Reply
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

 

I found this list of pow camps and was amazed at the number. Unless I missed it, ND was not mentioned. However, I found this site and if you scroll down there is a piece on Fort Lincoln in Bismarck, ND so some prisoners were housed there too.

Peppermill wrote:

 

Thanks for this post.  Lots of interesting information.  The statement in one about no POWs in ND caught my eye.  I saw an exhibit once saying that Germans were detained in Lincoln, ND, but they may have been citizens, not POWs.

 


 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Vtcozy wrote..I had seen the map and the article last night,but the Prison Camp article and adjoining blog were very informative..and a great link  while reading "The Poachers Son"Good research..Thanks
thewanderingjew wrote:

I posted this in the Community Room but I don't know if many people saw it. I found this really interesting.
This little article from 1944 might interest some readers. Also, if you have an interest in the historical maps of the area in which the book takes place, visit this link too.
Since I posted that I found a couple more interesting sites about the area mentioned in the prologue of the book. These pictures are of the area in the book from the late 1800's and also of pows.

Some eighth graders discovered a prison camp that was kept secret at Spencer Lake.


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Vtcozy wrote; Glad you are here with "The Poachers Son" Peppermill..Missed you on "Before I Fall"  twj did think you would've enjoyed the discussion...I agreed..Susan...


Peppermill wrote:

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

I posted this in the Community Room but I don't know if many people saw it. I found this really interesting.
This little article from 1944 might interest some readers. Also, if you have an interest in the historical maps of the area in which the book takes place, visit this link too.
Since I posted that I found a couple more interesting sites about the area mentioned in the prologue of the book. These pictures are of the area in the book from the late 1800's and also of pows.

Some eighth graders discovered a prison camp that was kept secret at Spencer Lake.


 

Thanks for this post.  Lots of interesting information.  The statement in one about no POWs in ND caught my eye.  I saw an exhibit once saying that Germans were detained in Lincoln, ND, but they may have been citizens, not POWs.

 


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Great Outdoors

I love books that deal with people living naturally, caring for what we have been given. Maine is a beautiful state filled with great places to explore and protect. Both Eternal on the Water and The Poacher's Son seem to have a theme of living in, and caring for, the forests and the animals/people that live there.

 

The bear seems to be hungry, and I suspect he has been fed by humans in some form or fashion. He went after a live pig, ate what he wanted and went away. I was amazed at what he left behind. I laughed at the bear, the woman, and the bacon story. She had left her back door open with just a screen between her and the outside world. Along came the bear who smelled the bacon, and decided he wanted some. This bear loves pork! Thankfully, she could close the door and call for help. But, if you live in the woods, you should be prepared for anything. The wilderness provides entertainment, peace, and of course, danger, so we need to be prepared for it.

 

Paul has written in a style that has put me in the woods and in the homes his characters inhabit. I am really enjoying this book and hope to visit Maine later this year.

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I loved the bear and the thigh master. too funny!  :smileywink:

 


momofprecious1 wrote:

 

What is the description of the bear like?

He was described as a big black, hungry bear. Mike believed him to be a medium sized bear about two hundred pounds or so. I was laughing when Mrs. Hersom said that the bear took the thighmaster, not what you think of when you think of a bear...lol.

 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Contributor
Zyna
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎01-07-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

This is my first novel as part of the FL book club, so I cannot comment on any of the prior novels discussed. However, I do think that the Maine wilderness plays a tremendous role in this story, as a setting and as a character that takes on a life of its own. It has its own jurisdiction, its own set of rules, and its own "police force" in the Game Warden Service to ensure that those laws are abided by. Those who live in or near to the Wilderness are just as protective of nature, and become easily angered when people like the representatives of the newspaper company try to come in and tear the forest down, turning the wilderness into a motive for murder.
 
What is the description of the bear like?

Mike Bowditch is under the impression that it is a medium-sized bear, about two hundred pounds or so. It apparently has a taste for bacon and enjoys working out on the Thighmaster X]

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 

Again, this is my first FL novel, but I think that Paul Doiron has a very descriptive writing style. He paints a picture that puts the reader right in the heart of the Maine wilderness, breathing in the still air, "heavy with the smell of growing things." His dialogues are natural and believable and it appears that the game wardening jargon was well-researched, adding to the believability. His characters are well thought out, and again thanks to Doiron's descriptive writing style, I can clearly envision them in my mind while reading.

Frequent Contributor
Rebz
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎01-06-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

The wilderness in Maine is the way of life, it is the pain sustenance of the people in the forest.  The people are very respectful and protective of it.  I think the wilderness IS the main character.

 

What is the description of the bear like?

 

The bear is described as being huge and hungry and scary...the bear even supposedly took the thighmaster (working out huh?) kind of adding to the idea that it was big and strong and scary.  To someone like Mike though, it wasn't quite that sensational.


How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 

Paul Doiron's writing style is very suspenseful and the POV of this book makes it very biased.  I've only read one other First Look book, Before I Fall, which was also told from a first person POV which also made it biased so its kind of similar there.

-Becca
Distinguished Correspondent
Bonnie_C
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎08-07-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

In Eternal on the Water, the wilderness was a means of escape for the characters, either from sickness or from the day to day events of life.  In this story, the wilderness becomes a way of life for the main character, Mike.  It is also a wonderful backdrop for the story.

 

The bear in this story to me is just another character.  It appears to be a very sly creature that I hope will continue to add humor through out the book.

 

I love the author's writing style.  All the characters are brought to life, the story is well told, the dialogue is believable and the suspense is hanging in the background to pique your curiosity.

Inspired Contributor
Zia01
Posts: 187
Registered: ‎08-08-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story? The wilderness is taking a major role in this book. It's one of the reason's I wanted to read it. I love stories that take place in the wilderness.

 

What is the description of the bear like? Well I've only read up to ch 7, but everyone is describing him as big, black, and mean oh and apparently has a taste for bacon and Thighmasters lol.

 

 

Frequent Contributor
Lildove3
Posts: 96
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

The bear's descrition appears to be veery hungry and upset that his tummy isn't being filled ...lol

 

It's obvious the wilderness is the big story line and background in this story,I feel without where the

story is taken place it might read like any other story,but Maine is very beautiful,I lived In NH right nextdoor to Maine, so the author is right on the money.

 

I just read stories,so I really don't know the difference,but I am enjoying the story emensly.

New User
mamaw4
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-01-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

My 1st time in First Look so I can't compare

 

The bear comes to life with his discriptions by the Bud, Mrs Hermson & Mike. He adds fear, laughter & wisdom in his discriptions.

 

I love the way he brings you into Maine & the caracters as the story progresses

Frequent Contributor
ms_linda
Posts: 125
Registered: ‎10-02-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

This is my first FL book so I can't compare to the other book. I've also never been to Maine but I have a pretty vivid picture in my mind based on the descriptions in the book. We have a family cabin in the Sierra's so I think I'm picturing a little of that scenery also. I'm fascinated by the warden's job and all that it entails.

Correspondent
jabrkeKB
Posts: 164
Registered: ‎11-15-2008

Re: The Great Outdoors

The wilderness in EOTW was peaceful and welcoming. In Poacher's Son the wilderness is action packed and maybe dangerous.

 

I will be curious to see if the bear is a side story or plays a role in the major plot.

Distinguished Correspondent
emmagrace
Posts: 162
Registered: ‎12-04-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I think that the Maine wilderness will play a huge roll in this story, not only because Mike is a game warden, but because there have been deaths and the seem to center around land being taken and being developed. There are several characters that want to preserve the land and all of the animals that inhabit it.

 

The bear is being extremely aggressive and has been going to extreme lengths to obtain the food it desires. I loved that the bear was seen with the thighmaster. It almost reminded me of a puppy playing with its toy. I wonder what has happened to make this bear act so aggressively.

 

Paul's writing really pulled me into the story and made me want more!

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: The Great Outdoors

[ Edited ]

 

In Eternal On The Water, the wilderness is a sanctuary. It is a place with restorative qualities for the Chungamunga Girls who enjoy communing with nature. All the Chungamunga girls have life threatening illnesses. For them, the wilderness is a source of tranquility and hope. The experiences they share there give them a sense of belonging. They are chosen to spend time there and they look forward to it. They form friendships and bond with each other developing a sense of loyalty as they gain the courage to face their lives.

In The Poacher's Son, the wilderness of Maine seems fraught with danger. It is a place where one needs protection. It is a place of escape and isolation where one can separate from the world and live using different rules without belonging to a group. Rather than rejuvenating it seems enervating for the women who want to escape the hardship of life there. They don't look forward to being there. Mike's mom left and Mike's wife left too. Both found their lives there were stagnant and unfulfilled. Being close to nature was a hardship.They wanted to be part of the larger world.

Rachel-K wrote:

 

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 


 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: The Great Outdoors

 


Vermontcozy wrote:

Vtcozy wrote: Thanks pen,you bring up Minnesota as having similar elements to the book.I have heard that before,and that the people are just as 'quirky"in a very good way..I have never traveled to Minnesota,but have seen pictures that a are quite beathtaking..The weather we share is almost the same..i just saw a slide show of "Ice Shanties on Medicine Lake".which were so beautifully built,I think the same project would be great in Maine,.Vt....


 

This is a redo of earlier attempted post that disappeared on me.

 

Is this the location with the Ice Shanties on Medicine Lake slides you mention, Susan?

 

Having lived in both Minnesota and Vermont, I have long said the experiences taught me the differences between a blizzard and a snowstorm.  Across the semi-arid prairies, the wind blows the snow into dune-like drifts along the fence lines and against barriers.  In New England, a poet can write:  “The snow began in the gloaming and busily all the night, had been heaping field and highway with a silence deep and white….”

 

When I went to check a fact or two in our 1982 World Book, I noticed that annual precipitation in Maine averages about 41 inches; Minnesota, 19-32 inches (NW to SE). Annual snowfall reportedly varies from about 70 inches near the coast to about 100 inches in the interior in Maine; Minnesota, about 20 inches in the SW and 70 inches in the NE (near Lake Superior).  It was the difference in the amount of moisture and its impact on vegetation, along with the mountainous areas, that I most noticed when I moved East.

 

I do believe the temperatures often are somewhat colder in Minnesota – I remember many times when International Falls was the coldest spot in the country.  (This site records temperature extremes in the various states through 2004.)  Certainly, Minnesota and northern Vermont, Maine, et al, call for hearty souls to bear the long winters, that often extend from early November, even October, well into April or the first weeks of May -- very unlike the lovely New Jersey springs with so many flowering trees and bushes beginning as early as March (but probably not this year).  Minnesota and the prairies tend to have fewer hardwoods and more golden yellows in the fall than the gorgeous paisley crimsons and oranges of New England and the mid-Atlantic.

 

Iron ore mining is associated with northern Minnesota, whereas paper mills and, once, textile mills provided backbone industry in Maine.  Although Minnesota has many lovely lakes and streams with cascading falls, Maine and its Appalachian mountains probably have more indigenous water power, although that is speculation, not known fact on my part.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Correspondent
CJINCA
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎11-28-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

 

In Eternal on the Water, the relationships with nature was very romanticized; we saw how some remarkable, extraordinary people live with nature in an idealized way.  In The Poacher's Son, though, the people are more down-to-earth, they're regular, ordinary people like ones I know. Here, the poachers and wardens and snowmobilers have a less-idealized, less-romanticized relationship with nature than the folks in the earlier book.

 

The scenes about the bear were kind of funny in a surrealistic way.  Bud Thompson says, "I loved that pig" and "He was the smartest pig I ever had!" (p7).  There's a little black humor there (no disrespect to the pig).  And Mike tells Mrs Hersom that the bear won't try to get in the house...of course she had just seen the bear claw the back door off its hinges (pp42-3)...so much for professional assurances from the game warden.  I like the banter between Mike and his boss as the set they bear trap, too -- you could see here that confident as he is, Mike has a lot to learn.

 

I like Paul Doiron's writing style.  So far it's been pretty straightforward, I was expecting that with a mystery novel.  I'm enjoying the book very much.

 

-- C.

 

 

 

New User
meeditoria
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎02-02-2010

Re: The Great Outdoors

The Maine woods becomes a character, looming, concealing and revealing, and even seemingly grasping people and sucking them in. Mike seems to be more connected to them than to any actual person in his past or present.

 

The setting is at once foreign to me, living in suburban sprawl, and known, raised in the backwoods of the Midwest. My parents just had a run-in with a huge black bear, so I'm interested in getting in this one's head, so to speak. My real bear was very odd: out of season, strolling in broad daylight (but in a relatively sparsely populated, wooded environment), and was run off by a dog of 30 pounds.

 

I'm getting drawn in by The Poacher's Son and enjoying it so far.

Inspired Contributor
lg4154
Posts: 72
Registered: ‎02-06-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I think the Maine wilderness plays a role to this due to the nature of Mike's job and that it is very important to him to preserve the wilderness. In Eternal on the Water, it was only part of the scenes and was not the main focal point of the story. There is a lot of history to the Maine wilderness and I like the fact that the author is familiar with this part of the area. The description of the bear was more like almost human like quality about it, more like a person than a wild animal that could kill. I love Paul's writing style, seems more like Richard Bach or Jimmy Buffett, partially fiction with a hint of non-fiction, he definitely did his homework on the ins & outs of Game Wardens.

Frequent Contributor
AIRKNITTER
Posts: 133
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

 

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?
EOTW and TPS could be set anywhere; even in a major metropolitan city. Both novels are about the interaction of the characters, imho.

 

What is the description of the bear like?

Having witnessed bears in Wisconsin and Canada I would sincerely say that the description is "beary beary".

 

 

 

Children are the living message we send to a time we will not see.