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Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Paul-Doiron wrote:

 

ginger2010 wrote:

Your book is compelling and hard to put down. 

 

I was just wondering if you considered Kathy Frost as a possible love interest for Mike when writing this book?

 

Thanks for the opportunity to read your great book.

 

 

Hi Ginger:

 

Someone predicted that Mike's romantic life is destined to take some twists and turns until he can grow up a little more. I won't comment on that, but I will say that Mike views Kathy more like the big sister he never had. Kathy cares for Mike (and understands him better in some ways than he does himself) but she is also his supervisor who understands her responsibility to the Maine Warden Service. And she, too, is more complicated than she seems, as you'll discover in the next book.

 

Paul 

VtCozy wrote..Glad that I read that Kathy will play  a major role in your Mike Bowditch Series..I feel that you have so much inside you to share with us..I see a sibling for Mike,from long ago,another secret..I suppose  readers do this,our imaginations go wild when we want the story to go.on.Your depiction of Maine,is of course accurate,and so discriptive,that yes to all have not been there,,The cover is Maine as you have stated,and so like other remote area's of of counrty,that your audience will be broad,for sure...Universal appeal Will look for your touring schedule.on your site..On Chapter 25...Susan Vt..

 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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AIRKNITTER
Posts: 133
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

When is the next book being published? What a great story! I want more!!!

Aine

Children are the living message we send to a time we will not see.
Author
Paul-Doiron
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎01-13-2010
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

 

AIRKNITTER wrote:

When is the next book being published? What a great story! I want more!!!

Aine

 

 

Aine,

 

That's the reaction every new author dreams of getting. I'm currently finishing my revision of the second novel (Charlie is an excellent editor and had some great suggestions). Minotaur is aiming for a late spring/early summer 2011 release for it, as far as I know.

 

Paul

 

PS. Today is the last day to ask questions of Charlie Spicer, so if you do have any more questions for my editor (about publishing in general or my book in particular), today's the day!

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
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eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Unfortunately, even though a woman is an excellent outdoorsperson, it is still dangerous for a woman to be alone in the woods as in this news article from my local paper. Not to be morbid put this is a reality for women:

 

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/the_intelligencer/the_intelligencer_news_details/article/27/20...

BookWoman718 wrote:

 

 

Peppermill wrote:

 

.

 

I was initially quite unhappy with the female game warden supervisor.  I was afraid she was going to be that gratuitous character urged upon the new generation of writers in toney writers' workshops, along with the disabled, et al.  But, she grew on me as the story progressed and seemed to take on a justifiable role. 

 

Pepper, when I read your earlier comment about the female game warden possibly being a token, I was taken aback, as that thought had never occurred to me as I read.  I assumed that in this day and age, female superiors in a law enforcement setting were routine.  I was curious and actually went to the Maine Game Warden website to see what I could find out.  I didn't see any direct  stats on the gender breakdown, but the service did appear to be overwhelmingly male.  So you had a valid point.    Then, about a page of posts ago, Paul addressed the issue directly, commenting that while there were and are some very fine women in the service, the proportion of them is, in his opinion, far too low.   I liked his reasons for including this character just as she is, however, and perhaps a successful novel about the Game Warden Service will bring attention to what could be a fine job opportunity for enthusiastic outdoorswomen.  Let's hope so!   

And note to Paul:  fictionally, I think Mike deserves to meet a great new female recruit who would be as devoted to the lifestyle as he is!

 

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
Author
Paul-Doiron
Posts: 129
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

 

eadieburke wrote:

Unfortunately, even though a woman is an excellent outdoorsperson, it is still dangerous for a woman to be alone in the woods as in this news article from my local paper. Not to be morbid put this is a reality for women:

 

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/the_intelligencer/the_intelligencer_news_details/article/27/20...

BookWoman718 wrote:

 

 

Peppermill wrote:

 

.

 

I was initially quite unhappy with the female game warden supervisor.  I was afraid she was going to be that gratuitous character urged upon the new generation of writers in toney writers' workshops, along with the disabled, et al.  But, she grew on me as the story progressed and seemed to take on a justifiable role. 

 

Pepper, when I read your earlier comment about the female game warden possibly being a token, I was taken aback, as that thought had never occurred to me as I read.  I assumed that in this day and age, female superiors in a law enforcement setting were routine.  I was curious and actually went to the Maine Game Warden website to see what I could find out.  I didn't see any direct  stats on the gender breakdown, but the service did appear to be overwhelmingly male.  So you had a valid point.    Then, about a page of posts ago, Paul addressed the issue directly, commenting that while there were and are some very fine women in the service, the proportion of them is, in his opinion, far too low.   I liked his reasons for including this character just as she is, however, and perhaps a successful novel about the Game Warden Service will bring attention to what could be a fine job opportunity for enthusiastic outdoorswomen.  Let's hope so!   

And note to Paul:  fictionally, I think Mike deserves to meet a great new female recruit who would be as devoted to the lifestyle as he is!

 

 

 

That's a very sad story. As a Maine Guide, I actually discourage anyone—male or female—from venturing into the wilderness alone. All it takes is tripping on a tree root and knocking your head, and your life can be in jeopardy. It's always better to bring along a buddy and have a plan in case of emergencies.

 

Paul

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
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rosia408
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎12-01-2009
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Not a question, but so glad to hear that this character of Mike Bowditch will be central in a small series of mysteries. I was one of those persons who could not put this book down. Now that we have finished the book, as an eternal optimist, I was hoping for a different ending, but it is what it is. I an anxiously awaiting further books about this character so we can see how he matures. I have never read a book about a game warden before and wasn't sure I would enjoy it as much as I did. I will recommend it to all my friends! Thanks for writing it and being here with us on our First Look club.

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Paul-Doiron
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

 

rosia408 wrote:

Not a question, but so glad to hear that this character of Mike Bowditch will be central in a small series of mysteries. I was one of those persons who could not put this book down. Now that we have finished the book, as an eternal optimist, I was hoping for a different ending, but it is what it is. I an anxiously awaiting further books about this character so we can see how he matures. I have never read a book about a game warden before and wasn't sure I would enjoy it as much as I did. I will recommend it to all my friends! Thanks for writing it and being here with us on our First Look club.

 

 

I'm glad you want to continue following Mike on his journey. I'm hoping it will be a long series of mysteries and not a short one, but we shall see. In any case, thank you in advance for sharing my book with your friends.

 

Paul

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
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ginger2010
Posts: 7
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Oops!  Hit the wrong button.  Meant to say "I can't wait for your next book!"

Wordsmith
BookWoman718
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Paul-Doiron wrote:

 

nbmars wrote:

First I would like to say that I also could not stick to the reading schedule as I loved this book and was unable to put it down.  I have a question about the meta process of writing.  When you are writing a flawed character like Mike, are you tempted to have him grow out of his flaws to appeal more to readers?  How do you stay true to his character without "fixing" him?

 

 

Hi,

 

First of all, thank you. I've been thrilled to get this reaction from others here since it's the first time "actual readers," as opposed to publishing promotionals and critics, have engaged with the book.

 

Your question is an excellent one, and this issue is at the center of the next novel. If you've read all the way to the end of The Poacher's Son, you know that Mike emerges from this story with some reasons for hope, but he's been intensely damaged by what's he gone through. The challenge for me in the first book was making Mike likable despite his immature impulsiveness; the challenge in the second book is depicting a haunted, hurting man in a way that makes him relatable. He can't be self-pitying or the reader will run for the hills. Instead I have to find ways of making his flaws understandable and show growth in his character throughout the story (as I hope I did in The Poacher's Son). Readers needs to root for Mike—because they know his heart is good and they feel compassion for him—even if they sometimes become frustrated by his actions.

 

So it's definitely a tall order I've set for myself. But the challenge is really what excites me about writing this character.

 

Paul

 

Paul,

I'm really glad to hear you're planning to let Mike's character develop through some ups and downs.   I hope readers don't get turned off by that;  people do change, as 'stuff happens' to them.  Especially from what they seem to be at 24.   It'll be interesting - just as it is in real life - to watch a young man grow from his earliest stage of maturity through the years that follow.  I have a lot of faith that he's on a good path and has a great set of basic values.  Even if he stumbles here and there, I'm pretty sure he's going to turn out fine, and make all us readers who met him early on, proud to have known him back when. 

Wordsmith
BookWoman718
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

eadieburke wrote:

Unfortunately, even though a woman is an excellent outdoorsperson, it is still dangerous for a woman to be alone in the woods as in this news article from my local paper. Not to be morbid put this is a reality for women:

 

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/the_intelligencer/the_intelligencer_news_details/article/27/20...

BookWoman718 wrote:

 

 

Peppermill wrote:

 

.

 

I was initially quite unhappy with the female game warden supervisor.  I was afraid she was going to be that gratuitous character urged upon the new generation of writers in toney writers' workshops, along with the disabled, et al.  But, she grew on me as the story progressed and seemed to take on a justifiable role. 

 

Pepper, when I read your earlier comment about the female game warden possibly being a token, I was taken aback, as that thought had never occurred to me as I read.  I assumed that in this day and age, female superiors in a law enforcement setting were routine.  I was curious and actually went to the Maine Game Warden website to see what I could find out.  I didn't see any direct  stats on the gender breakdown, but the service did appear to be overwhelmingly male.  So you had a valid point.    Then, about a page of posts ago, Paul addressed the issue directly, commenting that while there were and are some very fine women in the service, the proportion of them is, in his opinion, far too low.   I liked his reasons for including this character just as she is, however, and perhaps a successful novel about the Game Warden Service will bring attention to what could be a fine job opportunity for enthusiastic outdoorswomen.  Let's hope so!   

And note to Paul:  fictionally, I think Mike deserves to meet a great new female recruit who would be as devoted to the lifestyle as he is!

 

 

Eadie,

You are so right; a woman alone - whether in the woods or on a city street or even a dark neighborhood park - faces dangers that many men wouldn't have to give a thought to.  But Paul is right, too.  Anyone, male or female, is probably ill-advised to venture into the woods on their own.  And a number of years ago, I knew a couple who hiked into the wilderness together, a several-day trip, and on about the third day, the woman fell and broke an ankle.  Her husband had to leave her with what supplies he could, and hike out to get help.  Obviously, pre-cell phone or GPS days.  So she was alone out there, injured, for two more days.  You just never know.  I live in Phoenix, and we have people who wander off the trails in our mountainous city parks, and get injured, all the time.  A few die.  Those are the chances we take to do the things we love, or work at jobs we love.   That doesn't change the fact that for some women, living and working in the outdoors, or in other risky settings, fulfills them in a way that no other occupation can offer.  The Maine Game Warden Service could use a few more good women. 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Good Morning Paul,I just finished "The Poachers Son" about ten minutes ago,and being very emotional at the end,I thank you for trusting us, and speaking to us here ,and through your tense,page turner and beautifully written book.I anxiously await our discussions with you,and all of my fellow readers. I must say  "This is a Wonderful introduction to your writing" 'You have managed to write a very precise,yet emotionally  driven book.I think you know the depth of the characters so well..It certainly came across that way.Now that you have given us Mike ,Sarah,Kathy,Charley and Ora...I am imagining more stories,and look forward to your next book..Have a Great Sunday  Susan,VtC...

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Paul,

I have finished the book also.  And I agree with Vermontcozy. You have such strong characters that get us emotionally attached. I think this has enhanced the mystery part of the book. From the posts on the board, people are rooting for, defending, upset with the characters. It didn't end up the way I had predicted. And that is good. I like a book that takes me on that ride of thinking I know, then the next chapter will change my mind. Thank you for a great book. Looking forward to your next book.

pen21

 

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning Paul,I just finished "The Poachers Son" about ten minutes ago,and being very emotional at the end,I thank you for trusting us, and speaking to us here ,and through your tense,page turner and beautifully written book.I anxiously await our discussions with you,and all of my fellow readers. I must say  "This is a Wonderful introduction to your writing" 'You have managed to write a very precise,yet emotionally  driven book.I think you know the depth of the characters so well..It certainly came across that way.Now that you have given us Mike ,Sarah,Kathy,Charley and Ora...I am imagining more stories,and look forward to your next book..Have a Great Sunday  Susan,VtC...

 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

pen21 wrote:

Paul,

I have finished the book also.  And I agree with Vermontcozy. You have such strong characters that get us emotionally attached. I think this has enhanced the mystery part of the book. From the posts on the board, people are rooting for, defending, upset with the characters. It didn't end up the way I had predicted. And that is good. I like a book that takes me on that ride of thinking I know, then the next chapter will change my mind. Thank you for a great book. Looking forward to your next book.

pen21

 

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning Paul,I just finished "The Poachers Son" about ten minutes ago,and being very emotional at the end,I thank you for trusting us, and speaking to us here ,and through your tense,page turner and beautifully written book.I anxiously await our discussions with you,and all of my fellow readers. I must say  "This is a Wonderful introduction to your writing" 'You have managed to write a very precise,yet emotionally  driven book.I think you know the depth of the characters so well..It certainly came across that way.Now that you have given us Mike ,Sarah,Kathy,Charley and Ora...I am imagining more stories,and look forward to your next book..Have a Great Sunday  Susan,Vtc

 

 

 

Thanks Pen21,I agree now we are attached to the Characters,and look forward to all the mysteries and stories that surround them..I also didn't know where Paul was taking us,and that makes us both curious to continue with watching Mike grow,and wonder,what is on the Maine Horizon for him and all the others...Susan..(I think I lined everything up.,looks good).

 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Inspired Wordsmith
eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

BookWoman718 wrote:

eadieburke wrote:

Unfortunately, even though a woman is an excellent outdoorsperson, it is still dangerous for a woman to be alone in the woods as in this news article from my local paper. Not to be morbid put this is a reality for women:

 

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/the_intelligencer/the_intelligencer_news_details/article/27/20...

BookWoman718 wrote:

 

 

Peppermill wrote:

 

.

 

I was initially quite unhappy with the female game warden supervisor.  I was afraid she was going to be that gratuitous character urged upon the new generation of writers in toney writers' workshops, along with the disabled, et al.  But, she grew on me as the story progressed and seemed to take on a justifiable role. 

 

Pepper, when I read your earlier comment about the female game warden possibly being a token, I was taken aback, as that thought had never occurred to me as I read.  I assumed that in this day and age, female superiors in a law enforcement setting were routine.  I was curious and actually went to the Maine Game Warden website to see what I could find out.  I didn't see any direct  stats on the gender breakdown, but the service did appear to be overwhelmingly male.  So you had a valid point.    Then, about a page of posts ago, Paul addressed the issue directly, commenting that while there were and are some very fine women in the service, the proportion of them is, in his opinion, far too low.   I liked his reasons for including this character just as she is, however, and perhaps a successful novel about the Game Warden Service will bring attention to what could be a fine job opportunity for enthusiastic outdoorswomen.  Let's hope so!   

And note to Paul:  fictionally, I think Mike deserves to meet a great new female recruit who would be as devoted to the lifestyle as he is!

 

 

Eadie,

You are so right; a woman alone - whether in the woods or on a city street or even a dark neighborhood park - faces dangers that many men wouldn't have to give a thought to.  But Paul is right, too.  Anyone, male or female, is probably ill-advised to venture into the woods on their own.  And a number of years ago, I knew a couple who hiked into the wilderness together, a several-day trip, and on about the third day, the woman fell and broke an ankle.  Her husband had to leave her with what supplies he could, and hike out to get help.  Obviously, pre-cell phone or GPS days.  So she was alone out there, injured, for two more days.  You just never know.  I live in Phoenix, and we have people who wander off the trails in our mountainous city parks, and get injured, all the time.  A few die.  Those are the chances we take to do the things we love, or work at jobs we love.   That doesn't change the fact that for some women, living and working in the outdoors, or in other risky settings, fulfills them in a way that no other occupation can offer.  The Maine Game Warden Service could use a few more good women. 

At least, the female Game Warden is trained and carries a gun for protection! She will then have a better chance of survival, if she is attacked by animal or man!

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
Author
Paul-Doiron
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎01-13-2010
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning Paul,I just finished "The Poachers Son" about ten minutes ago,and being very emotional at the end,I thank you for trusting us, and speaking to us here ,and through your tense,page turner and beautifully written book.I anxiously await our discussions with you,and all of my fellow readers. I must say  "This is a Wonderful introduction to your writing" 'You have managed to write a very precise,yet emotionally  driven book.I think you know the depth of the characters so well..It certainly came across that way.Now that you have given us Mike ,Sarah,Kathy,Charley and Ora...I am imagining more stories,and look forward to your next book..Have a Great Sunday  Susan,VtC...

 

 

Thank you, Susan. It's my pleasure to do this. Talking about the book without giving away the end has been a challenge, and I'm looking forward to the next couple of weeks of conversation.

 

Paul

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
Author
Paul-Doiron
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎01-13-2010
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

 

pen21 wrote:

Paul,

I have finished the book also.  And I agree with Vermontcozy. You have such strong characters that get us emotionally attached. I think this has enhanced the mystery part of the book. From the posts on the board, people are rooting for, defending, upset with the characters. It didn't end up the way I had predicted. And that is good. I like a book that takes me on that ride of thinking I know, then the next chapter will change my mind. Thank you for a great book. Looking forward to your next book.

pen21

 

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning Paul,I just finished "The Poachers Son" about ten minutes ago,and being very emotional at the end,I thank you for trusting us, and speaking to us here ,and through your tense,page turner and beautifully written book.I anxiously await our discussions with you,and all of my fellow readers. I must say  "This is a Wonderful introduction to your writing" 'You have managed to write a very precise,yet emotionally  driven book.I think you know the depth of the characters so well..It certainly came across that way.Now that you have given us Mike ,Sarah,Kathy,Charley and Ora...I am imagining more stories,and look forward to your next book..Have a Great Sunday  Susan,VtC...

 

 

 

 

Pen,

 

Thank you for the great note. Having readers rooting for, defending, and upset with the characters is exactly what I'd hoped to achieve.

 

My own taste in reading leans towards novels that depict people as the complicated creatures we actually are. I recently read War and Peace after blowing if off in college—my loss!—and was completely struck by how real Tolstoy's characters seem. What an incredible achievement.

 

Paul  

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
Frequent Contributor
librarysusie
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎07-21-2009
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Paul-Doiron wrote:

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning Paul,I just finished "The Poachers Son" about ten minutes ago,and being very emotional at the end,I thank you for trusting us, and speaking to us here ,and through your tense,page turner and beautifully written book.I anxiously await our discussions with you,and all of my fellow readers. I must say  "This is a Wonderful introduction to your writing" 'You have managed to write a very precise,yet emotionally  driven book.I think you know the depth of the characters so well..It certainly came across that way.Now that you have given us Mike ,Sarah,Kathy,Charley and Ora...I am imagining more stories,and look forward to your next book..Have a Great Sunday  Susan,VtC...

 

 

Thank you, Susan. It's my pleasure to do this. Talking about the book without giving away the end has been a challenge, and I'm looking forward to the next couple of weeks of conversation.

 

Paul

 

I agree Paul!!!I can't wait to talk about the ending~!

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Zeal
Posts: 258
Registered: ‎03-18-2009
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

Paul,

 

Like everyone else, I really enjoyed your novel (yes, I was one that could not put it down)!!  It is a remarkable debut, and I cannot wait to read your future books.  When you are commissioned to write three novels, does that happen after only reading your first, or do you have to map out the additional two novels for the publishing company?

 

Thank you for allowing us to be a part of your first audience...it was a great privilege and a pleasure to read The Poacher's Son!

 

Aimee

"I learned to dream through reading, learned to create dreams through writing, and learned to develop dreamers through teaching. I shall always be a dreamer."
Sharon Draper
Author
Paul-Doiron
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎01-13-2010
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

 

Zeal wrote:

Paul,

 

Like everyone else, I really enjoyed your novel (yes, I was one that could not put it down)!!  It is a remarkable debut, and I cannot wait to read your future books.  When you are commissioned to write three novels, does that happen after only reading your first, or do you have to map out the additional two novels for the publishing company?

 

Thank you for allowing us to be a part of your first audience...it was a great privilege and a pleasure to read The Poacher's Son!

 

Aimee

 

 

Hi Aimee,

 

Thank you. I've been really pleased by the reactions I've gotten from the First Look readers. "Could not put it down" are words all authors want to hear.

 

In answer to your question, I wrote The Poacher's Son on my own time without a contract. I then went looking for a literary agent and was lucky to find an excellent one. She showed my book to a number of publishers, and Minotaur Books (which is a division of St. Martin's Press, which is a division of Macmillan, which is a division of a German company called the Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group) was the first to make a generous offer. One aspect of the deal that really won me over was that my contract is for three Mike Bowditch novels. I'd already completed one, of course, and have deadlines for completing the next two. (One of my deadlines is the end of this month, in fact.) I haven't had to supply Minotaur with outlines of these other two books although my editor, Charlie Spicer, and I have had a number of discussions about the direction I hope to take the series.

 

I've learned a lot about the publishing industry through this process and learn more each week. I'm happy to share what I know with people here.

 

Paul

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
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A_Mom_of_4
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-03-2010
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Re: Questions for Paul Doiron?

This is my first time to participate in this kind of forum and I must say I was very surprised at how much I enjoyed the book.  I would not have thought of myself as a fan of mysteries until I read this book.  The book was suspenseful and very interesting.  I liked that it explored so many different relationships and on a multitude of layers.  I liked how it was in the first person of Mike.  Have you ever contemplated writing some of the chapters also from the point of view of the other characters?  I am not suggesting changing the chapters but adding how the dad or BJ might be feeling or experiencing a particular situation.