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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I agree with your thoughts on Mike. Everyone is so hard on him, definitely "guilt by association," and he did know the officer who was killed.  His father has not been proven guilty of the murders and he has a right to pay his respects and grieve as well. There is sooooo much more going on under the surface of law enforcement here! I can't wait to finish the book this weekend to find out who is pushing Mike out of the way!

 

trschi wrote:

I agree that Mike's judgment is lacking in these chapters, but I think some of it is not as bad as the other wardens make it seem.  For example, why was it such a problem that he wanted to pay respects for a fallen colleague? This was someone he knew from the academy, so it's not as if Brodeur was a stranger.  

 

So many people, especially those in the law enforcement community, assume Jack is guilty. In this assumption, they cannot separate son from estranged father.  There are many decent, good, and honest people in the world who have a parent that committed a horrendous crime.  However, we do not isolate, punish, or implicate the child for the parent's action.  Jack is only a suspected murderer, which makes me question even more why the law enforcement community, and especially Kathy and Lt. Malcomb, have been so severe with Mike. They take their anger out on him to such a degree that it makes me wonder whether they know more about the crime than they let on.

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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kherbrand
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

I don't think he has lost his job for good - even though I don't think he is using good judgement.  I think everyone knows that this is going to affect him - and if he would have called about the meeting and told them they needed him to talk with Brenda to try to find out where his dad was, it probably would have gone a long way.  I don't know that I would have told anyone that I had talked with my father either.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

He is sticking up for his dad by trying to tell everyone that his dad could not murder someone - but at the same time he is trying to save his father's life by finding him.  He is also trying to think of other's who might have committed the murders - something which no one else seems to be doing.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

I did not even guess that Brenda was BJ - that was a great surprise.  I think her feelings for Jack are sincere - but maybe they are misplaced feelings that she couldn't have for her own father cuz he was no good - since Jack was the only one who was nice to her - so her childhood feelings are colored to make her think she loves him now - maybe? 

 

 

I will have to answer the other questions later - it is time to go get my daughter!

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EMILY7W
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I was grossed out to find that Brenda is B.J. I wasn't expecting that. I think Jack gives her some sense of safety.

 

I like Charley for the most part, but there's something suspicious about him.

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shannonbh
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I really love Charley and Ora and their relationship.  I think it is very good for Mike to witness this.  He has never had a great picture of a relationship, although his step-father seems like a decent guy.  It was hard for him to see that relationship for what it was because he felt his mother was so caught up in climbing up the social ladder. 

 

I was very surprised to read about the accident, however.  But this book has been surprising me at several turns.  For example, I was also surprised to read that Brenda was Jack's girlfriend - surprised and a little disturbed.  But I do think I understand his appeal.  It appears he was attractive.  In addition, he had that wounded soul thing going for him.  Many women are drawn to that - and desire to be the person to rescue him.  Although I think in Brenda's case, she feels Jack can rescue her.  Mutual rescue, I suppose.

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Kim_S
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good? I think Mike is becoming a loose cannon.  He Seems to be acting on a whim and not wanting to believe the reality in the way his father is as a person. I think he wants so badly to beleive that his father is a good hearted man and that he would never be able to kill someone even though he was prone to violence throughout his life. 

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now? In a sense I think that Mike did turn against his father in taking this job.  He was so turned off by the manner in which his father lived his life "poaching" that I think he really wanted to do something to put a stop to that.  I do believe that he has a true love for the outdoors and needed to still connect with that side of himself.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? I'm not sure about Brenda.  I wouldn't say I was shocked to find out who she was, I guess it makes sense since she grea up at the camp that she would fall prey to the people there too. I'm not sure if she is telling the truth or not.  She seems to be truly afraid for Jack.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did? I wasn't too sure what to make of Charley.  I like him but am not clear on why he is so interested in this case since he is retired.  He has a loving and caring relationship with his wife Ora. I think Mike looks up to him and his strength.

 

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CharlieG31
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

I believe that in the current state Mike has lost his job because of the trespassing of trust he has done with Kathy and with his boss. However I believe that because of the relation they have and because they have seen he is a good warden , Mike needs to prove something or find something really good in the case that will justify all his actions and work as a motive for the Wardens to rehire him but because currently there is no evidence against his fathers accusation Kathy and his boss can't accept Mike until they find the evidence that proves that Mike was right all along.

Mike's judgment seems to be more emotional and sentimental than reasonal , he seems to have become softer" in this chapters and has started believing more deeply he needs to help his father which motivates him to choose to go to the interview instead of going to his job's meeting. When Kathy tells Mike that he has lost his job , Mike seems to loose what was holding him back of continuing with his investigation, now Mike has no boundaries because he has no other thing to loose for his father which is why he now seems more inspired to continue investigating than before.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

I believe that what Mike is doing right now is to take a stand for his father and what he thinks is right. He is putting a side all the past problems with his father and now he is just focusing on trying to help him in every way he can , he has tried sometimes to let others help but he has realized that no one believes his father is innocent except him which is why now more than ever he feels more passionate of helping because he knows that he is the only hope his father has left before a cop finds him and shoots him.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

I was very shocked when I learned who Brenda was. I believe her feelings for Jack are sincere because she is a girl who has grown around men who have harassed her and have been mean to her. Which is why when Jack met her she felt safe around him because even though Jack was also a drunk, by what Brenda says I can infer Jack was always nice to her and was always trying to protect her which is why Brenda loves him. Brenda sees in Jack a father and a lover at the same time which is why theire relationship seems to be strong. I believe Brenda is telling the truth but that even in that truth she is hiding something from everyone because she is afraid of what may happen which is why she has decided to shut instead of telling everything she knows, I feel that what Brenda is holding up is a key part in the investigation but that key is as well lost because she is no longer willing to cooperate. I liked that Brenda had something to do with Mikes past because in this chapter we see how Mike's past keeps up with him and how the memories he has tried to forget for a long time are now keeping up with him making him question who he is and what he has done with his life.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?


I believe Mike has a very deep appreciation for Charlie because when Mike first met him it seemed Charlie was only trying to mess up with Jack but now that Mike has refound him he is kind of impressed that Charlie is actually trying to help his father who was kinda mean with him years before. Charlie from my point of view is a man who after all that he has lived he is now dedicated to trying to help whoever he can and enjoy life thoroughly without worrying of what may happen. His relationship with Ora is certainly special becuase Ora gives him the freedom of going out to wherever he wants , and then when at night Charlie gets back to his house Ora is waiting for him there with a smile and lots of things to talk about with him. I believe Ora does not hold a grudge against Charlie for the accident and she is actually happy the way she is living, the accident made their relationship stronger than ever. I did not suspect at all the reason why Charlie's daughters were not in touch , when Mike started talking I kinda infered it but I did not see it comming , I was impressed by this but when Charlie tells him all about the accident and their daughters this showed me that Charlie's relation with Ora was a very deep and strong relationship that not a lot of couples have which is why I really liked Charlie and Ora's personality and character.

 

"The questions are more essential than the answers."
Karl Theodor Jaspers

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paulusmc1
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Registered: ‎01-13-2010
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good? 

--I think he lost his job for good and should have.  He was warned on more than one occasion about not crossing boundaries and he didn't listen. 

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

--I think Mike is trying to change the past by proving he will support his father at this point.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

--This took me completely by surprise!  I didn't connect the two at all.  I do not trust her at this point, although I do think her feelings for Jack are sincere.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

--I like Charley a lot and he is my favorite character in the book.  I think Mike looks up to him as a mentor.  I think he and Ora love each other deeply. 

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

--I have no idea why Jack is attractive to women, since I despise him in this book!

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jane234
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Registered: ‎02-04-2010
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I agree i would have never guessed brenda was B.J. This is a very good book can't wait to see what happens between B.J. and jack. Charley is a very suspicious guy i will be interested to see what is about

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wjbauer
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

Mike: If Mike keeps going the way he has been it appears he will lose his job all the way. It's hard to believe he would lay his job on the line for a father who treated him the way he did when he was younger and walked out on him also.

 

Bernda: It never dawned on me that Brenda was "little ole" BJ. I never though Jack would hook up with so young of a girl. Maybe she is just hanging around Jack because he is big and strong and can protect her from all the badness of her father.

 

Charley: Charley seems to know too much about the killing and seems to be leading Mike in the directions he wants. I'm beginning to think he might be involved more in the murder then is revealed. He appears to have a good relationship with Ora his wife. I didn't have any idea why his daughters didn't see him much.

 

Jack: Women from the backwoods of Maine like a big strong man who uses "All Spice" or was it wolf urine and can protect the from from the ravages of the logging camps.  

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lyssadesilvio
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

  Mike feels that Charley is helping him in some ways, but then in other ways he believes Charley believes Jack still did it. Truman could have done it, seeing that he was arrested and let go that night. I understand Mikes questions and why he still believes someone else did this.

  I did not expect Brenda to be BJ from Pelletier's camp. I'm not sure how to take her feelings towards Jack. She really never had any younger men around, and it sounds like Jack was the only one who showed her some respect. I don't believe she is telling the truth though. She just seems very shady

  Charley is a great guy. He loves his wife Ora so much. Their relationship is so opposite then every other relationship so far. I think that the children are still mad at Charley for what happened to Ora.

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MSaff
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

Good Afternoon All,

 

  These middle chapters were somewhat of a problem for me.  Not that I had trouble reading them, but I found myself in Mike's shoes, so to speak, not knowing which way to turn or who to trust.  Mike's judgments in these chapters tended to trust in his father's innocents, but somewhere in the back of his mind, I'm not sure he really believes what he is saying.  Jack has always been a pain to Mike, but Mike has always supported his father, in hopes of gaining respect and maybe love.  We'll have to see how that turns out. 

  Another aspect of Mike's judgments are all the seemingly brutal statements from a number of characters.  Namely those of the law enforcement community.  They are looking for a cop killer, and Jack Bowditch is their target.  Therefore when Mike try's to defend his father, he is met with ridicule and complete contempt. 

  As for Brenda, I actually did not connect her to BJ.  I guess that I missed something there, but when it came to light, it made sense. 

 

 

Rachel-K wrote:

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
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quiltedturtle1
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Registered: ‎09-02-2009
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

Mike’s judgment has fallen to his emotions. He is not thinking logically and his reasoning is in questions. It appears that he has lost his job for good, but with the second chances he has been given by the others, one never doesn’t know if he has lost it for good this time.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

Perhaps Mike feels he did turn against his father in becoming a warden. So now he is trying to make up for it and choosing his father over his job.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

I did not think that Brenda was BJ, but in looking back, it makes sense. Her feelings for Jack appeared sincere, but she still leaves me wondering about her character.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

I like Charley. There is always someone like him in a town; the person that knows everyone and everything going on. I did not suspect the reason why his daughters did not stay in touch.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

Jack is the quintessential bad boy to which so many women are attracted.

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kstempien
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Registered: ‎12-01-2009
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good? I think Mike is consumed by the stress of the situation of his father, which clearly affects the desicions he is making. It's apparent that he is letting the situation get the best of him at this point (who's to say he's in the wrong though, I'd sure we'd be a little overwhelmed and do similar things if we were faced with similar circumstances). As far as his job goes, he's got a lot on the line, and it would be a shame for him to throw it all away, but he's showing the loyalty to his father, regardless of what it may take. However, I don't see him permanently loosing the job.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now? It seems as though he's possibly trying to redeem himself with the actions he's taking now. He might feel as though he left down his father in the past when he chose this career, but now he's attempting to show his father that he, and their relationship, mean more to him than his job. It's as if he's making the statement that he can get another job, but Jack will always be his father!

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? I honestly did think she could be the same girl. I just thought that it was coincidental that both names started with a B, and they were at the same place. I think her feelings for Jack are sincere, but only because that is what she has come to know. She grew up around him, and has had very limited contact with men, (only those from the camp, right?) so this is all she has come to know. If she's telling the truth, she may feel the way she does about Jack, feeling she owes him her loyalty for having her back when she was in a bad situation. Before reading the end, I also suspected there was something going on that kept her so devoted to Jack.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did? I liked Charley's character alot. He seemed to be a loving person, who was looking out for Mike. Charley did his job, even when the story reflects to the past, but he was compassionate about it. He was level-headed, and didn't let it go to his head. I think he and Ora have a great relationship, kind and loving.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? I think it has alot to do with his character and appeal. Women tend to be driven by the bad guy type, finding some sort of gratification in their appeal. Jack's overall character, his attitude, lifestyle and all truly represent him as such a guy.

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hazan21
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

The descriptions of the places where he goes keep on being fantastic, it´s as if you were walking with him through the woods when he´s after the bear.

Mike is in conflict with himself; for one he´s had to act somewhat recklessly going against most of his training and on the other hand his loyalty and true gut feeling are with his dad. He took the risk of putting his own “organized” life on the line in trying to prove his dad´s innocence. The only reference he has from Tripp is what Jack said the night of the bar brawl and although Charley says he couldn’t of done it … I wouldn’t scratch him of the list just yet.

 

Brenda is confusing, because there’s lots of gaps in what’s going on with her and hw knows very little about her story. We don’t really know if she is telling the truth or just making something up to get back at  her dad and her way of life.

 

Charley has been sort of leading Mike very  “conveniently” to the places and people who had to do with the incident at one point or another; it get me thinking if he´s not trying to turn the attention away from himself for some reason…

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JoanieGranola
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Registered: ‎11-11-2009
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

I think he's certainly lost his mind when making decisions. While I think he made the right decision going to the wake (it would've been rude to not pay his respects, and his boss was wrong to ask him to stay home), he shouldn't have blown his boss off as he did. I do believe that he has lost his job for good, which is a shame.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

I don't think Mike "turned against" his father. From the beginning of time kids have been embarassed by their parents commiting crimes or "doing wrong" and Mike's solution to that was to become a game warden as an adult. It's sort of balancing out the universe - his father poaches animals and Mike's trying to restore balance by saving them.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

I had no idea Brenda was the young BJ until it was revealed. I'm not sure about her feelings for Jack - after getting more information on her from other characters, she seems sort of slutty. And that's sad, because she obviously was neglected by her father as a child, which turned her into the woman she is today. I'm also not sure she's telling the truth. Mike's father may not have murdered those men, but she certainly knows more than she's telling and it's not helping either Bowdich.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

I think Charley really misses the job and enjoys being able to participate as often as he can. I believe Mike sort of idolizes him, especially since his childhood, but he may not admit to it. Charley's relationship with Ora is based on true love. He feels horribly guilty for her accident, but get the feeling that he doesn't want to dwell on it too much since what's done is done. From the reading, I had no idea that the daughters didn't keep in touch, other than when Mike pointed it out.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

To be honest, I have no idea what makes Jack so attractive to women. I'm guessing he attracts women with low self-esteem who are sort of damaged from their pasts. And apparently they're into the "bad boy" attitude that he has. He doesn't really care much for women, and I suspect that the only reason he still harbors feelings for his first wife is because she left him and that put a dent in his ego. My sense of Sally is that she loves Mike but still wants him to change. I think she's holding out hope that he will, but whether they will ever have a successful relationship is questionable - if she can't love him for who he is, she's never going to get him to change. And neither of them will be happy.

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becke_davis
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

[ Edited ]

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

If he was subconsciously trying to prove something by becoming a game warden in the first place, I think Mike is now having to face the fact that it might not be right for him after all.

 

I don't think he's giving up on the career, just re-evaluating who he is, and how he fits into his world if his career doesn't define him as he thought it did. Whether he'll get his job back - I'm not sure. I think Kathy ready to cut him loose.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

I should have caught that, but since I've been reading the book in chunks, I didn't make the connection. I wasn't shocked, but I was a little suspicious.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? 

 

I see Charley more of a father figure to Mike than Jack is, or ever was. I get the feeling Mike sees him that way, too.

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carol_fa
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

Mike seems to have lost his good judgment, he is obsessed with trying to find his father and prove that he didn't do it. His reasoning seems good sometimes , but almost passive -aggressive at other times.  I feel really bad for him, I get a sense of he really knows there isn't anything he can do, however, he will not quit trying. I am not sure if he has lost his job for good at this point.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 I don't feel that he turned against his father by becoming a game warden. Mike is a person who has high moral standards and wants to do what is right, even with his unconventional upbringing. Sometimes we go totally opposite of our parents if we don't agree with how they live their lives. I feel that Mike truly loves his father, however, he doesn't agree with how he chooses to live his life. Mike also believes that his father is innocent, even though he has been estranged from him.

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 I was shocked that Brenda was BJ - I do not trust her at all.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

Charley seems like a decent man. Mike seems to llike him. Ora and Mike's seems like a very loving relationship plagued with guilt from the accident. I am not sure why the daughters don't keep in touch.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

Bad boys are attractive to some women, I think Jack is definitely a bad boy. Sally seems like she had a thing with Jack and is a very bitter scorned woman.

Correspondent
HannibalCat
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

 

Rachel-K wrote:

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

I think Mike is hopelessly lost in his desire to help his father and also to believe in his father's innocence. Because fo his personal feelings and desires, he has lost his ability to step back and look at the whole picture. I hope he has not lost his job for good. There should be some consequences for his behavior, but I think he is basically a good warden and should be able to retain his job.

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

Mike is trying desperately to believe in his father. He does not agree with his father's philosophy and way of life, but he has empathy for him. He truly wants to see to it that his father is proven innocent and will do all he can toward that end.

 

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

That Brenda was the young girl "BJ" was not a surprise, the fact that she was the girl friend was. I don't believe a word she says. There is something about her that I just can't believe.

 

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

 

I like Charley. I think that even though he is retired, he is still a game warden and is looking for the truth of who committed the murders. He seems to blame himself for her injuries, but he also does love her. I did not connect the daughters' alienation with the accident, but I probably should have. Children can be tough critics.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

 

I would venture to guess it is Jack's vulnerability that makes him attractive to women, but he is also kind and gentle to them. A good combination.

 

 

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debbaker
Posts: 151
Registered: ‎12-02-2006
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

I don't think Mike has lost his job forever, his judgment is impaired and he is not thinking irrationally.

 

Mike is defending his dad-wanting to believe the there is goodness in his father.

 

I didn't expect Brenda to be BJ. I don't think she is sincere at all. I was shocked and I am not sure whether she is telling the truth.

 

Charley seems to be an okay guy. I think Mike respects him and looks up to him. He has a very touching relationship with Ora.

 

I think Jack's bad boy image and his protective nature is what makes him attractive to certain women.

Deb
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emers0207
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎07-29-2009
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Re: The Poacher's Son: Later Middle Chapters, 19-25

What's your assessment of Mike's judgment in these chapters? Do you trust any aspect of his reasoning? Has he lost his job for good?

 

I think Mike's judgement is seriously impaired.  He is understandably under a lot of stress and is too emotionally close to the situation. 

 

In these chapters, we hear the title of the book echoed in Vernon Tripp's sarcastic laugh, " The poacher's son is a game warden!" This irony has, of course, never been lost on Mike. If Mike did "turn against" his father in choosing this job, what is he doing now?

 

I think there probably was always a part of him that felt he had betrayed his father and there is a small boy inside him trying to still please his dad - to make him proud.  I think there is a part of him that wants very badly to believe that at least once in his life his father needs him and this is his opportunity. 

 

Did you expect that Brenda was the young girl "BJ" from Pelletier's camp? Are her feelings for Jack sincere? Were you as shocked as Mike to learn who she is? Do you think she's telling the truth? 

 

I had suspicions that this is who it was.  I was suprised she was with Jack.  I'm not sure they are real feelings in some sense, but I think she believes they are real.  I think she is badly damaged from such a messed up childhood and probably sees her choices as limited and makes do with what she can.

 

We spend a long time with Charley in these chapters. What do you make of his character? What does Mike think of him? How would you describe his relationship with Ora?  Did you suspect the reason his daughters don't seem to keep in touch, as Mike did?

 

I think he is a very honest, ethical, intelligent character who really cares about people and the land.  I think Mike feels the same way about him and that's why he trusts him.  I think Ora is the love of his life and that he doesn't even want to begin to imagine how he would ever live without her.  I was definitely surprised to find out what had happened with Ora and how her accident happened, but after hering it you can begin to see why his daughters are angry.

 

What on Earth makes Jack so attractive to women? What is your sense of Sally?

 

I think what makes Jack so attractive is that he is unattainable.  Women sense that his first and true love is the land and that no matter how hard you try you will never completely have him, he loyalty will always go to the land first.  That's where his heart truly is.  That desire to attain the unattainable, to tame the untameable can be a very powerful aphrodisac.