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dhaupt
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

Charlie, I know it's your last day with us and I just wanted to say thanks for being very candid with us and answering all our questions. It was my pleasure having you here and I hope you'll be able to lurk in on us from time to time.

Thanks again.

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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

Dear Chariie,I just saw Debbie's post and wanted to thank you as well for taking the time to be here with us.Surely,it was quite an experience,and I hope it was a good one.'The Poachers Son" have been a joy to read,and I really look forwardd to the discussion next week with Paul.Looking forward to maybe catching  Paul at a Book Event in Vermont..Will follow his writing career and # 2 will be on my TBR list ..I am an Archer Mayor fan,so this book is  on my radar...Best..Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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CharlieSpicer
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

Thanks Tiffany.  Readers are entitled to their own opinions - and that's what makes reading books such an interesting experience, particulaly when we all compare notes and see what worked for us and what didn't.

 

Thanks for joining in!

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kstempien
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

nhawkinsII wrote:

 

...In my case...I realized I might not have given "The Poacher's Son" a second look at the bookstore...A quick assumption would have been "Oh, some type of hunting saga"...With that mindset I would have missed an interesting story and been so wrong!  Are there any type of "go to market" plans to combat these mistaken assumptions?" 

 

Thank in advance for your answers.

I must agree. I'm guilty of turning down a book if the back cover doesn't sound appealing, as I'm sure most of us do. I would've made the same decision if I looked at this in a bookstore, being intrigued by the cover, but let down that it involved hunting. That's the thing I love about the FL club, I find myself accepting to read books I wouldn't necessarily have read otherwise.

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wjbauer
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎12-02-2009

Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

I was in the Air Force and could swear with the "worst" of them. Then I found out that swearing didn't help what I wanted to say. I know that in the wilderness a lot of swearing goes on. But a book with these words doesn't help to get into the context of what is going on. I really liked the story and descriptions of Maine's backwoods and it held my interest to the end.

 

Was it your decision to approve the swear words or Paul's?

Wayne  

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edelweissAM
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

   Dear Mr. Spicer,

   

                           Thank you for helping to bring this wonderful book to us and for explaining the process of finding new books and new writers! I usually can tell whether I will like a book after reading the first page but sometimes I have been mistaken. Are there occasions when you love a book but others disagree with you? How do you  tell if a story line will make a good series?  What gets your attention when you read an introduction to a story? Thank you for your time.

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Paul-Doiron
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

 

wjbauer wrote:

I was in the Air Force and could swear with the "worst" of them. Then I found out that swearing didn't help what I wanted to say. I know that in the wilderness a lot of swearing goes on. But a book with these words doesn't help to get into the context of what is going on. I really liked the story and descriptions of Maine's backwoods and it held my interest to the end.

 

Was it your decision to approve the swear words or Paul's?

Wayne  

 

Hi Wayne:

 

 

Maybe I can answer this question on Charlie's behalf since he's left the forum now. First, I'm glad the story and setting resonated with you, and I can certainly understand that some of the language in the book put you off as a reader. I edit a widely read magazine that doesn't include any profanity so I'm accustomed to getting my points across without using vulgar words. But as a veteran, you know there are many rough places and rough men in the world. As an author I felt it would be dishonest to write about these people without using the actual (profane) language they use. I didn't want to sugarcoat anything. That was just the choice I decided to make. As my editor, Charlie could have suggested alternatives, but he agreed with my approach, knowing that some readers would find certain language and scenes objectionable.

 

Paul 

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

Paul-Doiron wrote:

 

wjbauer wrote:

I was in the Air Force and could swear with the "worst" of them. Then I found out that swearing didn't help what I wanted to say. I know that in the wilderness a lot of swearing goes on. But a book with these words doesn't help to get into the context of what is going on. I really liked the story and descriptions of Maine's backwoods and it held my interest to the end.

 

Was it your decision to approve the swear words or Paul's?

Wayne  

 

Hi Wayne:

 

 

Maybe I can answer this question on Charlie's behalf since he's left the forum now. First, I'm glad the story and setting resonated with you, and I can certainly understand that some of the language in the book put you off as a reader. I edit a widely read magazine that doesn't include any profanity so I'm accustomed to getting my points across without using vulgar words. But as a veteran, you know there are many rough places and rough men in the world. As an author I felt it would be dishonest to write about these people without using the actual (profane) language they use. I didn't want to sugarcoat anything. That was just the choice I decided to make. As my editor, Charlie could have suggested alternatives, but he agreed with my approach, knowing that some readers would find certain language and scenes objectionable.

 

Paul 

VermontCozy wrote;;I really like reading posts from a man's point of view,it really is important to me.I am glad that "The Poachers Son" is attracting a balanced audience.I was not surprised at the swearing,and didn't think there was enough of it to cause some readers to take offense,Present Company excluded,...It read very naturallly to me,given the setting and cast of characters..My first copy that I will buy when it is released is for a Friend I work with..70ish,Ski instructer,a dear man..When I brought the book to work,he started reading it..He needs to finish it,so I thought he would enjoy a copy of his own...very ying/yang of you Paul to be able to write a very gender friendly book...A GREAT mystery till the very end..Thank you...Susan Vtc

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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literature
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

 

Paul-Doiron wrote:

 

BookWoman718 wrote:

Hi Charlie,

 

and welcome to First Look.  We're all very happy that you've joined us, and I want to congratulate you on picking up this book.  It's a very good read;  what I like to describe as a literate mystery novel,  The writing itself sometimes stops you dead in your tracks and for just a moment you forget where the plot is going as you linger over a nice piece of description or characterization. 

My one question to you is, how much discussion was there about the inclusion of the graphic love-making scene?   It sort of came out of nowhere, as if suddenly I found myself in a bodice ripper.  I'm not at all sure it added to the story, but that might just be me.  I've lived a long time and don't really need to be fed the details of what an amorous romp looks like.  Been there, done that, you know?   If they're 24 and they slept together after some time of absence, wouldn't everyone know what that was going to be like, without all the description? 

So I guess I'm curious to know if you all agreed it needed to be there, and if so, why?  

Thanks again for being here to answer our questions.

 

 

Hi,

 

I'll actually be curious to hear Charlie's answer to this myself, but I thought it might help if I explained why I made the scene as graphic as I did. I struggled with the idea for a long time since I really didn't want to write a bodice ripper (believe me). But in the end here is what I decided: This is a highly descriptive book. I am taking great care to focus on sights, smells, and sounds—every detail I can to immerse the reader into this story. To not extend that same approach to the sex scene struck me as chickening out, frankly. I would have been violating my own aesthetic to pan away, as they do in movies, and return to them smoking cigarettes the next morning. And while some readers might not see it this way, I also thought the specifics of how Mike and Sarah make love establishes their characters in certain ways. Sarah's aggressiveness is not something she shows the world but it emerges in her sexual appetite, and I felt I need to show that.

 

Now let's hear what Charlie has to say. :smileyhappy:

 

Paul

 

 

The sex scene finally made Sarah and Mike seem like they had a real relationship.  Up to this point, their relationship seemed too sterile and boring for two people in their 20's.  We know that Mike can be explosive, but Sarah was just too passive.  The only time she became animated was when she voiced her opinion about money and status.  Sex is very much a part of life, just as the wilderness is, and to exclude it when every other type of emotion was being described would have made these two characters seem too unreal.  Sarah was reaching out to Mike and the love scene served not only as a release for Mike but was used for foreshadowing of future scenarios. 

 

Now Charley and Ora, on the other hand, do not need a sex scene for the reader to know how they felt about each other.  The love was felt in everything that Charley and Ora said and did and Paul did a great job in getting this across to the reader, so their love making is best left to the imagination.

 

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Paul-Doiron
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

 

literature wrote:

 

Now Charley and Ora, on the other hand, do not need a sex scene for the reader to know how they felt about each other.  The love was felt in everything that Charley and Ora said and did and Paul did a great job in getting this across to the reader, so their love making is best left to the imagination.

 

 

 

Agreed!

 

Paul

Author of THE POACHER'S SON (Minotaur Books, On Sale: May 11, 2010). www.pauldoiron.com
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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Paul's editor, Charlie Spicer?

Good Morning Charlie..We are having a"Virtual Get Together" in "The Poachers Son" Community Room  Just click on  and we are there"Cabin and all"..Will be up all day and Coffee is being served all day as well..Its just our way to Thank you and PaulD for "The Wonderful Book" The Poachers Son,which Paul has written so beautifully..many fans here..We await #2. Mike Bowditch has become an endearing character" and want to follow all his adventures.,life..pen21 found this great Maine Cabin..See you Later  Susan Vt.......

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer