Reply
Correspondent
T-Mo
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎08-31-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

 

I was very shocked at the outcome. Not only did I not think Jack was guilty but I didn’t think he was that terrible of a person. Throughout the discussion of the novel I did not connect at all with the others who felt Jack was despicable. Needless to say, when it came down to the revelation that he was the killer and then his deplorable actions towards Mike and Charlie, I was in complete disbelief. I was certainly on the edge of my seat for the whole last section of the book.

 

Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?

 

There is no doubt this is a manipulation tactic. Jack set Mike up to take action against Truman. Then he used Mike’s guilt and conscience to try to make him believe he was responsible and just as guilty as Jack for the crimes he committed. Jack was not only a terrible father in the end, but a horrible person as a whole.

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? 

 

Brenda was certainly a villain. She set Jack up to take a terrible fall. I just can’t believe he allowed himself to be so taken in by her. Obviously life would have been very different for so many people if she hadn’t been such a lying, cheating, disgrace of a human being.

 

How does Mike seem to change in these chapters, both before and after the violent ending with his father?

 

The most obvious change is the fact that he has come to realize just who his father really truly turned out to be, and that he never had any respect or concern for his own son. What a terrible thing to have to come to terms with. Not to mention that when he finally reaches out to his own mother to tell her it’s all over, she couldn’t care less about how he has fared throughout the whole ordeal. What a tragic and sad realization for a person so young to have to deal with. Thankfully, he has Charlie and Ora who he can turn to for guidance. 

Contributor
tdunham220
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-22-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Really enjoyed this book. Loved the setting and learning about the many hats a game warden wears. I must say I found myself very frustrated with Mike and the many poor decisions he made over the course of the book. I wanted to shake him!!! Guess that's a good sign that I was that involved in the book!

Frequent Contributor
ruthieWW
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎01-07-2010

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

 

The author very wisely led the reader through a maze of suspects, which kept us captivated. But personally, I was not shocked at the end. I still consider the BEAR at the beginning of the novel to be a key element. Mike's instinct was to save the bear from itself. His father Jack is so similiar to the wild bear, because Jack is a wild spirit, lives on the land and nature and basically does what is in his nature to do. When Mike set the trap for the bear, he definitely did not want the bear harmed and tried everything in his power to prevent any harm. But the farmer baited the bear; thereby forcing it to cross the barriers. When Jack is baited by Brenda and led along by his feelings for her; then when he is trapped, he lashes back like a wild and dangerous animal. So I was not shocked. I was really a little sad. If everyone had left him alone to live in the wild, Jack would have sustained himself happily. That is really what Mike wanted for him.

Correspondent
floreader
Posts: 95
Registered: ‎09-15-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

 

ruthieWW wrote:

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

 

The author very wisely led the reader through a maze of suspects, which kept us captivated. But personally, I was not shocked at the end. I still consider the BEAR at the beginning of the novel to be a key element. Mike's instinct was to save the bear from itself. His father Jack is so similiar to the wild bear, because Jack is a wild spirit, lives on the land and nature and basically does what is in his nature to do. When Mike set the trap for the bear, he definitely did not want the bear harmed and tried everything in his power to prevent any harm. But the farmer baited the bear; thereby forcing it to cross the barriers. When Jack is baited by Brenda and led along by his feelings for her; then when he is trapped, he lashes back like a wild and dangerous animal. So I was not shocked. I was really a little sad. If everyone had left him alone to live in the wild, Jack would have sustained himself happily. That is really what Mike wanted for him.

Wow, very interesting analysis.

Inspired Contributor
ilenekm
Posts: 71
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I also was surprised by the ending. I was really hoping that Mike would prove that Jack was innocent and that they would start building their relationship.  I was also shocked that Brenda was the villain and not a victim.  Perhaps she was a victim when she was younger and snapped and was bent on revenge after that. I began to suspect that she was not who she said when she wanted to go swimming with everything else going on.

 

I was expecting that the POW from the beginning of the story would resurface later and somehow play into the murders.  

 

All in all, I liked this book and would look for other books from this author in the future

Inspired Contributor
nymazz
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎09-14-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

The ending did not shock me, but I wasn't completely sure that I was correct in believing that Jack was a horrible person capable of murder, even though I felt Jack was guilty the ending was very exciting, with many surprises.

 

Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?

Total manipulation by Jack, proving even further how cold hearted he truly was.  I think

Mike handle it well under the circumstances.

 

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? 

When she was younger, when Mike met her, she was a victim of her father and they way he treated her, but as a young adult, she could have made other choices, victim turned to villain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are. -Mason Cooley-
Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Great thoughts.  =)

ruthieWW wrote:

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

 

The author very wisely led the reader through a maze of suspects, which kept us captivated. But personally, I was not shocked at the end. I still consider the BEAR at the beginning of the novel to be a key element. Mike's instinct was to save the bear from itself. His father Jack is so similiar to the wild bear, because Jack is a wild spirit, lives on the land and nature and basically does what is in his nature to do. When Mike set the trap for the bear, he definitely did not want the bear harmed and tried everything in his power to prevent any harm. But the farmer baited the bear; thereby forcing it to cross the barriers. When Jack is baited by Brenda and led along by his feelings for her; then when he is trapped, he lashes back like a wild and dangerous animal. So I was not shocked. I was really a little sad. If everyone had left him alone to live in the wild, Jack would have sustained himself happily. That is really what Mike wanted for him.

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Frequent Contributor
wjbauer
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎12-02-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

*********************************************************************************************************************

I was very shocked, I thought for sure that it was Charley. But then Brenda entered the picture with her meanness I was surprised. I thought she might be in love with Mike. But then... Dad did it. What a great ending. I never thought Jack would be so mean to his son. I am sure he would have killed him

 

Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?

********************************************************************************************************************

I believe that Jack was manipulating Mike to get him to help get him and Brenda away to Canada. But Mike was honest enough to tell the sheriff that he killed Truman.

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim?

***************************************************************************************************************
I think Brenda was a victim do to the bad treatment she receive when she was younger, But as she aged she turned to a villain in trying to get Jack to kill for her. At the last she was very mean to Mike. 

Do you have predictions for Mike's future?

*********************************************************************************************************************

 Hopefully he will regain his job, but I think he will have problems with Menario who still has doubts about Mike helping his father Jack.

 

Correspondent
JoanieGranola
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎11-11-2009

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

This story is different than most mysteries in that the antagonist was exactly who it was expected to be in the beginning of the story. The twists and turns in the story (when Mike started figuring things out) didn't happen until Chapter 26, which was when the eager anticipation for the ending came for me. I was a little shocked at the outcome, because throughout the entire story the author gave the impression that even though Mike didn't receive a whole lot of love from his father he had a good understanding of who he was as a man. It turns out that Mike's perception of his father all these years was entirely inaccurate.


Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?

The blackmailing, as Mike referred to it, was just a mind game that Jack was playing with his son. Unfortunately, Mike has two of the most selfish parents on the planet. Neither really care about him the way parents should care about their children. Mike handles it quite well - to be honest, I didn't think he would stand up to his father as he did. I thought that he would perhaps go into serious denial and help his father escape because he had sort of given up on his own life.

 

Do you get the impression that there were similarities in the relationships that Brenda Dean had with Jack, and Jack's relationship with Mike's mother?

After the character flaws became evident for Brenda, it certainly presented a clearer picture of Jack's realationship with each woman. And it was made all the more clear that the two relationships were mirror images after Mike notified his mother of his father's death. Both women loved this man to their core - I still can't figure out why - and, in his own way, he love both of them as much. Why he reacted the way he did after Brenda died is still confusing to me - I think perhaps he wasn't so much mourning the loss of Brenda as the loss of both his first wife AND Brenda. Since his ex-wife had moved on with her life and now Brenda was dead, I think that's why he felt that life wasn't worth living. I do not believe that it was the loss of Brenda alone that caused him to kill himself.


Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim?

Brenda is in the most awkward stage - she's not a grown woman, yet she's not a child either. She uses both attitudes to her advantage to manipulate her situations. Brenda is very similar to both Jack and Mike's mother in that she's selfish and wants to get her own way. She will use her sexuality to manipulate men because she had a rough childhood (which would make it seem a tad justifiable, if not for her maniacal tantrums near the end), but when she was caught in her web of lies she had to somehow justify her actions by placing blame on others in order to show herself in a good light. When we first met BJ and then Brenda Dean, I did feel sorry for her. But once Charley and Mike took the last trip out to the cabin, I thought something was amiss and I really didn't like her. She turned out to be a villan in her own right.


How does Mike seem to change in these chapters, both before and after the violent ending with his father? Does your opinion of any of the other Wardens change as we learn how mislead Mike was in his quest to save his father?

Mike definitely grows in these chapters. Instead of blindly assuming his father's innocence and listening to the ramblings of a madwoman, he begins to doubt the things he believed to be true. He started to put things together, though not quickly, but ultimately he came to realize that things just didn't add up and there were questions that needed to be answered. Unfortunately, those answers came with a price. My opinions of the Wardens did not change throughout the book. We're all human beings and we all make mistakes. It's hard to be so close to a terrible situation and be able to see the forest for the trees. As Kathy stated, Mike was too close - he couldn't possibly be expected to have good judgment. I wish we could've heard what Officer Twombley wanted to say to Mike. It was nice that he didn't give him a hard time on the drive to the hospital.


Do you have predictions for Mike's future?

It would appear that in Mike's future he and Sarah will reconcile. It wouldn't surprise me if he adopted Charley and Ora as surrogate parents and spent more time with them. They treated him better in a few days than his parents had his whole life. The fact that Mike wanted to stay at the hospital with Charley instead of watching the police search for his father's corpse says that he really has put his life behind him and is ready to move forward - into the life he once had as a Warden (that will be made even better by a relationship with Charley) and a new life with friends (Sarah, Kathy) who care about him and want the best for him.

Contributor
VeraC
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎03-13-2009

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I too expected that the POW story at the beginning of the book would play a role in the ending. Since it didn't, I'm wondering... what was the point of the prologue?  Just to give the reader a flash of insight into the relationship between Mike and his father?  Or was there more to that - did Jack consider himself a prisoner of his life and try to escape via his relationships with women? That would better explain to me why he was so devastated about Brenda's death that he shot himself. I don't think it was his love of her so much as what she represented.

 

Because this story was told through Mike's eyes, we were never given enough information about Jack's relationships with the women in his life and why he was so attractive to them. Brenda and Mike's mom were similar in that they felt such strong feelings for Jack that they kept going back to him, despite the violent fights with him. Although they both left him at times - Brenda with her affairs and Mike's mom by divorcing Jack and marrying another man - they could never fully cut off their ties to him; Brenda always came back for more and Mike's mom kept in phone contract with him. Were they both addicted to the passion, violent or otherwise, that Jack brought into these relationships?

 

I think Paul did a remarkable job of weaving together all the pieces to lead to the fabulous ending. All his touches - Brenda's surpise identity, Charley's role in Mike's life and his decision to go with Mike to his father's cabin, the wardens' treatment of Mike while he was in denial about the possibility of his father's guilt - had the reader exploring all the possibilities. It was this ability to expose all the facts and plant the seed of doubt in the reader's mind that made the ending so powerful.

 

As for Mike, his inability to move on and live his own life instead of making up for his father's sins, while also constantly seeking his father's approval, resonated with me, but was frustrating to see. It is not easy to escape the impact that a bad parent can have on a child's life. It was very gratifying to see that he finally did some significant growing up at the end of the book.

 

I suspect that Mike and Sarah will get back together, but I think their relationship will not be a smooth one. Sarah has some growing up to do, too. In some ways, their relationship is similar to that of Brenda/Jack and Mike's mom/Jack. Although Sarah is not happy with the relationship and hopes to change Mike so that he accepts a more traditionally successful life (becoming a lawyer), she keeps coming back. I expect more ups and downs in future novels.

Contributor
Mainelady
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎02-02-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

 

I was surprised at the outcome....all along I wanted to believe with Mike that his father was being framed.  I never thought of Jack as a real good guy, but I didn't think he was a murderer.  Just a down-and-out warped old drunk.  I thought the author really allowed this double sided view to develop really well, and I can see how some readers would be convinced he was guilty and Make was being duped, while others would take the clues and interpret them differently.

 

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? 

 

Brenda turns out to be one of the most interesting characters in the book, although her cameo appearance in the middle really doesn't send out flaming signals that this will happen.  The grownup Brenda who appears at the end has had time to develop into a scheming, manipulative, and vindictive woman who is never going to trust anyone and who is going to make sure she gets revenge for her prior unhappiness.

 

Do you have predictions for Mike's future?

 

I think Mike will hopefully take some time to re-assess his relationship with Sarah, his motivation to be a warden, and his goals for his own life.  There are many directions he could go, and much will depend on how soon he is able to let go of his feeling of responsibility for his father's action, his guilt over his own failure to see what what happening.  Others will play a large part in how he finally goes forward, but there's at least enough for two more books...

Contributor
EMILY7W
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎02-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Rachel-K wrote:

 

 "In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?"

-The Poacher's son was opposite of what we normally expect from mysteries. We were told the suspect from the beginning and the motives became less complicated. I wasn't shocked at the outcome. As someone said before me, the scenes were well written, but I wasn't emotionally attached to anyone to really be surprised or even care who the killer was.

Jack's motive was kind of surprising for a mystery novel. I guess I expected more. I also felt that this man would not have had a problem killing his son. He was a violent, selfish, drunk who never really had much emotional attachment to his son to begin with.

 "Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?"

-As we know, Jack is messed up and I think obviously manipulative. I think Mike handled it well and didn't let his father's remarks get to him. 

 

"Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim?" 
-Brenda is an immature grown woman. She is a victim of a messed up childhood, but as an adult chooses to be a villain.

 

 

Contributor
carol_fa
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎11-04-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

I was completely shocked at the conclusion - I really didn't think Jack did it. Mike had me so convinced that his father was innocent. I never trusted Brenda - I just wasn't sure who she was in on it with.

 

Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?

Jack is a loser, can't believe how he tried to accuse his son of the violence and death. I think Mike was as disappointed in Jack as anyone can possibly be. Mike seemed to come back to his senses when he realized Jack was guilty.

 

Do you get the impression that there were similarities in the relationships that Brenda Dean had with Jack, and Jack's relationship with Mike's mother?

I saw no simillarities between Brenda and Mike's mother. 

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? 

Brenda gave me the impression of a manipulative grown woman. I felt sorry for her at first , however, she was so nasty at the end of the book that she struck me more of a villain.  When she was younger she was more of a victim, but as an adult you get a sense of right and wrong. Brenda never did, she knew what she was doing and new it was wrong.

 

How does Mike seem to change in these chapters, both before and after the violent ending with his father?

I think Mike finally accepted the reality of the situation. He really learned a lot about who his father really was.

 

Does your opinion of any of the other Wardens change as we learn how mislead Mike was in his quest to save his father?

 No, I was in agreement with the other wardens all along. They all thought he needed to step back from the situation, and tried to help him. Mike didn't want to listen to anyone.

Do you have predictions for Mike's future?

I hope that Mike and Sarah get back together. He seemed to realize a lot of his faults in their relationship. I think he will go back to being the great warden that he was before this happened.

Frequent Contributor
rosia408
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎12-01-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Rachel-K wrote:

 

Hi all, thanks for your patience! It looks like we can share our last week of discussion!

 

Please use any of the following questions to discuss the end of Poacher's Son, and please feel free to post your own questions and thoughts for the group as well.

 

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

 

Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?

 

Do you get the impression that there were similarities in the relationships that Brenda Dean had with Jack, and Jack's relationship with Mike's mother?

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? 

 

How does Mike seem to change in these chapters, both before and after the violent ending with his father?

 

Does your opinion of any of the other Wardens change as we learn how mislead Mike was in his quest to save his father?

 

Do you have predictions for Mike's future?

 

 

Wow I have to say I was totally blown away by the ending. I really didn't expect Jack to have been the one to have been the murderer. Must be this eternal pollyanna in me. I really wanted Mike to vindicate his father and to have that "happy" ending. Oh well, not to be and just as well that I am not the author!

I saw Brenda as both a victim and a villain. She seemed a victim when she was a younger girl, victimized by her father. As she got older though, she learned how to manipulate and vicimize the men in her path so she wouldn't be victimized again. I never saw her as a grown woman emotionally.

Mike certainly changed in these last chapters. I am looking forward to see how he matures in the next books. He seems like he will be a more mature partner in a relationship with Sarah, and a better warden.

Correspondent
JoanieGranola
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎11-11-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Kathy, this is a very well written reply that I just couldn't find the words to write. While I thought the novel was entertaining enough, and there was the surprise reason at the end, I agree with your depth of character and storyline assessment. If the book had more depth - which would've made it twice as long - I would've enjoyed it much more. I found the stories Jack told Mike when he was a kid to be sort of lost in the entire plot. Not to mention all the other causes/actions in the book seem a little disjointed (in hindsight). I still enjoyed Mr. Dorion's work, but it certainly wasn't the "mystery" I was expecting.

KathyS wrote:

Well, I've already sadly given my opinion of this novel, but as far as the suspects, and the ending, there wasn't enough depth written into any of them, or the storyline, for me to be surprised, or not surprised, at who the bad guy(s) was. 

 

The ending read well, but there was nothing that made me care who did it, one way or the other.  I wasn't emotionally attached to Jack, Brenda, or these other characters, enough to care, or be surprised.  One of the police men, or any number of lame ducks could have done it.  Yes, this author had you questioning each character, but how much did it really matter to you?  That's the real question I pose.  How much did you like, or dislike, any of these characters?

 

The "WOW" effect, for me, comes only if I'm so totally blindsided, if I didn't see the person's motives.... which only comes when your suspicions are thrown completely on someone else, that you didn't connect the other person to the crime.  It was a roll of the dice, in this one.  It could have been any number of people.  The fact that Jack did what he did, was a very lame reason for a mystery ending, as I read it.

 

The scenes were written well, but the glue that stuck them together just wasn't there for me.  Tell me why I should care for Jack, or Brenda, or anyone of these characters?  Enough to be blindsided?

 

I would have had Charley as the killer, without first telling us that he would loose as much as anyone, as this author wrote it in, (motive for killing) when the land was sold.  Just knowing that thirty years of living in this place, and the love for it, is a good motive to want to preserve what you have......the love for your land, your home and family.....  I wish we could have gotten to know Charley and his wife, and family, better, without throwing suspicion on him, if he's not the killer, it just made it obvious it wasn't him.  I would have had Jack out there, finding out who the real killer was, trying to absolve himself, and Mike finding his father in the process, and helping him in all of this...forget Brenda as a love interest... the real drama comes in the writing by an author, to make us care, or love the person, who in the end you find out is the real killer.  That's when it blindsides you.

 

Anyway, I didn't care if Jack did it, or Brenda, or any of these people who came across as dysfunctional.  If they don't care about anything, why should I care about them?  Of course, I'm only speaking of characters in a novel, not about real people you do care about.  Like I said, I didn't get emotionally attached to any of these characters.

 

 

Wordsmith
Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I too was shocked at the outcome of the book. Like others, I expected Jack to be innocent of this crime in spite of his many other flaws. It turns out that the motive had nothing to do with all the politics and changes going on in the town, but was instead very basic - revenge for his woman.

 

Brenda is a very interesting and multi-dimensional character. Though she suffered as a result of her childhood, in reality she was no longer a child but a woman when the novel took place. It's tempting to feel some compassion for her, given her circumstances. However, she was so angry, manipulative, violent and completely and utterly selfish. Perhaps she was a victim back when she was growing up in the camp the way she did, but as an adult she had free will and the ability to make good choices or bad ones. Ultimately, she made all the worst choices which in turn had deadly and tragic consequences, and she became a villain.

 

I was glad that my original impression of Charley was correct - he was truly a good guy - and I believe he will serve as somewhat of a father figure to Mike in future books -- a much better role model than the ones he has had in the past!

 

I feel that Mike has grown and learned through this experience and agree with those who have stated that this is very much a coming of age novel. I look forward to reading about more of Mike's adventures in upcoming books!

Contributor
LKD_726
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎07-16-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

 I was completely shocked by the outcome of the book.  Mike had such blind faith in his father that I was totally buying into it.  I didn't expect Jack to kill himself at the end so that also was a surprise.  At one point I started to suspect that Charlie was the killer.  I have to say that I loved the characters of Charlie and Ora.  I felt that those two gave Mike a sense of what a normal loving relationship could be like. 

 

Do you get the impression that there were similarities in the relationships that Brenda Dean had with Jack, and Jack's relationship with Mike's mother?

 

I think Brenda reminded Jack of his wife a lot.  Brenda seemed almost child like in a way just as Mike's mother had been when she got involved with Jack.  Also, the volatile relationship between Brenda and Jack seemed to be similar to Jack's relationship with Mike's mother.  I thought maybe Jack was trying to right the wrongs of his past relationship by trying to protect Brenda.  Sad thing is that the person Brenda seemed to need the most protection was from herself.

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? 

 

I think Brenda was both a child and a grown woman.  In many ways maybe her lack of development had to do with abuse or her upbringing in a camp with all men.  She definitely learned how to manipulate men by using her sexuality has a tool.  I think she is one the the novel's villains.

 

How does Mike seem to change in these chapters, both before and after the violent ending with his father?

 

Mike grew a lot from the time of Charlie leaving the camp to being held hostage by his father.  I think that after he learned that Jack had killed those men and he had called Mike to use him really was an kick in the butt, so to speak.  Also the scene in the canoe were Brenda is sneering because she thinks Charlie is dead is a deal changer. I think Mike finally came to the conclusion that it was his life or Jack's. 

 

 

Do you have predictions for Mike's future?

 

I would love to see Mike with Sara.  I think that I can see Mike developing a deeper relationship Charlie and Ora. 

Distinguished Correspondent
Bonnie_C
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎08-07-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Wow.  Did I ever feel silly when I found out that Jack actually did do it.  Wendigo was offered up as a red herring and I bought it.  I never once considered there may be another motive.  Ah well, I guess that's why I'm a health care person and not a detective.

 

The relationship of Jack and Brenda is the sad union of 2 damaged souls.  Jack is damaged from the war and Brenda from her childhood.  Although sad, sympathy only goes so far.  Both of these individuals know right from wrong and they chose to be the villains.

 

 

Contributor
lhays
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎07-02-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it? This is definately manipulation trying to get Mike to go along with his plan and give him time to get out of the country again. Mike finally starts thinking straight and handles this well.

 

Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? Brenda acts like a teen or a young young immature woman. I think that she was using Jack to protect her and give her what she wanted. She is in my opinion a villain.

 

Inspired Correspondent
CharlieG31
Posts: 257
Registered: ‎01-06-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Poacher's Son: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

In mysteries, we expect the suspect to be a surprise revelation, and for the motives and events of the crime to grow ever more complicated as we discover them in the progress of the novel. What is different about the conclusion of The Poacher's Son? Were you shocked at the outcome?

I was very shocked with the outcome I have just finished reading it and I gotta say I still cant believe it I have read a lot of mystery tales and this was exceedingly good I would have never expected for the book to end this way . What is different about the Poachers son is that most plots will only give you certain clues and you will know from the clues who the murderer is or how the murderer acts but in this plot because of Mike's feelings and all the things that are going on in his life first of all the plot is believable , you can actually believe this could happen in real life and second of all all the clues are layed out but because of Mikes thoughts and the situation you never expect for the book to end this way , you may at sometimes become suspicious of Brenda but you never actually believe his father is guilty until you read the last chapters it makes the whole book worth it and am pretty amazed.

 

Mike's father pins some of the violence and death in these last scenes on Mike himself. Is this accurate or a manipulation? How does Mike handle it?

I believe it is manipulation because Mike knows that he can get away with what he says and that he ll be far more believed than his father. Mike begins to doubt but then you can see as he starts talking about being a hostage that he does not care what happens to him as long as justice is made which is why they decide to take him without manipulating him or by shooting at him cause Brenda and Jack see that Mike does no longer care about his life but cares about justice.

 

 

 Does Brenda give the impression of being a child or a grown woman? Do you think of her as one of the novel's villains or as a victim? 

I believe Brenda is a villain but she is a child in a womans body. The way she acts around Jack its just like a Father Daughter relationship not a grown couple relationship. The way she acts around men show her immaturity and her mental stability which is small compared to other women her age. She is just hanging around waiting for adventures or waiting to do something and she sees Jack as her protector and as her big father, which is why when Jack gets angry because of what she did with Mike she starts begging for forgiveness and promises she will never do it again because she is scared of her "father" Jack. Even though they have an active sexual relationship Brenda sees Jack as the fatherly image she never had.

 

How does Mike seem to change in these chapters, both before and after the violent ending with his father?

Mike seems to change now because he sees that maybe the whole world is not against him and that sometimes making a stand instead of being indifferent can be a good thing. Which is why when he goes back to the hospital and he asks for his stepfathers forgiveness and calls Sarah it shows that Mike starts caring for people and he knows that people also care for him and they are not just faking it. 


Does your opinion of any of the other Wardens change as we learn how mislead Mike was in his quest to save his father?

My opinion does not change because from my point of view they just believed that because they did and it was a coincidence what happened in the end but whether this was the ending or another ending I believe the wardens would have kept on believing Mikes father was guilty, from my point of view this was a mere coincidence from life and they did not have enough hard evidence to accuse Mikes father.

 

Do you have predictions for Mike's future?

I believe Mike will now go back with Sarah, and Sarah will appreciate his job as a warden and they will now get married because Mike will no longer be indifferent he will like making choices and taking chances. I also think Ora and Charlie will find a home close to Mike becuase it seems Mike has taken a special interest on the wellbeing of Ora and Charlie which is why I believe when the time of eviction comes, Charlie and Ora will move to a place near Mike's.

 

"The questions are more essential than the answers."
Karl Theodor Jaspers