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maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

That article about the prison camp is interesting. I wonder if the POW camp mentioned in the book will become a focal point in this book?

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Great Outdoors

[ Edited ]

From what I hear, moose are more common than the black bears in Maine. But even though moose are huge and would be scary to run into, they don't convey a sense of danger the same as the bear did.

 

I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story. Lots of states have desolate wooded areas, but I get the distinct "feel" of Maine in the story. I don't know if this will change later, but up to this point I'm glad the Maine dialect has been kept to a minimum. I always find that distracting.

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pen21
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Becke,

Good description, you said "I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story." I agree with you. It did feel like a character.

pen21

 

 


becke_davis wrote:

From what I hear, moose are more common than the black bears in Maine. But even though moose are huge and would be scary to run into, they don't convey a sense of danger the same as the bear did.

 

I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story. Lots of states have desolate wooded areas, but I get the distinct "feel" of Maine in the story. I don't know if this will change later, but up to this point I'm glad the Maine dialect has been kept to a minimum. I always find that distracting.


 

 

Wordsmith
BookWoman718
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎01-28-2007

Re: The Great Outdoors

The Maine woods are beautifully described in both books;  the reader can really “see” what surrounds the characters.  But the sense of the woods is quite different in several respects.  I agree with those who  feel that EOTW gave us a woods of peace, healing, and tranquility, while Poacher’s Son gives us a setting that is equally beautiful, but also dangerous, not only from natural causes but as a refuge for questionable characters, and a place of frequent crime, sometimes violent.   While no one inhabiting the Maine woods in EOTW had anything but an intelligent and friendly nature, many of the characters we meet in PS are dark, in a variety of ways. In this book we see that not all ‘rednecks’ are confined to the backwoods South, a fact that rings true to me.  That stereotype is actually to be found in many far-flung and seemingly unlikely locations.

 

I’ve really enjoyed the insight into what constitutes a Game Warden’s job.  I guess I haven’t lived in places where Game Wardens were a typical part of law enforcement.   The stress that the job places on relationships mirrors what we often see among police officers in more urban settings

 

The lovable “Teddy” type bears of EOTW are replaced here by ravagers of livestock who may actually become home invaders over a panfull  of bacon.   Mike, of course, doesn’t want to have to destroy any beautiful creature of nature;  an important part of his job and his personal ethic is to protect them, but he is nevertheless prepared to do whatever has to be done, without sentimentality.   Totally unlike the romantic notions of EOTW.  

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reader76
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎02-05-2009
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Re: The Great Outdoors

I have not read similar novel set in the outdoor territory like Paul Doiron's The Poacher's Son.  I agree with some of the posts that Maine's wilderness is described as uncharted territory where dangers can possibly exist. 

The main character in this story Bowditch, like his father seems to be prefer this wilderness to people.  They are both isolated characters who says little and observes alot.  They have both failed in their marriages and almost seem apathetic to his situation.  He does not miss the companionship of another human being but not entirely. 

The bear was described as a menacing monstrocity which invaded the line between humans and Maine's wilderness which brings a feeling of discomfort and fear in others. 

I think Paul Doiron's writing style is simple and realistic which captures the comparison and similarities between men and nature. 

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JaneM
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Registered: ‎02-01-2008
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Re: The Great Outdoors


AIRKNITTER wrote:
 

What is the description of the bear like?

Having witnessed bears in Wisconsin and Canada I would sincerely say that the description is "beary beary".

 


Oh, groan to your pun!  :smileyhappy:

 

I like thinking of the outdoors as a character, although it is really a setting.  But if you combine all the elements that we have read about so far, from bears to deep shadows, drippy trees, moss and leaves underfoot, and miles and miles of unexplored territory, it adds up a totality that could be very threatening, repressive, or enveloping, depending on your perspective.

 

Jane M.
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Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: The Great Outdoors

VtCozy Wrote I agree..Maine is so full of 'Character",just being Maine that it takes on a whole persona of it own..Crucial to the book..Its the Spirit of independence that always stands out in Maine,NH,and VT...(I have a love affair with New England,so pardon the distraction)First time with Becke with a FirstLook..Welcome!!
pen21 wrote:

Becke,

Good description, you said "I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story." I agree with you. It did feel like a character.

pen21

 

 


becke_davis wrote:

From what I hear, moose are more common than the black bears in Maine. But even though moose are huge and would be scary to run into, they don't convey a sense of danger the same as the bear did.

 

I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story. Lots of states have desolate wooded areas, but I get the distinct "feel" of Maine in the story. I don't know if this will change later, but up to this point I'm glad the Maine dialect has been kept to a minimum. I always find that distracting.


 

 


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: The Great Outdoors

Hi maxcat..Good to see you here..I know you are enjoying "The Poachers Son"..How are your Blue Ridge Mts?..I am reading a book soon to be released "The language of  Sand"Author Ellen Block..Takes place on the NC Coastline near Nags Head..Its a bit quirky and lots of characters,just thought you might like it...Hope all is well Vtc...Susan
maxcat wrote:

That article about the prison camp is interesting. I wonder if the POW camp mentioned in the book will become a focal point in this book?


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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MSaff
Posts: 272
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Great Outdoors

Hi Everyone,

 

  I am really enjoying this novel as I hope all of you are.  Here are my comments on the Great Outdoors.

 

    As with the last novel, the wilderness or great outdoors is a vital part of the novel.  It is it's own character and without this character there would be no story line to this point.  My own opinion is that this area is also in northern Maine, but we are looking at it in another way.  (That being from the point of those who protect the wild and those who intrude upon that wild. 

  Now for the description of the bear.  As we see, there are varying descriptions, dependent upon who you are listening to at any given point in time.  I see this as like the description of a thief when a witness is questioned by the police,  Mike is having to take the descriptions and actions described and try to figure out exactly what is going on and also he must make sure he traps the correct culprit.  I wouldn't want to see and innocent bear trapped. 

  I look forward to reading on to find out what other antics both the warden and the bear encounter. 

 

  To me, Paul Doriron's writing style pulls you into the story almost from the the start.  He has a unique way of weaving a number of different story lines into one another and yet he does not detract from the basic story.  He gives us hints about what has happened but I can see a number of different ways the mystery is going to play out.  Again, I look forward to reading on to learn more. 

 

 

 

 


Rachel-K wrote:

 

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

What is the description of the bear like?

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 


 

 

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
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Bonnie_C
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Re: The Great Outdoors


becke_davis wrote:

From what I hear, moose are more common than the black bears in Maine. But even though moose are huge and would be scary to run into, they don't convey a sense of danger the same as the bear did.

 


Hi Becke,

My family took one of our vacations in Alaska where they too have an abundance of bear and moose.  We were told that in the worse case scenario that you could play dead in case of a bear encounter (I probably would not have to play).  But if we encountered a moose the best defense is just to RUN!

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sailorreader
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎02-08-2008

Re: The Great Outdoors

 

I felt that the first book we read set in Maine was written from a "tourist" point of view.  I had the feeling that the Poacher's Son was written by a "resident" of the state, not someone new to the area.

 

My husband and I said at Pierce Pond Camp, Maine, a few years ago.  The description  of the Camp, the woods, the back roads, the bar/restaurant was just as I remembered our visit. 

 

At the time of our visit, big companies taking back the woods was a concern just like Paul Doeron described in this book.

 

I felt as though the writing style was like reading someone's thoughts.  Not a "story line" but instead I felt as though I was living life with Mike as he went about his job and later his investigation. 

 

sailorreader
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kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

 

The description of Maine for me makes me see in my mind remoteness.  People who are choosing to live away from civilization.  People who want to live their lives and be left alone.  Because the outdoors is described as rugged it allows for the characters to also be rugged, not as concerned with typical social rules.  I'm going to keep thinking about the other questions.  The setting immediately had an impact on me as a reader. Kathy

Rachel-K wrote:

 

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

 


 

 

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kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

 

I'm only starting to post and read.  I really thought in Poacher's Son it depended on whose perspective you took in how they viewed the land.  The big land owners were certainly looking for gain and their own use.  I however, saw the people who had the land leases as people who wanted to preserve the land as it was and based on the murder, were willing to fight to keep what they had.  Kathy

jbg78 wrote:

Role of the wilderness

 

In Poacher's Son the land was something you protected or fought for your own use and gain, while in Eternal you became one with the land wanting to preserve it for everyone to enjoy.


 

 

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kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

 

I haven't read through all of the posts yet and apologize if someone already let you know this.  Please be careful about SPOILERS.  Many of us keep to the reading schedule.  Kathy

Becktrek wrote:

This is my first FL book, so I can't compare it to your other selection, "Eternal on the Water", however I loved the imagery of "Poacher", i could feel myself in the wilderness and came to feel very protective of it as well.  The actions of the new paper company were very upsetting to me and I really identified with the hostile feelings of the inhabitants of that region.

 

I loved the description of the bear and it's actions.  I was distressed by the eventual outcome, and did wonder what had made it act the way it did.

 

Paul has a very descriptive writing style.  It was easy to follow and as I said above I was able to put myself IN the space he was writing about.

 

Really enjoyed this book!

 

Becky in IN


 

 

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kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

 

Ok.  As I've been reading posts and enjoying all of your thoughts and comments, it is causing my mind to really think about these questions.  I did read EOTW.  I'm thinking that a huge difference in the two settings is that in EOTW the wilderness was a place where people went for vacations, for rest and reflection.  In the Poacher's Son the setting is where people live.  This is their day to day life.
Now when I think of the bear, I am drawing the same analogies.  The bear in EOTW was part of a fantasy and legend.  This bear is the real thing.  Something to understand, fear and respect.
Kathy

Rachel-K wrote:

 

Our group recently read another very different novel set in the outdoors in similar territory. How does the Maine wilderness play a role or take on character in this story?

 

What is the description of the bear like?

 

How would you describe Paul Doiron's writing style? If you've been with First Look for some time, is his writing voice different from other novel's we've been reading?

 


 

 

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: The Great Outdoors

What is it like at a camp like the one you stayed at? What are the accomodations like? Are they cabins? Is it a fishing or a hunting camp?
sailorreader wrote:

 

I felt that the first book we read set in Maine was written from a "tourist" point of view.  I had the feeling that the Poacher's Son was written by a "resident" of the state, not someone new to the area.

 

My husband and I said at Pierce Pond Camp, Maine, a few years ago.  The description  of the Camp, the woods, the back roads, the bar/restaurant was just as I remembered our visit. 

 

At the time of our visit, big companies taking back the woods was a concern just like Paul Doeron described in this book.

 

I felt as though the writing style was like reading someone's thoughts.  Not a "story line" but instead I felt as though I was living life with Mike as he went about his job and later his investigation. 

 


 

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MSaff
Posts: 272
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

 

Hi becke,
  I just finished reading your post, and it interested me.  I have run into moose while hiking and they are indeed more of a danger than bear.  A moose will charge and attack without a moments notice whereas a bear will usually run in the opposite direction.  If you scream at the bear or make a loud noise, the bear will immediately run away.  ( That is of course if the bear is in a normal state of mind).   Moose on the other hand can be several hundred feet away, and they will instinctively charge at whatever they perceive as a threat.


becke_davis wrote:

From what I hear, moose are more common than the black bears in Maine. But even though moose are huge and would be scary to run into, they don't convey a sense of danger the same as the bear did.

 

I like the way the author introduces us to the Maine woods as if it were a character in the story. Lots of states have desolate wooded areas, but I get the distinct "feel" of Maine in the story. I don't know if this will change later, but up to this point I'm glad the Maine dialect has been kept to a minimum. I always find that distracting.


 

 

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
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becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Great Outdoors

 


Bonnie_C wrote:

becke_davis wrote:

From what I hear, moose are more common than the black bears in Maine. But even though moose are huge and would be scary to run into, they don't convey a sense of danger the same as the bear did.

 


Hi Becke,

My family took one of our vacations in Alaska where they too have an abundance of bear and moose.  We were told that in the worse case scenario that you could play dead in case of a bear encounter (I probably would not have to play).  But if we encountered a moose the best defense is just to RUN!

Bonnie - my brother does soil surveys, and he was assigned to work in the Maine woods awhile back. He is an outdoorsman and he's used to working alone, but he totally freaked out when he turned around and saw a GIANT moose standing behind him once. I can't think of Maine without remembering that!

 

 

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becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Great Outdoors

Msaff - I've never seen a moose up close and personal, but I have seen black bears in the wild. This one sounded a lot scarier than the ones I saw, but I think I'll stay a safe distance from both!

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Becktrek
Posts: 62
Registered: ‎02-01-2010
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Re: The Great Outdoors

I haven't read through all of the posts yet and apologize if someone already let you know this.  Please be careful about SPOILERS.  Many of us keep to the reading schedule.  Kathy

 

Kathy, I re-read my post a few times before I posted it and I am really sorry if I posted a spoiler - was it my comment about the bear?  I didn't mean to give anything away and I am sorry if I ruined something for you.

 

I was really glad i had finished the book before i read another post on one of the other discussion topics - spoiled the whole ending.  I think it may have been removed now..

 

Anyway, just wanted to say sorry about that - i had no idea there would be a schedule at all and had the whole book read 2 days after it arrived...  Next time I'll know to wait...

 

Becky in IN