grow up!  Kudos to Mike for showing him that he's 1) not intimidated by him and 2) that regardless of how he sees himself (Desalle) - in actuality he's no different from anyone else and must abide by the same rules and structures we all do.  Ok, so maybe Mike did take some frustrations out on him--no harm done...I just feel bad for the kid!

 

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

I don't think I've spent enough time with this character to develop a fair opinion of her.  I immediately didn't care for her husband, but she's still a grey area for me.

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Zia01
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider? Well it seems it will have a significant role in the book but other than them kicking people off the land, I'm not sure what it will be yet.

 

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to? Anthony is a first class jerk who treat his son like crap. Mike on the other hand has a pretty big chip on his shoulder it seems. I do think Mike is harassing Anthony a bit but every time Mike has talked to him, he finds something Anthony is doing wrong.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah? Not yet really. I think she misses him though but is struggling with what she wants in life.

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?  I think a part of her still cares for Jack and understands him but the other part wanted the life she choose. I don't have much of an impression just yet.

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JaneM
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

EMILY7W wrote:

I had a hard time putting the book down after chapter 18. It's getting interesting.
The more we learn about Mike's father, the more repulsive he becomes and we're reminded of Mike's ability to overlook or be in denial of what kind of person his father really is.
I think his mother still has a love for his father. He was her husband and father of her child and though she loved him, decided she could no longer put herself and son through living with him. And because of this love for him, she chose to keep his phone calls a secret from her husband.
Mike's confronting Desalle, I think was to mess with him some more as well as looking out for the little boy. They both have big attitudes and it seems Mike's not really "close" to anyone, but could work on his communication skills, especially with Sarah.(And I thought the nipple part in the sex scene was a little too much info., though I have to give Paul Doiron props for making me feel like I was there. haha)

-Emily

I can't figure out how to modify the quote to be just the part I want to comment about!  Anyway, I agree with the last line of Emily's post in that I though the sex scene was too gratuitous and didn't really add anything significant to the character or story development.

Jane M.
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LindaEducation
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I didnt like DeSalle's arrogant attitude right away, and think he has a bigger attitude than Mike does.  Allthough when Mike has contact with him the second time when he is not supposed to makes Mike look bad too.  I cant say I totally blame Mike though. I think the way DeSalle treated his son really bothers Mike, and maybe makes him flashback to his own childhood when his Dad was not a very good father to him. 

 

I dont have much of an opinion on the Mom although she appears to worry about what others think too much.  I think in some small way she still carries a little torch for Mike's father.

You know you've read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend. -- Paul Sweeney
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skrupp
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

To some degree I feel the takeover plays a central role--obviously due to the stress placed on the locals that this change will effect.  And in other ways I feel it plays a back role--meaning it is not the main focus of the main character Mike.

 

The more Mike "lets us in" on his history, I'm sure anyone of his dad's "friends" could have been involved.

 

So what is up with the Mike and Desalle interactions.  the first one starts out with a normal interaction, but it quickly changed as Desalle became more outspoken.  Even though Mike could tell it was effecting the son he didn't back down.  The second time--what was Mike thinking?  It was more like he was looking for a fight or something.  As far as attitude,  while Desalle's seems bigger, part of me feels that Mike's attitude is the bigger one and needs to come down a few notches. 

 

I don't feel that Mike is any better at talking the people around him as he is in communicating with the tourists.  Is this because he is still trying to feel a part of the community?  Not sure.  He is more comfortable talking to the locals but even talking with his boss he doesn't seem to be able to express himself the way he needs to.

 

Mike's mom comes across to me as someone who was in a bad situation and wasn't sure the best way to get out of it.  I think she loves Mike and even Mike's father in her own way she just may struggle to express it in a way that is clear to Mike.

 

Sarah I think still cares for Mike but she is not sure how she would fit into his world.  And heaven knows Mike does little to help her there.

 

But, what's with the dad!  Mike's memories of his father in these chapters leave little to recommend him to anyone.  Taking a sick child out to check the traps?  Come on!  And his poaching of the deer during the summer and expecting his son to cover up?  Not to mention the whole attitude during the summer visit.  I mean nice bed, nice pick-up at the station, etc.  I'm beginning to dislike the dad the more I read.  Glad the mom took Mike away from that.

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kstempien
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

      I think that the taking over of the logging company is very essential, atleast in this point in time, to the story. With what we know thus far, I think it is safe to say that, by the land being sold and taken over, there will be many changes for many people. For instance, residents who are currently considered to be 'squatting' will no longer be able to do so and will be forced to find somewhere else. Not only that, but for those who have grown accustomed to living life how they have been, it's only understandle how they would be reluctant to see any type of changes made or brought in. For those who feel so strongly, as I'm sure many of them would, it comes without saying that any of them could develop some sort of motive for becoming involved in the murder.

 

 

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?

        As with any type of tourist area, there are apparent differences between those who live there year-round and those only visiting for a period of time (irregardless of how short a stay it may be). Coming in from out of town, I think tourists rely on the local folks to make their visit a success, in one way or another. Although they are there for their own reasons, tourists rely on the hospitality of the locals to have a successful trip. Places to stay, shop, eat, etc, as well as known attractions, etc. all become the responsibility of the year-round locals to promote.

 

        I think Mike seems to be coming along. He has his ways, due to his upbringing and general wasy of life, but that's understandable. He's got some shortcomings, as does every individual, but I'm sure he will develop successfully as the story goes on!

 

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

        I think Mike and Mr. DeSalle have met their match when they first met, as far as attitude goes. Because the first interaction was not a pleasing experience, I'm wondering if there will be more of Mr. DeSalle throughout the rest of the story. The description of the son's reaction has me belieiving there is more to come! Both characters have definitely got their share of needing an adjustment in attitude. I feel as though Bowditch is in the right during their first encounter; he's only doing his job properly, as far as the registration and pfd situation goes. At that point, I don't feel that he deserves the lip service he was getting from DeSalle. As far as the other encounter, I kind of feel like Mike may now be looking to intentionally antagonize him at this point. Just because there was a poor interaction initially, I think Mike may be looking at that as his opportunity to continue, trying to make DeSalle look like the bad guy

 

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

         I'm not sure what I think about Sarah at this point. Knowing that she left him, most likely his love of taking the job so seriously being a big impact on her reason, I'm wondering how willing she is to work in the relationship. Was she willing to give and take to make it work, or was she the type of woman who had to have the relationship revolve completely around her? Initially, I thought it was great that she was concerned about the situation with Jack. I thought it was wrong that Mike just blew her off when she tried contacting him. However, I must agree with some of the other readers in that, when she arrived, her attitude was a little off. She entered, portraying that Mike 'needed' her because of what he was going through. I think I would be liking her a little more if she came in with an 'I' can help him attitude! Either way, I admit that I'm wondering what their relationship will be like in the end!

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

         I'm going to be honest and say that I'm not really a big fan of his mom right now! Maybe this will change throughout the story, but as for now, she really hasn't won any points with me. I'm gglad she is being portrayed this way, as it helps me understand Mike more, but I don't see her as a genuine person. She married Jack and began living the 'white trash' lifestyle. She eventually got her senses together and moved on, making a better life for herself. However, she now thinks she's too good to be associated with her past life. It's not always pleasant to remember times  that were less fortunate, but it's reality! She comes out and admits that Jack has contacted her, yet she's keeping this a secret from her current husband? She's basically ashamed of the life she had prior to 'finding better' and is so superficial as to be worried about what others will think of her. Since this is my sense of character for her, I can truly see why Mike and her aren't really that close either!

 

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EmmasGrandma
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Although I think that the acquistion by the logging company could very well play into the murders, I agree with a previous post in thinking that it does not have anything to actually do with the murders.  I think the meeting was used as a means to an end.  I'm not sure that the men murdered were actually the targets.

As far as Mike's attitude toward DeSalle, I feel that he sees his father in DeSalle and is frustrated by his disregard for the law and the safety of his son.  He has felt that disregard personally from his own father.  He seems to go over the top alittle in pushing DeSalle, as if he wants to push him into doing something so he can arrest him.  DeSalle's attitude would have the same effect on me, though, as he seems to be a real jerk. 

I have mixed feelings about Sarah and Mike's relationship.  I think that he feels the need to sabotage the relationship because of his fear of her expectations.  It appears that he has felt the relationship was doomed from the first - that his expectations have never been what hers were.  I felt her being at the house when he got there indicated that she does still care about him.  What happened was pretty predictable.  I have hopes that they will work something out.  He may have blown that chance though in sending her off the way he did.

I believe that Mike's mother married his father thinking that he would grow up and be a responsible, "normal" adult.  She had no idea what the war would do to him.  I think she tried to make it work, and I can't really blame her for not wanting to live as "trailer trash".  That she wanted a better life for her and son is natural and marrying a tax lawyer was as far from where she'd been as she could get.  It surprised me some that she maintained communication with Jack, but not so much that she still cared for him.  I think she realized that the man she first loved was still part of the "monster" he had become.

I'm having a very difficult time not reading ahead.  Paul, you have done an excellent job with keeping us suspended!  I'm looking forward to the next set of chapters.

 

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EiLvReedn
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Logging just seems to be a side subject for most of the story so far. I thought the book was more about what could be done in the woods, hunting, fishing, etc. The fish camps. You don't realize that the camps don't belong to the people running them or that the forest/logging isn't the locals own land.

When Mike encounters Anthony Desalle the first time, I thought he was right. The city people just come and do as they please and don't think they have to follow rules. Plus I think Mike might have commiserated w/ Desalle's son. The second time he encounters Desalle Mike has a chip on his shoulder and definitely was egging him on. He knew it was wrong but the anger was so built up Desalle was a good target.

I thought Mike's ex girl friend seemed selfish and spoiled. If Mike's love was nature and being a game warden and she really cared for him she would find a way to work it out instead of worrying about money. Some people just aren't cut out for the life Mike wanted to lead and Sarah seemed like one of those.

Mike's Mother seems really shallow to me. She seems to care more about what people will think than what is good for Mike or even try to understand how he feels. Maybe some of that came from being so poor and worrying about where food would come from when she was with Mike's dad but at this point I really don't like her any better than Mike's Dad.

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Zyna
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

I think that Mike's first interaction with Anthony DeSalle was rather entertaining. The guy did not have the proper registration for his boat and blew a fuse when Mike called him on it, though the 24-year-old Game Warden was only doing his job. His attitude was horrendous and it makes me wonder if he would act the same way if a cop pulled him over for speeding. Or perhaps he has such an attitude because he thinks the Game Warden Service is a joke?

 

Regardless, I think Mike's second confrontation was a huge mistake on Mike's part. In that instance, he is completely in the wrong. He knew that after his first confrontation with DeSalle, the guy had issued a harassment charge, and confronting him again would only worsen the situation. Mike obviously did not think the situation through, and probably only confronted DeSalle a second time because of how angry he was with his own situation with his fugitive father. Seeing DeSalle again probably only made him madder.

 

I think that Mike's scenes with DeSalle would have had a completely different outcome if Mike was capable of communicating with another human being properly. His interaction with the father and son on the boat could have gone very diffferently, but I don't think Mike is capable of doing what is necessary for that to happen. He is very introverted and solemn and has a tendency of pushing those who love him away, much like his father did.

 

I imagine Mike going up to this DeSalle guy and speaking in this monotone voice, rather cold and not very friendly. It's not something I, myself, would take to if I was the one being confronted, and I think that helped to set Anthony DeSalle off.

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Lildove3
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

The logging issue has the locals and sqwatters up in arms on various levels, it's affecting

 a small community of people who weren't hurting anyone,which is making havic.

 

Tourists come a get just a little taste of the outdoors,but for the locals this area is a way of life,in some respects Mikeis fortunate to have experience in both worlds, good and bad.

 

Desalle by far has the most arrogant attitude,on the other hand Mike should have quit

while he was ahead,he was over stepping it a bit with the second go around with Desalle.

 

I truly think she has deep feelings for Mike, it's too bad Mike is so fickled.

 

Mike's mom still loves his dad, even though she had some tough situations,there is a weird sense of loyalty for Mike's dad from his mom.

 

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JoanieGranola
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider? The takeover seems to be a focal point of the killings, but other than the obvious distress to the renters, I can't see where it's going. The whole town is full of suspects - especially those affected by the takeover.

 

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in? The life for the locals is quite and they prefer it that way. The life for the tourists is busy and causes havoc for the locals by disrupting their peaceful/calm existence in their wilderness. It would appear from the author's descriptino that the tourists think they "own" the beautiful vacation spot for the time they spend there. Mike fits in because he's a loner who loves the wilderness and wants to do the right thing because he believes in justice. He doesn't fit in because he seems to have an awkward social presence - he gets along with people fine enough, but the scars from his childhood (caused by both his mother and father) create difficulties for him in forming relationships and communicating with people - especially those closest to him.

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to? Anthony DeSalle definitely has the bigger attitude. He thinks he's better than Mike and seems to enjoy causing trouble for others and, as Mike stated, has anger management issues. Mike is in the right, but he's walking a fine line because of the anger/stress he's dealing with ove the problem with his father. He definitely has just cause to do his job, but knowing that this man has complained about him already is dangerous. Mike is better at communicating with strangers than people he's close to. He has strong feelings in his relationships, but he has a hard time getting people to completely understand him. The stress he's under is causing him to make questionable judgment calls and he's lashing out at the people he cares about because he's got a self-destructive behavior. He doesn't want to be completely alone, but he can't believe that anyone can truly care for him or that he deserves their love. He was abandoned by his father and his mother has an unhealthy interest with appearances and what others will think (of her). His parents are both selfish people in their own way, and that's affected how he has grown from a boy into a man.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah? Obviously, Mike's ex still cares for him as he does for her. She wants to be with him, but she's a little too similar to his mother in her material needs. Mike is right in his opinion that he'll never make her happy, but he's also denying himself happiness by building a wall around himself and sabbotaging this relationship. I'm not sure that he really loves her so much as he just doesn't want to be completely alone. I can see Mike in a relationship with Kathy, but for his obvious self-destructive behavior with relationships. I think Kathy would be a better match for him than Sarah.

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her? With the information provided about Mike's mother, she's not the helpless waif you believe her to be from the little information given about the divorce in the beginning of the story. She's not a bad mother and she loves her son, but she also appears to suffer somewhat from battered woman syndrome. Neither she nor Mike believe that Jack is capable of killing a person, but he poaches animals with blatant disregard. Jack is probably very capable of killing a human being, but they are both fooling themselves in keeping blinders on regarding Jack's potential, especially given his penchant for violence. Of course, they know him better than others, but their protestations of his innocence fall upon deaf ears because of Jack's checkered past.

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JuneC
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

 

Rachel-K wrote:

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony DeSalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

The ugly behavior from both characters is huge!  What brought that on?  Mike has a bone to pick and DeSalle happens to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.  DeSalle  apparently is not used to this role reversal.  He probably always gets and does what he wants without interference.  

Neither  man is "right" both need to take a step back and get a grip!  Especially with a child watching.

MIke communication skills need some work.

 

 

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BookWoman718
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Just wanted to comment that I don't think Mike's mom taking calls from his dad means that she's still in love with him.   They married young and unformed and have a long history together.  She moved on from him and probably feels a little sorry for him, left in that life that has so little of everything she values:  material comforts, stability, education and opportunity for their son, 'respectability.'    She knows her leaving hurt him, and that he's never forgotten her.  He calls when he's drunk, and sad.   She talks to him to be kind and because, although he wasn't the husband she wanted, she once cared for him.  Note that SHE doesn't call HIM, she just takes his calls.   And she doesn't tell her husband because he would obviously prefer that she not be haunted in that way by a relationship that's over.  Why tell him?   He'd be concerned, and for no good reason.  She's been done with Jack for a long time;  there's no threat to her marriage if she's just kind to him.  She's happy where she is, and she doesn't tell anyone because the calls don't mean that much to her - it's a kindness she does for Jack. 

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dhaupt
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

 

BookWoman718 wrote:

Just wanted to comment that I don't think Mike's mom taking calls from his dad means that she's still in love with him.   They married young and unformed and have a long history together.  She moved on from him and probably feels a little sorry for him, left in that life that has so little of everything she values:  material comforts, stability, education and opportunity for their son, 'respectability.'    She knows her leaving hurt him, and that he's never forgotten her.  He calls when he's drunk, and sad.   She talks to him to be kind and because, although he wasn't the husband she wanted, she once cared for him.  Note that SHE doesn't call HIM, she just takes his calls.   And she doesn't tell her husband because he would obviously prefer that she not be haunted in that way by a relationship that's over.  Why tell him?   He'd be concerned, and for no good reason.  She's been done with Jack for a long time;  there's no threat to her marriage if she's just kind to him.  She's happy where she is, and she doesn't tell anyone because the calls don't mean that much to her - it's a kindness she does for Jack. 

 

 

If it's no threat to her marriage, why not tell her husband about the phone calls from Jack. So he'll be mad or concerned but why keep secrets from your husband. And I agree with you that she doesn't love Jack anymore, I think she does it because her ego likes it that Jack still thinks about her, I think it adds to her shallowness. If she keeps little secrets like this, does she also keep bigger ones?

Just a thought.

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ssizemore
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

 

DSaff wrote:

How central or distant does the takeover of the logging seem so far in the story? What role do these local politics play in the lives of the residents here? Do you have any other possible suspects to consider?

 

I think the takeover is huge in the story because it has created so many suspects for me. There are many people who will be displaced if the land is actually taken, and their lives will be forever changed. Some of them have everything invested in the land and their business there. But, who wanted these men dead is still to be revealed.

 

Compare life for the tourists and life for most of the locals. How does Mike fit in?


Tourists are able to relax and enjoy the water and woods, while the locals work hard to provide food, shelter, and supplies for the tourists. There is always something to do when people come to visit, and this area is no different. The locals knew each other and watched out for each other. They were a community.

 

In Mike's scenes so far with Anthony Desalle--who's got the bigger attitude? Is Mike in the right? Is Mike any better at communicating with the people he's close to?

 

Mike is doing his job, but it seems he is taking it to the extreme. He might make more headway if he was more pleasant, rather than ready to whip out a ticket anytime he sees Desalle. But, Desalle acts guilty and I am wondering if there is more here. He is awful to his son, and belligerent and uncooperative with Mike. While he grudgingly pulls out paperwork, etc., there is more to him and his attitude.

 

Do you have much impression of Mike's ex-girlfriend, Sarah?

 

I think Sarah and Mike still love each other, but neither is willing to bend to meet the other half way. It seems that she genuinely wanted to help Mike, but both of them ended up hurt again. I am still hoping they can work things out.

 

We meet Mike's mother in these chapters--what is your impression of her?

 

Ahhh, Mike’s mother still loves his father, and it is reciprocal. She has kept his phone calls from her husband and son, keeping them private. She can’t live with him, but misses him badly. It may be that she wishes she could go back in time and try to fix things. Right now, she is a woman who is afraid of what might happen in the murder investigation and what she will do if her husband finds out about the phone calls.

 

WOW!  So much interesting food for thought.  I do think that they logging issue comes right from the headlines.  We are often seeing stories of the conflict of economic and natural concerns.  Certainly the people in the area don't want their beautiful wilderness destroyed.  We see the results of logging here in Georgia and it creates a scene of desolation until the forest can be reclaimed.  The economy of much of Maine depends on tourism, whether it be the love of the coast or the love of the outdoor sports that are available.  Nobody wants their home spoiled by those who are inconsiderate, whether it be industry or tourists on vacation who have no regard for the locals.  Let's face it, people can be demanding, careless, and rude.  However, the balance has to be struck in order for the locals to survive.  This is so clear in the encounter Mike has with LaSalle.  The "outsider" is rude and feels entitled to walk all over the rules and requirements that are in place.  Granted, Mike does assert his power in an unpleasant way (especially the second time), but all would have been well if both used common courtesy.  Of course, that would have removed an important tension in the plot of the story.

I think that both women in the story are conflicted.  Sara would like to be with Mike, but somehow the relationship isn't right.  In the same way, Mike's mother still has feeling for his father, but could not survive in a marriage to him.  Mike is also hoping that his father isn't involved because, in spite of everything, he cares for him.  This is also a real problem--we often hear of children and wives who are abused who still decide to be with the abuser.  Difficult to understand, but very real.

I have to think about an interesting thing we have learned in our time visiting in Maine (nearly 25 years!).  If you are born anywhere but Maine, you are "from Away".  There is a funny story about someone being rushed across the border to be born when her mother suddenly went into labor while on vacation in New Hampshire.  That way, she would not be "from Away".  This story was told to me by an elderly lady about her own birth.  She told it with a twinkle in her eye!  I am very conscious of treating the people and the landscape of Maine as if it were my home.  Our visits are wonderful--and I am "from Away"! Sandy

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literature
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

thewanderingjew wrote:

I would like to think that DeSalle is part of the murder conspiracy, part of the group attempting to frame Mike's dad. I would like to see him get caught and get his comeuppance for his superior obnoxious attitude and behavior. Yet, I would hate to think of his son also having to deal with a crooked parent. Having a verbally abusive, pompous and thoughtless father was surely enough for him to deal with, I think.

There are similarities between DeSalle and Mike's dad. Both are irresponsible and although DeSalle, at first blush, doesn't seem as reckless as Mike's dad, i.e, taking him with him in inclement weather while he was sick causing him to get pneumonia, he doesn't appear to be very interested in the boy's safety and doesn't provide equipment to protect him. It is a thin line that prevents him from being as reckless and that is the fact that the son returns without injury.

 

Perhaps Mike is so bent on teaching DeSalle a lesson because he sees the abuse and neglect the boy is suffering from and realizes the potential danger with which he identifies.

 

 


It's crossed my mind that the boy may just be there as a deterrent for whatever DeSalle is involved in.   Just a thought. 

 

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

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nfam
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

In these middle chapters Mike seems to be very distressed. He stirs up trouble with DeSalle in their second encounter. While DeSalle was wrong the first time, it seems that Mike is pushing him when they meet up again. 

 

I found the scene with his mother fascinating. Clearly both she and Mike have not gotten over his father. Mike seems extremely surprised to find that his mother is still in contact with his father. I know children often don't understand what's happening in their parents lives, but Mike has, it seems to me, built up a fantasy picture of his mother. 

 

Sarah wants to help him and be with him, but like the others in his life, Mike pushes her away. He seems to want to be alone to come to grips with his feelings for his father. 

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lannulis
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎12-09-2009

Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Mike's mom -

 

I felt that she was someone who was naive, but also wanted to be that way.  Life is sometime easier not knowing what you ought to know.

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Do you mean that the little boy is being used as a distraction by his dad, DeSalle, so he can do underhanded or illegal things? It is an interesting idea and it makes DeSalle even less likable.
literature wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

I would like to think that DeSalle is part of the murder conspiracy, part of the group attempting to frame Mike's dad. I would like to see him get caught and get his comeuppance for his superior obnoxious attitude and behavior. Yet, I would hate to think of his son also having to deal with a crooked parent. Having a verbally abusive, pompous and thoughtless father was surely enough for him to deal with, I think.

There are similarities between DeSalle and Mike's dad. Both are irresponsible and although DeSalle, at first blush, doesn't seem as reckless as Mike's dad, i.e, taking him with him in inclement weather while he was sick causing him to get pneumonia, he doesn't appear to be very interested in the boy's safety and doesn't provide equipment to protect him. It is a thin line that prevents him from being as reckless and that is the fact that the son returns without injury.

 

Perhaps Mike is so bent on teaching DeSalle a lesson because he sees the abuse and neglect the boy is suffering from and realizes the potential danger with which he identifies.

 

 


It's crossed my mind that the boy may just be there as a deterrent for whatever DeSalle is involved in.   Just a thought. 

 

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

 



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BookBobBP
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Registered: ‎04-30-2009
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Re: Poacher's Son: Middle Chapters, 8 - 18

Sarah definitely is still in love with Mike.  Mike is afraid of this relationship.  Mike attitude seems to be a little like his father right now.  We see this in a few areas in the book. dealing with the guy with the boat, listening to his boss, and his relationship with Sarah.