Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. On May 1, we’re saying goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Contributor
phenomshel
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎09-01-2009
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Re: Community Room

I'm currently reading "State of the Onion" by Julie Hyzy.  It's the second in her White House Chef series, featuring Olivia (Ollie) Paras.  Ollie now is the Executive Chef, and it's her first holiday season as head of the White House kitchen.   I really enjoyed the first in this series, and am enjoying this one as much if not more.

 

On my TBR list right now I have "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo".  This one has been difficult for me to get into, I've started it twice already, but have been assured by friends that once Lisbeth appears I won't be able to put it down, so I'm willing to give it another try.

 

I also have The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society on my list, and The Day the Falls Stood Still.  So many good books, so little time!

 

Shel

Inspired Contributor
Popper19
Posts: 199
Registered: ‎07-24-2007
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Re: What are you reading now?


Wilson54 wrote:

Hi All,

 

Like many of you, my nightstands, Bookcase headboard and bedroom bookcases are full of TBR.  Plus, I set a goal last year to read all Pulitzer prize winners in Fiction.  I am half was through Michael Chabon's " The amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay".  I am enthralled and find myself sneaking in reading time - even waiting in line at the grocery store yesterday.

Before that "Interpreter of Maladies" by Jhumpra Lahiri.  A series of short stories.  I would have loved to spend more time with nearly every character yet felt as though they were close friends.


I recently read both "Interpreter of Maladies" and The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay."  Loved them both. 

 

I just finished Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick for the teen first look club.  I originally didn't like the book after reading the whole thing, but now that I know there's a sequel a lot of my unanswered questions make sense, since they are probably addressed in the sequel.

 

Next up is "The Media Relations Department of Hizbollah WIshes you a Happy Birthday" by Neil MacFarquhar.  It sounded so interesting on the pod cast I listened to about it.

Distinguished Correspondent
biljounc63
Posts: 189
Registered: ‎11-02-2008
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Re: Community Room

 


phenomshel wrote:

 

On my TBR list right now I have "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo".  This one has been difficult for me to get into, I've started it twice already, but have been assured by friends that once Lisbeth appears I won't be able to put it down, so I'm willing to give it another try.

 

Shel


 

 

Shel,

I read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo I agree that that it is a bid tough to get into. There is  a lot of back history, names and places (being set in Sweden) but once you get past that it is a very good read. It took me longer than usual to read it but it was well worth it in the end.

Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
~ Joseph Addison ~

"Reading lets you visit the world of another"
Correspondent
scnole
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: Community Room

"Girl With a Dragon Tatoo" is great.   It took me awhile to get into it also.   After the 3rd try I stuck with it and was hooked.   I had trouble putting it down. 


phenomshel wrote:

I'm currently reading "State of the Onion" by Julie Hyzy.  It's the second in her White House Chef series, featuring Olivia (Ollie) Paras.  Ollie now is the Executive Chef, and it's her first holiday season as head of the White House kitchen.   I really enjoyed the first in this series, and am enjoying this one as much if not more.

 

On my TBR list right now I have "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo".  This one has been difficult for me to get into, I've started it twice already, but have been assured by friends that once Lisbeth appears I won't be able to put it down, so I'm willing to give it another try.

 

I also have The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society on my list, and The Day the Falls Stood Still.  So many good books, so little time!

 

Shel


 

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: What are you reading now? The Double Bind, contains spoilers

[ Edited ]

babzilla41 wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

I am reading Chasing Fire, the sequel to the Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins. They are young adult books but they are really good. A friend suggested I read them.

I am also reading The Double Bind, by Bohjalian. I just finished Don Quixote by Cervantes and Brooklyn by Colm Toibin.


 

I loved The Double Bind - I've read all of Bohjalian's books.  Was also interested in Brooklyn by Toibin but haven't read that.  Let me know how you like it!

 

twj wrote:
At first it was hard for me to get into and I thought, gee this isn't going to be as good a book as I thought...but then it captured my interest and I was really glad I continued to read it.

Initially, I thought of it as a simple mystery involving maladjusted people, with serious secrets about events that scarred their lives, who were connected by “6 degrees of uncanny separation”. I thought the book would end with a manuscript filled with revelations Laurel discovered which would enlighten all those around her to the rewards of her investigation and make them feel foolish for doubting her. At one point I even thought she was going to discover that her own mom had an affair with Gatsby or Tom! The ending was a total surprise for me. I did not anticipate it all
I was also really shocked to find out that her memories of her attack were completely false. I was amazed that she was able to channel her illness, delusions, into a career which counseled other ill people so I had no idea that she was ill too. There were hints about her own inability to recognize what had happened to her, like never taking off her top when she was with her boyfriend, but I never picked up on them.

I don’t think there were hints that David’s children were not real, that I could find, especially since the book speaks about the children from his perspective,…even having to pick up cindy after her swing accident, for instance. This was spoken in David’s voice, in the book, not in Laurel’s. She does say that she doesn’t see the children often, however, so perhaps that is a hint that they are not real…she indicates that he keeps his private life separate from her, as a rule, which is to her liking. Since he wasn’t in the room when she returned home, I thought afterwards that perhaps he might not have been real either but apparently, according to Dr. Pierce's statement, he was.

I thought it was an amazing examination of the various ways that mental and emotional illness displays itself. So often, signs and warnings go undiscovered because those suffering are very adept at hiding their demons and symptoms. Their delusions often aid and abet them in this effort.

On p. 348 the author writes…For a moment, she sat in her car because she was crying once again, and didn’t know whether it was because she was exhausted beyond words or because no one believed her, or whether she was sobbing for a homeless man who had learned as a boy how callous and cruel grown-ups could be. How capable of delusion. Distortion. Didain.

Was Laurel also referring to herself, having learned that no one believed her either? Didn’t she view those people with disdain when they showed doubts about her delusions, which she believed were real? Wasn’t she distorting the truth? Did she on some level realize this? The statement is a double-edged sword for it applies to herself as well as other adults around those who are suffering from mental and emotional illness. I believe those few sentences say a great deal about the message in the book.

Laurel was not believed because she was delusional. Yet, it was her own delusions that allowed her to function. She distorted the truth so she could live with it and create somewhat of a productive life for herself. The people around her did not seem to be aware of how ill she was and yet she had undergone psychiatric treatment for a long time. They deluded themselves by distorting the truth, did they not?

Perhaps when Laurel became involved with the photos, she stopped taking her meds since she sunk into a period of obsession and despair, often not eating or caring for herself hygienically. She looked upon others who didn’t understand her “world” with disdain. Those that knew her ignored the signs of her relapse. Perhaps deluding themselves so they wouldn't have to deal with it. I am sure many of us have been guilty of distorting the truth to avoid a disagreeable task.

Bobbie was not believed either because he was disturbed, although his delusions apparently were based on some form of reality. His illness was exacerbated by the knowledge of his paren't infidelity. Pamela wanted to delude the world about her parent’s background…and distort the truth…anyone who believed something other than what she believed was disdained! She also hid her unpleasant memories to protect herself and yet she was not viewed as irratrional, but rather hard and difficult, snooty and untouchable. What makes one person's reaction fit into the realm of normal while another's similar reactions are viewed as insane or unbalanced? What makes one person's delusions carry them over the edge? Is it how they view their trauma or how they decide to deal with it?

Regarding this book, I myself am not sure where the reality begins and ends, as well! I need to think more about it or perhaps reread it, now that I know how it ends, to discover what the author meant was real and what was a delusion.

Those three words...delusion, distortion, disdain, seemed important to me when I finished the book. Perhaps we all delude ourselves when we see people who suffer from mental illness and dismiss them as less than human, sometimes, stepping around them, giving them histories like drug addiction, so we can excuse our behavior toward them. We distort the truth so we can treat them with disdain. We also distort the truth to delude ourselves sometimes, to avoid facing issues and responsibilility. Do those three words sometimes actually describe everyone to some degree?
Correspondent
scnole
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: Community Room

I've been trying to read "Savage Detectives" by Robert Bolano.     I just can't get into this book - not liking it much at all.   Has anyone else read this book? 

Correspondent
timetravel
Posts: 97
Registered: ‎03-31-2009
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Re: Community Room

I am currently reading Dreamer by Phillip L. Davidson.  Very good so far.

 

 

Linda

Bookvisions

5 book giveaway

Inspired Contributor
dclement04
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎09-30-2008
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Re: Community Room

I am currently reading "Parable of the Talents" by Octavia E. Butler. She is one of the great African America writers of science fiction!

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: What are you reading now?

I am currently reading Archy and Mehitabel, by Marquis. The themes are still current today!

Contributor
mandyfish
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-02-2009
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Re: What are you reading now?

I have a list of books over on my book blog: http://mandyfish-reads.blogspot.com

I started making the list to participate in the Fall Into Reading 2009 challenge. I already have quite a pile of books lined up to read before Dec. Now I will be adding this one in, too!  Plus, I'm sure I'll grab several of the titles you all have listed here.  I love being addicted to books!

Correspondent
scnole
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: What are you reading now?

You have a cool blog Mandyfish.


mandyfish wrote:

I have a list of books over on my book blog: http://mandyfish-reads.blogspot.com

I started making the list to participate in the Fall Into Reading 2009 challenge. I already have quite a pile of books lined up to read before Dec. Now I will be adding this one in, too!  Plus, I'm sure I'll grab several of the titles you all have listed here.  I love being addicted to books!


 

Correspondent
bookowlie
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎04-15-2008
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Re: What are you reading now?

I also really loved The Thirteenth Tale.  I read it when it first came out about 2 years ago and could not put it down.

 

 


lmpmn wrote:

 

WOW!  The Thirteenth Tale just happens to be one of my favorite books!  I've been looking forward to Setterfield's next book, but I've haven't seen or heard anything about a new one.

DSaff wrote:

I loved reading The Thirteenth Tale. It was so good.  :smileyhappy:

 


JerseyAngel wrote:

DSaff wrote:

I hope you enjoy the book, Stephanie. It is one of my favorite FL selections. Kate Morton has a second novel, The Forgotten Garden, which is also excellent. She is a wonderful author and I'm so glad I found her through FL!  :smileyhappy:

 


I'm only about 65 pages in & already enjoying it! I love The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield & this is reminding me a bit of that.

 


 

 


 

 


 

Inspired Contributor
Coral50
Posts: 160
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading now?

Hi--Right now, I'm reading The Neurology of Angels by Krista Tibbs. When I entered the drawing for this book on Goodreads I had no clue this book was about the process of developing new medicines and the families involved; from the chemist, the FDA, lawyers and the people who need these prescription drugs (yesterday). This book is a good read, I did need to write the characters down and who they were but once done the reading went smoothly. Off the wall, I think this book would make a great movie.

Yesterday, I picked up The Secret of Shelter Island, Money and What Matters by Alexander Green. Reading the introduction yesterday afternoon I think this is going to be an interesting read. I also have a TBR stack and list. When I first retired I ran out of reading material one day, so I decided this wasn't going to happen again...LOL...wow, I was serious.

Cora

Inspired Correspondent
Amanda-Louise
Posts: 156
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading now? (P. Gregory?)

Thank you to those who encouraged me to read The Book Thief!  Once I got into it, it was a matter of hours before it was done!  By far one of the most emotionally powerful books I've ever read.

 

Now......Philippa Gregory is coming to talk here in just over a week.  After reading about her, I'm kind of interested. She has a Ph.D in Literature (which is what I was working on before wee ones came along) and has managed to steep herself in history.  I'm thinking the two should make for an interesting presentation.  What do you think?

 

I've also not read any of her books.  Some say they are really good, but the Harlequin covers turn me off each time I consider purchasing one.  Can anyone speak on the value of reading her novels?  I do like historical fiction...

 

Thanks!

Amanda

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: What are you reading now? (P. Gregory?)

 

Hi,
I read The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory awhile back and i did enjoy it. Her knowledge of history allows her to combine fiction and non fiction in a credible way which makes for a very interesting read. If you are looking for something more cerebral, like Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky, don't read it. If you want a page turner that pretty accurately portrays the history while the tale is woven, by all means try it.
twj



Amanda-Louise wrote:

Thank you to those who encouraged me to read The Book Thief!  Once I got into it, it was a matter of hours before it was done!  By far one of the most emotionally powerful books I've ever read.

 

Now......Philippa Gregory is coming to talk here in just over a week.  After reading about her, I'm kind of interested. She has a Ph.D in Literature (which is what I was working on before wee ones came along) and has managed to steep herself in history.  I'm thinking the two should make for an interesting presentation.  What do you think?

 

I've also not read any of her books.  Some say they are really good, but the Harlequin covers turn me off each time I consider purchasing one.  Can anyone speak on the value of reading her novels?  I do like historical fiction...

 

Thanks!

Amanda


 

 

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading now?

You have a great blog, Mandy.  :smileyhappy:

 


mandyfish wrote:

I have a list of books over on my book blog: http://mandyfish-reads.blogspot.com

I started making the list to participate in the Fall Into Reading 2009 challenge. I already have quite a pile of books lined up to read before Dec. Now I will be adding this one in, too!  Plus, I'm sure I'll grab several of the titles you all have listed here.  I love being addicted to books!


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: What are you reading now? (P. Gregory?)

I'm so glad you enjoyed The Book Thief. It was a powerful book to me as well. I recommend The Other Boleyn Girl by P. Gregory. I have a couple of her other books on my TBR shelf. <grin>

 


Amanda-Louise wrote:

Thank you to those who encouraged me to read The Book Thief!  Once I got into it, it was a matter of hours before it was done!  By far one of the most emotionally powerful books I've ever read.

 

Now......Philippa Gregory is coming to talk here in just over a week.  After reading about her, I'm kind of interested. She has a Ph.D in Literature (which is what I was working on before wee ones came along) and has managed to steep herself in history.  I'm thinking the two should make for an interesting presentation.  What do you think?

 

I've also not read any of her books.  Some say they are really good, but the Harlequin covers turn me off each time I consider purchasing one.  Can anyone speak on the value of reading her novels?  I do like historical fiction...

 

Thanks!

Amanda


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Reader 2
cqconner
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎05-04-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Community Room

I'm currently reading Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides, and rereading Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland with my book club that I just formed. The latter is one of my favorites of all time. I don't know what is so special about it to me, but I absolutely love it. I feel like it is one of those diamonds in the rough.

Inspired Correspondent
Amanda-Louise
Posts: 156
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading now? (P. Gregory?)

[ Edited ]

Oh, I completely expect to read Philippa Gregory for entertainment, not for the cerebral value!  No worries there.

 

I put her along the same lines as, perhaps, Diana Gabaldon?

 

Amanda

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

If you are looking for something more cerebral, like Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky, don't read it. If you want a page turner that pretty accurately portrays the history while the tale is woven, by all means try it.
twj

Inspired Contributor
Zia01
Posts: 187
Registered: ‎08-08-2009
0 Kudos

Re: What are you reading now?

 


bookowlie wrote:

I also really loved The Thirteenth Tale.  I read it when it first came out about 2 years ago and could not put it down.

 

 


lmpmn wrote:

 

WOW!  The Thirteenth Tale just happens to be one of my favorite books!  I've been looking forward to Setterfield's next book, but I've haven't seen or heard anything about a new one.

DSaff wrote:

I loved reading The Thirteenth Tale. It was so good.  :smileyhappy:

 


JerseyAngel wrote:

DSaff wrote:

I hope you enjoy the book, Stephanie. It is one of my favorite FL selections. Kate Morton has a second novel, The Forgotten Garden, which is also excellent. She is a wonderful author and I'm so glad I found her through FL!  :smileyhappy:

 


I'm only about 65 pages in & already enjoying it! I love The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield & this is reminding me a bit of that.

 


 

 


 

 


 


 

I've both read and listened to this book and loved it both times! Im currently reading Dragon House by John Shors and it's sad but good so far.