Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. On May 1, we’re saying goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Inspired Contributor
Ronrose
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎03-24-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I enjoy Mr.. Doiron's writing style very much. He has the ability to sweep us up with a minimum of words and place us down in the heart of Maine. Many writers overwhelm the reader with a deluge of words to try and bring their characters and settings to life. Mr. Doiron accomplishes a lot with a little. Perhaps it is that old New England Yankee trait.

 

Ron

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

VtCozy wrote:  Thanks for both of your posts Becktrek,kpatton,It happens,since the schedule was posted late,(I hope all is well Rachel)I have read on a bit..Lets just enjoy the book,and maybe a Thread will be created for  Readers who have finished "The Poachers Son"..Best  Vtc  Susan
Becktrek wrote:

I haven't read through all of the posts yet and apologize if someone already let you know this.  Please be careful about SPOILERS.  Many of us keep to the reading schedule.  Kathy

 

Kathy, I re-read my post a few times before I posted it and I am really sorry if I posted a spoiler - was it my comment about the bear?  I didn't mean to give anything away and I am sorry if I ruined something for you.

 

I was really glad i had finished the book before i read another post on one of the other discussion topics - spoiled the whole ending.  I think it may have been removed now..

 

Anyway, just wanted to say sorry about that - i had no idea there would be a schedule at all and had the whole book read 2 days after it arrived...  Next time I'll know to wait...

 

Becky in IN


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Distinguished Wordsmith
MSaff
Posts: 272
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

 

I agree  LOL



becke_davis wrote:

Msaff - I've never seen a moose up close and personal, but I have seen black bears in the wild. This one sounded a lot scarier than the ones I saw, but I think I'll stay a safe distance from both!


 

 

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Very good points here.

Resident view versus tourist view.

The book from Mike's point of view, I agree.

pen21

 

 


sailorreader wrote:

 

I felt that the first book we read set in Maine was written from a "tourist" point of view.  I had the feeling that the Poacher's Son was written by a "resident" of the state, not someone new to the area.

 

My husband and I said at Pierce Pond Camp, Maine, a few years ago.  The description  of the Camp, the woods, the back roads, the bar/restaurant was just as I remembered our visit. 

 

At the time of our visit, big companies taking back the woods was a concern just like Paul Doeron described in this book.

 

I felt as though the writing style was like reading someone's thoughts.  Not a "story line" but instead I felt as though I was living life with Mike as he went about his job and later his investigation. 

 


 

 

Inspired Contributor
debbaker
Posts: 151
Registered: ‎12-02-2006

Re: The Great Outdoors

In EOTW the Maine wilderness was represented more through the water than the forest. Here the focus is leaning towards the wild elements of the wilderness. It is dangerous without respect. But in that danger is beauty. It will definitely be a major character in this book.

 

The bear here is playful but dangerous if not respected. Perhaps the bear foreshadows Paul's father whom we haven't really met. He is playful but dangerous when he goes on the defensive?

 

Paul's writing style is more direct than Monninger's was. This is fitting for the type of stories both authors wrote. Monninger's story was about the poetry and celebration of a life cut short so his writing was more flowing-like the river. Doiron's writing emulates the wilderness--the constant subtle movements and changes. Other books discussed in other FL's previous were very different from this book. They were more lyrical but the tone of the books was also different.

 

Doiron captures the wildness of the situation for  Mike-his temperamental relationship with his dad, the murder of someone he knows, the mysterious phone call from his father, and finally finding out that his father is a suspect. Direct writing works with this character and he is the one telling the story.

Deb
booknook516.blogspot.com

simplicity of character is the natural result of profound thought
william hazlitt
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Hey, vtc: good hearing from you. The blue ridge mountains have got a lot of snow. Mt. Mitchell has 58" of snow as of last week. They've had a tough winter in the Blue Ridge but the skiing is great from what I hear. Charlotte has had snow but not much. Matter of fact, we had a snowstorm all day yesterday and not much accumulated as it had been warm in the past two days. Typical weather for the Southeast. Did you get any snow, finally?

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Inspired Contributor
debbaker
Posts: 151
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors


maxcat wrote:

Hey, vtc: good hearing from you. The blue ridge mountains have got a lot of snow. Mt. Mitchell has 58" of snow as of last week. They've had a tough winter in the Blue Ridge but the skiing is great from what I hear. Charlotte has had snow but not much. Matter of fact, we had a snowstorm all day yesterday and not much accumulated as it had been warm in the past two days. Typical weather for the Southeast. Did you get any snow, finally?


 

I spoke to my sister this morning--she still leaves in Hendersonville, NC--and she was telling me about the snow. I remember the snow we got there as a kid growing up on the side of the mountain. Mountain snow is beautiful. Doesn't seem like you all got as much as we did in southern NJ this year. I blame my niece, who prayed for snow before she came to visit me in December. Within a week of her arrival we got the first two feet of snow. We have had two more major storms in February and a couple of no big deal snow storms since that time. I visited there in Oct/Nov this past fall. High School reunion and all. Too many years. But I still love the south. One of my friends lives somewhere around Charlotte.

Deb
booknook516.blogspot.com

simplicity of character is the natural result of profound thought
william hazlitt
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Hey, vtc, I would be interested in the book you mentioned. I like Dorthea Benton Franks' books about the Carolinas beaches. When will this book be published?

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I lived up in Philadelphia for 19 years as a kid/teenager. The snows we had were big, such as 17' or so. We never had the snows like you're experiencing. I talked to my aunt who lives in Ridley Park, a burb of Philadelphia in between two storms. She had 28" the first storm and they were predicting another 2 feet that night. Felt sorry for her as she is 90 but is sharp as a tack and gets around but certainly couldn't do the shoveling. She hired the kid next door to shovel her sidewalk and driveway.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

 


How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 


 

Paul Doiron's writing style is very similar to Joe Monninger's Eternal on the Water in that the words flow smoothly as the stories unfold.  Both describe the outdoor setting as such that the outdoors becomes one of the major characters that is vital to the story.  In EOTW, the water, birds, animals and the land are as important as Mary and Cobb, whereas the purpose of the woods in The Poucher's Son is meant to portray something more menacing but still vital to the story.  Shandi Mitchell in Under This Unbroken Sky used Mother Nature, the sky and the clouds with their infinite colors, the coyotes and the ever important knarled tree trunk, to set the stage for her novel.  Sarah Blake in The Postmistress took a different approach.  The first third and the last third of her novel was written very passively whereas the middle of the story was where all the action was.  But no matter what the style of writing and how the authors expressed themselves, all of the above-mentioned books are excellent reads.

 

 

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

 


 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? 

For some reason, reading this book brings to mind John Hart's Down River. Different setting, and this book isn't nearly as dark, but in some ways I feel a similarity. I'm having an easier time reading The Poacher's Son.

 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

The Language of Sand  
maxcat wrote:

Hey, vtc, I would be interested in the book you mentioned. I like Dorthea Benton Franks' books about the Carolinas beaches. When will this book be published?


VtCozy wrote: Hi..I love "Dot Franks" books as well,her last one Return to Sullivans Island was good,but was published too long after Sullivans Island..So I had to re read the first..This book will be released late March,early April I believe.Like "The Poachers Son"..The landscape is for now and of course the characters,are so important..I think you will really enjoy it.As Becke and dhaupt have pointed out,in reference to "Sullivans Island..sometimes for me,I lose the momentum of the book when a follow up is published so many years later..I know you will like "The Language of Sand"..On Chapter 15 of "The Poachers Son".I can't stop reading it,its so good!!..How about you?.Glad all is well and lots of snow on the Mountains..Vtc Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Contributor
Susan5847
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I think that the Maine woods are going to be a major part of the novel.  The woods represent the only place that Mike's life and his Dad's life connect.  The woods show the major differences in their attitudes toward life -- Mike revers nature and understands his place in it - his dad is opposed to nature and spends his life trying the destroy it.  I think that this difference will play as major role as the novel progresses.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

Mike revers nature and understands his place in it - his dad is opposed to nature and spends his life trying the destroy it.

 

I haven't read the text as presenting that clear cut of a dichotomy.

 

 


Susan5847 wrote:

I think that the Maine woods are going to be a major part of the novel.  The woods represent the only place that Mike's life and his Dad's life connect.  The woods show the major differences in their attitudes toward life -- Mike revers nature and understands his place in it - his dad is opposed to nature and spends his life trying the destroy it.  I think that this difference will play as major role as the novel progresses.


 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I felt that the first book we read set in Maine was written from a "tourist" point of view.

 

Sailorreader -- I presume you are referring to Eternal on the Water.  Do you think Monniger (the author) would agree with you?

 

(I do agree there are two different viewpoints towards the wilderness areas of Maine, but I would not have called EOTW a "tourist" pov, although I don't know what name I would give to it.)

 

Pepper

 

 


sailorreader wrote:

 

I felt that the first book we read set in Maine was written from a "tourist" point of view.  I had the feeling that the Poacher's Son was written by a "resident" of the state, not someone new to the area.

 

My husband and I said at Pierce Pond Camp, Maine, a few years ago.  The description  of the Camp, the woods, the back roads, the bar/restaurant was just as I remembered our visit. 

 

At the time of our visit, big companies taking back the woods was a concern just like Paul Doeron described in this book.

 

I felt as though the writing style was like reading someone's thoughts.  Not a "story line" but instead I felt as though I was living life with Mike as he went about his job and later his investigation. 


 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors


VtCozy Wrote : If you read Joseph Monninger's (*Eternal on the Water)background.,you will learn that he has lived and has guided many people through New Hampshire,and New England..He also ran 'Sled Dogs as well,so his account of Maine and NH,were far from being from a "Tourist's point of View" He was exploring the "Allergash" in EOTW,but has in his lifetime been an avid outdoorsman along with his family.EOTW for me was just a different sort of book,but written from The Heart of A New Englander...VTC
Peppermill wrote:

I felt that the first book we read set in Maine was written from a "tourist" point of view.

 

Sailorreader -- I presume you are referring to Eternal on the Water.  Do you think Monniger (the author) would agree with you?

 

(I do agree there are two different viewpoints towards the wilderness areas of Maine, but I would not have called EOTW a "tourist" pov, although I don't know what name I would give to it.)

 

Pepper

 

 


sailorreader wrote:

 

I felt that the first book we read set in Maine was written from a "tourist" point of view.  I had the feeling that the Poacher's Son was written by a "resident" of the state, not someone new to the area.

 

My husband and I said at Pierce Pond Camp, Maine, a few years ago.  The description  of the Camp, the woods, the back roads, the bar/restaurant was just as I remembered our visit. 

 

At the time of our visit, big companies taking back the woods was a concern just like Paul Doeron described in this book.

 

I felt as though the writing style was like reading someone's thoughts.  Not a "story line" but instead I felt as though I was living life with Mike as he went about his job and later his investigation. 


 

 


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

You're catching up, I'm on Chapter 20. I'll look for The Language of Sand in the bookstore later this month, thanks.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors


maxcat wrote:

You're catching up, I'm on Chapter 20. I'll look for The Language of Sand in the bookstore later this month, thanks.


 

VtCozy wrote..Soon they have to put up a thread "You Bailed out and read the Whole Novel..its so good..You are welcome..

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Contributor
CK2750
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

I love the descriptions of the Maine "wilderness".  This is a state I want to visit, but have not yet gotten to.

 

Doiron's writing feels like a conversation...I feel I could be standing nest to him, waiting to add a comment and be part of the action.


Rachel-K wrote:

 

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

What is the description of the bear like?

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 


 

 

Inspired Correspondent
jb70
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎07-06-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Great Outdoors

LindaEducation wrote:

The bear was a big hungry formidable animal that swooped up Pork Chop the pig with little effort.  It was really so sad though, and i felt for the pig owner. 

 

I learned more of what a Game Warden is. I didnt realize all they do.  Loving the wildnerness and wanting to find out more, I find myself really drawn to the book, and have read a little more than is scheduled.  Paul's writing makes me feel like I am right there, and working right along side with Mike.

 

 

I don't know if it ever crossed my mind that Game Wardens were trained as Police Officers, it makes sense but I had never made that connection before.  I love learning new facts imbedded in fiction, makes them so much more memorable too!

http://bookbookseverywhere.blogspot.com/