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Anna_Louise
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎06-17-2009

Re: The Great Outdoors

In EOTW, water represented a big part of the wilderness while in The Poacher's Son, the woods are represented.  In EOTW, the wilderness was a safe haven for everyone while in the Poacher's Son, the woods are represented to be a wild, unsafe haven.  I like the stark contrast in both the books representing one state.  It reminds me how different you can be living in the same state.

 

I loved the bear as well as again it represents a wilderness depending on who is telling the part of the bear.  I think that Mike loved the wildness and free spirit in the bear and wanted to be a little like him...roaming free, taking what he wants to survive and enjoying life!

 

Anna Louise

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: The Great Outdoors

I remember the air looking crystallized when I lived in Minnesota. I was told it was because the water molecules in the air were frozen. Minnesota was cold but the people were wonderful and hearty. They learned how to work around it and live well with it. The first year I lived there, it snowed in September. I don't think we saw the ground again until April.

 

Peppermill wrote:

It does vary on where in the Midwest.  My experience was further from the Great Lakes and more reflective of the semi-arid conditions of the Plains, so there was a lot less humidity on those hot summer days with all those towering thunderheads forming in the afternoons.

 

Even in Vermont, where the snow was deep and the winters long, the cold did not seem as severe, however. When I moved to the mid-Atlantic area and people around me were complaining about the cold weather, I usually laughed, then they would say, but you didn't have the humidity.  I still laughed.  Minnesota et al is COLD in the winter, at least most years.

trschi wrote:

I grew up in Chicago and live in New England now.  The Midwest summers were hotter and more intense (100+ days with 90%+ humidity for days on end!) than out here, though we still have our fair share of hot and humid days.  You certainly have those sweat-inducing days, though within a couple of days the weather may change and it become downright chilly! To answer your question - normal, yes, as long as it doesn't last too long!

becke_davis wrote:

I always think of Maine as cold, so it's kind of thrown me off with the references to heat. Not just average heat, but serious, sweat-inducing heat. Then I remembered the last time I spent any time in Massachusetts it was in the mid-90s the whole time I was there. Is this normal for summers in New England? I'm a Midwesterner, where we're used to frying eggs on the sidewalk in summer.

 

 

 

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inkslngr
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-05-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

This book is very different for me.  In the last book I saw a very beautiful setting.  In this one I see some parts as run down and shabby and not a place I would like to spend very much time.  I am not snobby but, the area to me is not inviting.  I think it is because of the characters that are drunk and the crimes that are being committed.

 

What is the description of the bear like?

 

I didn't think of the bear as threatening when he was playing with the Thighmaster and just getting into mischief.  It made me mad when I realized that he was baited.  It was a shame that a beautiful animal had to be put down due to someone's irresponsibility

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 

Paul writes a good narrative.  It is easily followed and you don't have to look back to figure what is going on.  He has a way of making you care what is happening to the main character.  His voice is similar to Eternal on the Water in that respect. 

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Sheltiemama
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎06-01-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

The bear is menacing.

 

One thing I really like is the author making the towns that were flooded (in the real world) come back to life (in the novel's world). This was done decades ago in East Tennessee, where I live, and there are still hard feelings about it.

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Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

pen21 wrote:

Becke,

Good description, you said "I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story." I agree with you. It did feel like a character.

pen21

 

 


becke_davis wrote:

From what I hear, moose are more common than the black bears in Maine. But even though moose are huge and would be scary to run into, they don't convey a sense of danger the same as the bear did.

 

I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story. Lots of states have desolate wooded areas, but I get the distinct "feel" of Maine in the story. I don't know if this will change later, but up to this point I'm glad the Maine dialect has been kept to a minimum. I always find that distracting.


 

I agree - the woods are very much like a character in the story. I also am glad that the Maine dialect has been kept to a minimum.

 

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JillinOH
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎12-06-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Even though the settings of both Eternal on the Water and The Poacher's Son are very similar, the style of the authors' writing and the plot so far present the wilderness setting in very different ways. In Eternal on the Water, the wilderness was more meaningful due to the connection to life and death. In the Poacher's Son, the humorous references (a pig named Pork Chop, Thighmaster, description of the pig owner) as well as the almost rebellious nature of the main character make the wilderness setting less serious. This is my impression so far. I am really enjoying the book and didn't want to stop reading.

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lovetoreadLW
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎12-01-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

I was raised in flat Florida and have never been to New England so I am really enjoying the scenic descriptions of the state of Maine. I felt like I was walking through the woods with Mike, looking for that pig!

 

I have seen both grizzlies and black bears in the Smoky Mountains and in Canada, but from inside a vehicle. I would be terrified if one was trying to get inside my house! I think I would start tossing food as far out a window as I could while calling 911.

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Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Vtc Wrote..It seems here in Vermont ,that our winters are not as cold,but cold enough..If that makes sense..As long as we get snow ,we are happy...I do recall,years before I moved here,it was colder,but thats was due to not living here and getting used to the temperature change from New York City....Maine..must mention that now that we are reading  TPS,I want to go..In the Spring....If I could I would bring all of you..Susan


thewanderingjew wrote:

I remember the air looking crystallized when I lived in Minnesota. I was told it was because the water molecules in the air were frozen. Minnesota was cold but the people were wonderful and hearty. They learned how to work around it and live well with it. The first year I lived there, it snowed in September. I don't think we saw the ground again until April.

 

Peppermill wrote:

It does vary on where in the Midwest.  My experience was further from the Great Lakes and more reflective of the semi-arid conditions of the Plains, so there was a lot less humidity on those hot summer days with all those towering thunderheads forming in the afternoons.

 

Even in Vermont, where the snow was deep and the winters long, the cold did not seem as severe, however. When I moved to the mid-Atlantic area and people around me were complaining about the cold weather, I usually laughed, then they would say, but you didn't have the humidity.  I still laughed.  Minnesota et al is COLD in the winter, at least most years.

trschi wrote:

I grew up in Chicago and live in New England now.  The Midwest summers were hotter and more intense (100+ days with 90%+ humidity for days on end!) than out here, though we still have our fair share of hot and humid days.  You certainly have those sweat-inducing days, though within a couple of days the weather may change and it become downright chilly! To answer your question - normal, yes, as long as it doesn't last too long!

becke_davis wrote:

I always think of Maine as cold, so it's kind of thrown me off with the references to heat. Not just average heat, but serious, sweat-inducing heat. Then I remembered the last time I spent any time in Massachusetts it was in the mid-90s the whole time I was there. Is this normal for summers in New England? I'm a Midwesterner, where we're used to frying eggs on the sidewalk in summer.

 

 

 

 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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hmorales
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-26-2010
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Re: The Great Outdoors

[ Edited ]

I really enjoy the way the wilderness is used in this story. For most of the book, I felt as though I was in the forest. The descriptions are so lifelike. The way he used hunters tricks to elude the poice is a true sign of a woodsmen.

 

The writing style is descriptive, but direct. The ideas were clear, and I could picture it in my head as I read. In fact, I was kinda looking over my shoulder for a bear for quite awhile as I read! 

 

The bear was described as meduim, 200 lbs. beyond that, bowditch seemed to have respect for the bear, as if it was just as much his home in the wilderness as those who had built homes.

 

 

 

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nymazz
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎09-14-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

In Mr. Doirons story the wilderness takes on a more foreboding aspect, it adds to the suspense,  which works just fine for a mystery.

In EOTW, the wilderness and the water represented life and its many challenges and changes. 

 

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

This is only my second FL book, but I am enjoying his writing style, he is descriptive but not overly wordy which I like.  Very to the point, the reading flows.

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are. -Mason Cooley-
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jb70
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎07-06-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Peppermill wrote:

 

jb70 wrote:

I don't know if it ever crossed my mind that Game Wardens were trained as Police Officers, it makes sense but I had never made that connection before.  I love learning new facts imbedded in fiction, makes them so much more memorable too! {Bold added.}

The responsibilities of a game warden as a police officer are part of what troubled me in EOTW about the protagonist telling his story to the game warden.   Just what were the oaths of office she had taken?  Could she reasonably remain silent to the story she had heard?

 

 

 

I hadn't thought about that with EOTW.  I just kind of thought of that officer as a kind stranger.

http://bookbookseverywhere.blogspot.com/
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CharlieG31
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎01-06-2010
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Re: The Great Outdoors

How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

From my point of view the Maine wilderness plays a role in the character because it shows us a connection between the wild and Mike. As Mike starts to wonder around in the wild or talks about the wild we also learn a lot about Mikes life which clearly shows that the wilderness is also a very important part of Mikes life and has always been there for him.

 

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style?

Paul Doirons writing style is in a way direct and brief however in small sentences he achieves to describe a whole environment and a whole situation which for me is impressive to in such small paragraphs describe a whole situation .

 

"The questions are more essential than the answers."
Karl Theodor Jaspers

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BrittanyE
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎01-09-2010
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Re: The Great Outdoors

The Maine wilderness is definitely like a character in this story. It is wild and unknown, and yet loved by those who live in it. It is both familiar and unexpected. It is the setting for each event, but more than just a location it adds complications and depth to the scenes.

 

I enjoyed the writing style in that i felt familiar with the main character. Like i knew him, and understood how he saw the world. I believed the things he did, the guilt and innocence of those around him. I couldn't objectively read it and solve the crime, i felt what he did, and was therefore led to believe what he did.

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zenrei
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎02-03-2010
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Re: The Great Outdoors

[ Edited ]

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

I think it gives nature a character role as well, the weather, the terrain, the fact that it isolates the people that live there, sometimes giving them personalities you wouldn't find in main-stream america, more quaint-like, something that should be preserved because it's becoming endangered


What is the description of the bear like?

 

He sounded HUGE and smart and desperate to me... hungry enough to steal a pig, but smart enough to avoid the bear trap set by Kathy


How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading? 

 

I like it.  He beefs up the characters through behavior, instead of just dialog, the same way I would judge someone from their body language in real life, especially if I didn't know them.

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

What is the description of the bear like?

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 

I like it.  He seems to describe body lanuage really well, and doesn't rely on pure dialog to build a character, like I would do in real life with people I don't know.  I felt like I was eavesdropping on them sometimes.  I also liked the descriptions of everything, I could almost picture it.

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Sally_K
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-01-2010

Re: The Great Outdoors

I did not grow up in Maine, but my family has spent many summer days on the rocky coastline, I have skiied its winter slopes, and I have watched the sunrise on top of Cadillac Mtn in Arcadia National Park.  And, like Mike, I attended one of Maine's notable liberal arts colleges.  It was interesting to read the author's portrayal of the Maine Wilderness and its natives. While thinking about the role the Maine wilderness in this story, a billboard just after you enter Maine from NH comes to mind.  It reads, "Maine - the way life should be."  I cannot tell you how many times I have driven by this sign, but each time, it makes me contemplate what the statement is saying. Does Mike believe and live by this motto?   We will have to wait and see.  I see the wilderness as a supporting character with similar and different relationships to each of the major players in the novel.

 

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bookowlie
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎04-15-2008
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Re: The Great Outdoors

[ Edited ]

Very insightful post about Maine and the characters' different relationship with nature.

 

** Note:  Editing this to include that I was commenting on Ssizemore's 3/1 posting.

 

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: The Great Outdoors

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style?

 

I find that reading this book feels more like I am watching it as a movie. I feel almost like a voyeur. The style is very conversational and the tale so fast moving that I feel as if I  am a character on the sidelines. I am really enjoying it and I can't wait to post on Monday so I can move on to the next section to be read. One more day...this is a hard one to read with the group but I am trying my darnedest! :smileyhappy:

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CharlieG31
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎01-06-2010

Re: The Great Outdoors

I agree with you and I also consider that when you are reading the book you feel the woods, and you get the chance to see the animals and even sometimes I swear I have felt cold lol . Whenever Mike goes back to when he was young and narrates a part of his life I feel as if I was behind him seeing what he is doing and following them which is why this book is so good. I believe that one of the hardest thing to have success at are descriptions and Paul seems to achieve this because from the moment you start reading you feel as if youre in the woods with Mike or at the police station or wherever Mike is the way Paul uses words makes it easy for the reader to imagine the location and not only imagine it but to feel like he's actually there!

"The questions are more essential than the answers."
Karl Theodor Jaspers

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lyricasgift
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Registered: ‎02-03-2010
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Re: The Great Outdoors

  I felt like i was right there in Maine with the bear.

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merl
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Registered: ‎12-03-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Same as above. The book EOTW had the Maine wilderness and the bear. Both were different with one bear all happy and the other bear being the wild animal and killing. Both books were great in describing the outdoors like you were really there. The Poachers Son was a good page turner and a good story.