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Rachel-K
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The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

[ Edited ]

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

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Zia01
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good? I think Mike is very irrational at this point in the story. He isn't thinking straight. It would appear his job is toast, but who knows maybe they'll take pity on him in the end.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now? I'm not sure what he is doing now. It seems like he's trying to earn his dad's love. Prove to himself that his dad is worthy. I dunno, it's hard to say, he's acting so irrational. It's almost like he feels compelled to do what he is doing. He knows his job is at risk but can't seem to stop himself.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? I was shocked. It didn't even cross my mind. To be honest I never paid much attention to her small part in the book beforehand. She does seem very sincere in her feelings towards Jack. I don't know why but it seems whatever he did, had an impact on her, if she's telling the truth that is. At this point I'm not sure about her just yet.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did? I like Charley but at the same time, I'm also a little suspicious of him. With the book coming close to an end, I'm afraid to like any one character too much LOL. I think Charley loves his wife and they have a loving relationship. I never much gave any thought to why his daughters didn't keep in touch with Charley.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally? I'm going to take a wild guess and say women are attracted to the bad boy. I can't fathom this, because Jack's character just doesn't appeal to me at all LOL. I'm not sure what I think of Sally yet but I suspect her role is bigger than we've seen so far.

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DSaff
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

Mike is a young man who is watching his world fall apart. Not only is his estranged father suspected of murder, but the police think Mike knows more than he does. He can't attend the funeral of a comrade, but others he suspects of wrong doing can. I think Mike has a list of people he believes know more than they are telling, and is frustrated by the lack of true police work being done here. Top it off with potentially losing his job, and you have a young man desperate to find the truth and clear his (and his father's) name. I'm not sure my choices would have been much different than his. Mike needs answers and seems willing to do whatever it takes to find them.

 

Vernon Tripp is a loser who says things to get under people's skin. Mike would be better off ignoring the comments and sticking with trying to find out the facts relating to the shootings. My thoughts on Mike being a game warden are that he is trying to make up for what his father might have done. He certainly wants to stop poaching and provide protection for people and animals.

 

No, I didn't realize that B.J. was Brenda and was really surprised to find that she is Jack's "girlfriend." Interesting, but how much of this is true? Jack is attractive because he is a "bad" ol' boy. Some women are drawn to this kind of guy, but in Brenda's case, I think she found safety in him.

 

Charlie and Ora are a wonderful couple and I think they love each other very much. Charlie, however, feels guilty for Ora's accident, and one of his daughters feels the same way. I did not suspect the reason for the wheelchair, but it does make sense. I like Charlie and think Mike does too. He is knowledgeable and friendly. But, now I wonder if Charlie has done something awful to make up for the past, trying to secure his and Ora's future.

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
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librarysusie
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

Although Mike loves his job as a warden I think there is a part of him that does feel it is a betrayal of his father and yet he wants his dad to be proud of him.

 I think Tripp is one of those people that likes to get people riled up by baiting them and that's what he's doing to Mike to see just how far he can push him.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

No I didn't suspect at all.It seems like they are sincere since Jack rescued her from Russ and her father.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

 

I really like the character of Charley I think in Charley Mike has someone he can truly look up to a much better father figure for him than his dad has ever been.

Charley & Ora's relationship is very loving and I think it will do Mike some good to be around a couple with an open honest relationship.

I felt bad for both Charley & Ora when he told Mike about the accident and its aftermath.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

 

Gosh I'm not sure what draws women to Jack maybe its his flaws the I can fix him syndrome.

I'm not sure what to think of Sally she is one tough woman but she has a grudge against Jack and we'll so just how far she takes that grudge.

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vpenning
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

I think Mike is still immature and not quite ready to face the world in a totally rational manner. Compared with Charley, the seasoned game warden, Mike shows his impulsivity, and his lack of judgment on many occasions. He could have at any time explained to either his boss, or to Charley that he was needed at one or the other place, and would most likely have been able to do both. But, he did not even give that a thought.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

I feel that Mike did not truly turn against his father, but rather went to spread his wings the way that most children do. Most kids when they get older have to do their own things. Whether it is to go to a college far away to explore their own roots, or to choose a career that they believe is the one best suited for them. Mike loves the land. Something that his father taught him. His lore that he knows is deep in his heart, and though he has chosen a job that seems to reflect the opposite of what his father believes in, he has actually chosen a profession to protect the environment that his father loves.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

I did not expect Brenda to be BJ. I was not shocked, but I am suspicious of her motives, and desires. She hints at possible past abuse, either by her father, or others, and I am curious as to how this might play out in the motive and killing.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

 

I am enjoying the contrast of Charley's demeanor with that of Mike. His experience and clarity of the situation is what I feel will be Mike once he starts to focus on what he truly believes in. Charley plays against Mike's desires for change by telling him how the world has changed even in his career, and how he must make adjustments in order to do the best he can to preserve what is truly important.

 

I also think that Charley is learning from MIke. Mike's devotion to his father despite what we know of Jack's character is amazing. Charley knows that Jack was not exactly the best father to Mike, and he knows that it would be easy for Mike to condemn and accept Jack's fate. Yet, despite the horror that Jack is accused of, Mike stands ready to defend. In contrast, Charley's daughters are not so forgiving of one horror that they have accused their father of, despite his having been a much more model parent-or at least it appears he was a devoted, and loving father.


 

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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

 

Gosh I'm not sure what draws women to Jack maybe its his flaws the I can fix him syndrome.

 


I wasn't sure what was the attraction either, but I think that your assessment might be correct. I have seen women on more than one occasion have this syndrome, and it makes sense.

 

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dhaupt
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

Let's rephrase that and call it Mike's lack of judgement in these chapters. As I mentioned in another thread I read that some other member called this a coming of age story and I can now see how that's true. Because very little of what Mike has done in these chapters have been done with forethought and maturity. 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

Mike is such a confused soul at this point in time, he's letting his emotional state rule his actions and we have a front row seat seeing how it's working for him. I think at this point he figures that he's so far on a limb with his job, and his many relationships that he might as well jump off.

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

I have no trouble believing that BJ is Brenda and that she is Jack's paramour. We have to remember who these people are, back woodsmen and still living like they were a hundred years ago, except for electricity, and motorized vehicles.  And it was Brenda who told Mike on page 195 "Who are you to judge my life? You didn't grow up with a bunch of disgusting creeps calling you names. Jack's the only real man I've ever known."


We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

I have nothing but respect for Charley, his way of thinking and law enforcement comes from many years and much experience and Mike would benefit from listening to what Charley is trying to tell and teach him.

Charlie's relationship with Ora is one of a devoted and loving husband who's only flaw was hoping that he could get his two great loves, flying and Ora, to love each other.

I think that Charlie's daughters do stay away because they blame their dad for the accident.

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

Well whoever wrote this question obviously doesn't read romances, because Jack is just the kind of guy that heroines love to reform and if they can't they ditch them for the next good thing. Plus from the pickings we've been introduced to so far from Jack's associates, he seems to be the lesser of a few evils.

Sally seems to be a genuine person, caring and trying to be a good citizen and neighbor and she feels a sense of guilt by what happened to the officer.

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Lil_Irish_Lass
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I think Charley knows much more than he's letting on to allow Mike to get there himself. He's the mentor Mike has always needed, it's a shame he came in to the picture too late to save Mike's career, but he can still help Mike save himself.

The deeper I journey in to TPS the more I become confused by the Mystery genre title given to it. Sure, there's the "who done it?" storyline that the story is centered around, but as a whole TPS does not read like a mystery novel at all. Doesn't mean I'm not enjoying it, but it's definitely not what I expected and I worry about that hurting future sales.

It's disappointing to see Mike throw away his career, but what's more disappointing is that Kathy is not more sympathetic to what Mike is going through. Regardless of if Jack is innocent or not, the fact that everyone would put money down on him being guilty would make Mike's job almost impossible to do. He wouldn't be Mike Bowditch the Warden and someone to respect and listen to, he'd be the poacher and cop killer's son and someone to use as a punching bag while the old man is on the run. The only thing Mike can do to truly save his career is to back away from it and try and prove Jack's innocence/or discover his guilt and help to bring him in.

I still don't think Mike is as much of an a-hole to Sarah as Sarah and Kathy are trying to make him out to be. She came back for her own selfish reasons, he could have handled the situation a little better but given how his world had just been turned upside down, I feel he handled things well. He knew he'd end up hurting her again because of his love for his job and he didn't want to pretend it could be any different this time around.

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Deltadawn
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I agree that Mike's judgment is very clouded by his emotions at this point of the novel.

 

I believe that Mike is an honorable person who wants to uphold the law - in this way he is very different from his father. However, he is still his son and therefore craves his father's love and approval.

 

I had no idea that Brenda was actually BJ.

 

I love Charley and his wife, Ora.

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librarysusie
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

Mike is going through so many emotions that they are ruling him and that isn't good because his reasoning goes right out the window.

 

I hope he hasn't lost his job for good but I think if he does keep his job he's going to have to work extra hard to prove he's no going to go off half-cocked all the time.

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MsReaderCP
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

Charley who at the beginning was a nice respectable game warden is now making me uncomfortable.  You know that feeling you get in your gut.  what is my evidence that he is anything other than the nice man I once thought he was?....  He's retired, yet is spending every minute working on this case; on the other side, he may not be able to face his wife in a wheelchair that he blames himself for putting her in.  But there are other ways to get away, other hobbies, other places to fly, and Wendigo would be taking away his (and his wife's) beautiful cabin when she has already lost so much. If he couldn't stop her from losing use of her legs, can't he at least keep her from losing the place that she loves so much. - a likely motive for him.  What better way to make sure his plan succeeds than to have Mike help him find the dad, get him out of the way so that he cannot clear himself?- that is a little weak but having Mike around is a great help for ay reason,  he knows his dad, his dad's past and relationships pretty well considering how little time they spent together.  I'm not saying Charlie is my suspect, but the book makes me think about him at this point.  and he mentioned earlier he has no alibi.  However he doing an investigation, that looks somewhat complete, is it to help him in the future? Or to really flesh out the killer?  or just to find Jack?  another great red herring if he is not the one - I have read a lot of mystery books and it is often the one you do not expect that is the killer so I often look at the nice, good guy as I'm reading. (have not finished book yet- enjoying the small ironies, clues, psychology of the past on the present, psychology of the child's behavior from the parent, etc things I don't usually encounter in my mystery books.

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momofprecious1
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I was as surprised as Mike to find out that Brenda was BJ. She was mentioned in the earlier chapters & I had completely forgotten about her. I actually thought she was saying the truth when she explained to Mike what had happened.

 

If Charley really believed that Jack was innocent & wasn't trying to get information out of Mike I thought he was a great father figure for Mike. The more I got to know Charley the more I got to be less suspicious of him & I grew to like him. I had no idea why his daughter's were mad at him.

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maxcat
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

Mike is at a crossroads here. Does he go for his appointment with Malcolm or does he go fo Soctomah as they have a lead on his Dad? Mike decides to go over to find out what's going on with Soctomah. Mike knows he is throwing his career down the drain but it seems he is pulled more towards finding his father at this point.

I wasn't surprised at Brenda being Jack's girlfriend. I think at one point she was referenced as B.J. somewhere in the book but not sure. My impression of her is that she loves men and it doesn't matter who.

Charley, I'm leary of as he invites Mike to stay overnight at his cabin. He's on my suspect list and I'm leary of his intentions. I know Charley loves Ora to death and blames himself for her accident. His daughters also blame him and they never vist because of that. But the both of them seem truly in love and the description of their cabin sounds ideal even though the cabin might go because of the logging situation. It made me feel sorry that such a remote and beautiful place might not exist much longer.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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maxcat
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I also wanted to add that Brenda is not very stable. As I said before, she loves men and will try anything to get in bed with them. She is one not to be trusted as she doesn't seem sincere about things going on with Jack. She hardly is one to be believed at this point.

 

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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momoftwinsMM
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

Due to the circumstances, Mike is making poor decisions. I understand his need to clear both his and his fathers name; however, his decisions are making them both appear that they are hiding something. Due to the circumstances, I think that Mike may be suspended until the situation is cleared up but he will probably allowed back into the Warden Service.

 

Perhaps he is also trying to make up with his father? His career path was in stark opposition to his fathers ideals, that he is now attempting to help his father.

 

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? 

 

I was completely surprised, and a bit disgusted, at the discovery of who Brenda really was. I don't know if her feelings for Jack were sincere. Does a girl that young really know what love is, or does she feel obligated to Jack, since he is the only man that ever seemed to care about her and try to protect her? I thought that it was possible that Jack might be using Brenda.

 

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

 

I think Charley is the father figure that Mike never had in Jack, but needed. I think that he is really looking out for Mike (perhaps as a gesture of thanks for "saving him" from being shot when he was a teenager).
Charley seems to have a loving relationship with Ora, and I asumed the reason for his daughter's absence had something to do with their mother's health (but couldn't pinpoint the exact reason).

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thewanderingjew
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I don't think Mike will lose his job permanently. He is too devoted to the cause and I hope his loyalty to the animals will be appreciated. However, he needs to learn to leave his own personal problems behind when he goes to work. His judgment has seemed edgy from the beginning so perhaps he needs to take a step back and think before he acts. He seems too compulsive and I sometimes wondered if his brashness wasn't a coverup for insecurity. He has difficult facing his own issues and doesn't take responsibility for his actions but rather impetuously moves forward explaining away his own behavior haphazardly.

 

 

 

 

Rachel-K wrote:

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I don't think Mike turned against his father to work as a game warden but rather turned to it to protect the animals from people like his dad who didn't show them the proper respect. In some ways, he owes his feelings for his job to his dad's behavior which made him more compassionate to the cause of their protection. Luckily he didn't choose to imitate his dad's behavior. He still seems to care about his dad and wants to disprove the rumors that have grown up about the recent murders, which point directly to him. The public seems to have convicted him without a trial because he has always been a thorn in people's backs.

 

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

Boy, I did an about face on my feelings about Charley. At first I thought he had it in for Mike's dad but then I decided he was just doing his job and was devoted to it. I think Mike respects him and is beginning to trust him more. His behavior seems to be opening up doors pointing to other possible suspects, in my mind at least.

I think that Mike is more similar to the kind of ranger Charley was, than Mike realizes. I think he might have become a ranger because of Charley, not to spite his dad. He protected him early on and liked that Charley was protecting animals. I wonder why Mike is not able to get away with the same kind of brash behavior that worked for Charley all the years he was warden.

Charley's relationship with Ora seems loving and loyal. They respect each other's space and needs. I did not suspect the reason that Ora was in the wheelchair. I wonder if there is more to the story than we have learned so far. I can't imagine where he and ora will go if they take his cabin. It will be a devastating blow to their way of life.

I still am not sure that he is not a possible suspect even though he seems to be trying to solve the crime as if he is innocent, because he does have motive, so this could be a ploy to distract everyone from the fact that he was present at the meeting and had all the info necessary to have done the crime.

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

 

 

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Rachel-K
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

dhaupt wrote:

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

Let's rephrase that and call it Mike's lack of judgement in these chapters. As I mentioned in another thread I read that some other member called this a coming of age story and I can now see how that's true. Because very little of what Mike has done in these chapters have been done with forethought and maturity. 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

Mike is such a confused soul at this point in time, he's letting his emotional state rule his actions and we have a front row seat seeing how it's working for him. I think at this point he figures that he's so far on a limb with his job, and his many relationships that he might as well jump off.

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

I have no trouble believing that BJ is Brenda and that she is Jack's paramour. We have to remember who these people are, back woodsmen and still living like they were a hundred years ago, except for electricity, and motorized vehicles.  And it was Brenda who told Mike on page 195 "Who are you to judge my life? You didn't grow up with a bunch of disgusting creeps calling you names. Jack's the only real man I've ever known."


We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

I have nothing but respect for Charley, his way of thinking and law enforcement comes from many years and much experience and Mike would benefit from listening to what Charley is trying to tell and teach him.

Charlie's relationship with Ora is one of a devoted and loving husband who's only flaw was hoping that he could get his two great loves, flying and Ora, to love each other.

I think that Charlie's daughters do stay away because they blame their dad for the accident.

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

Well whoever wrote this question obviously doesn't read romances, because Jack is just the kind of guy that heroines love to reform and if they can't they ditch them for the next good thing. Plus from the pickings we've been introduced to so far from Jack's associates, he seems to be the lesser of a few evils.

Sally seems to be a genuine person, caring and trying to be a good citizen and neighbor and she feels a sense of guilt by what happened to the officer.

Yes, Debbie, I'm guilty of not reading much Romance! I was guessing Jack must be better looking than James Dean, George Clooney and Brad Pitt combined. You make a good point about some of the available men in his neck of the woods!

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DSaff
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I agree with you on this. As I said before, Mike said it would be better to hurt Sarah now rather than later. If he was the selfish so-and-so the some think he is, he would have had Sarah stay for a while; not caring how it affected her. He can't tell her that because she would just stay. Sarah should know him well enough to know that he needs space and time.

 

Lil_Irish_Lass wrote:


I still don't think Mike is as much of an a-hole to Sarah as Sarah and Kathy are trying to make him out to be. She came back for her own selfish reasons, he could have handled the situation a little better but given how his world had just been turned upside down, I feel he handled things well. He knew he'd end up hurting her again because of his love for his job and he didn't want to pretend it could be any different this time around.

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com