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T-Mo
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎08-31-2009

Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

Luckily for Britain, the German bombing campaign was not the success that Hitler had hoped for. Yet somehow in his deranged brain, he claimed victory in the West.

 

When the V-1 AND V-2s started landing in England Churchill considered the use of poison gas in retaliation.

 

I realize, and I believe I stated in my previous post, that the Germans were too late with these developments as they were indeed used after the blitz on London. Yet the fact remains, they were still used. The V-1s were first used against London in June of 1944, after the invasion of Normandy. Yes, the V-1 was used more heavily in London, and the V-2 was used more widely against the Belgium port Antwerp. However, over 1,000 V-2 Rockets were fired at London. This is not to say that all or even many of them were successful. The first V-2 rocket hit London on September 6, 1944.

 

In any event, Hitler’s goal had always been to turn his attention to the Soviet Union, to implement his Lebensraum plan. His planned defeat of Western Europe was a precursor to that invasion, so he could eliminate the possibility of a two-front war. His mistake probably was in turning his attention too quickly back to Eastern Europe, and also the miscalculation that the Soviet Union would collapse quickly.

 

A very informative and well researched book regarding World War II on all fronts, as well as weapons tactics, etc is Gerhard Weinberg’s “A World At Arms: A Global History of World War II.” It’s very detailed and informative. Here is a website that details some of the V-2 rocket information…

http://history.msfc.nasa.gov/german/highlights.html

 

 

But I suppose most of this is off topic from the book... so I'll get back on track.


Choisya wrote:

 

V2 long range rockets did actually fall on London.
It was the V-1s or 'doodlebugs' which were fired across the Channel onto London and they were very frightening indeed because just before they fell they suddenly went silent and people had no idea where they would land.  Here is a first hand account of them.  Apart from these the bombs which fell during the Blitz were high explosive and incendiary bombs and thousands of these were dropped in London on on most of our major cities.  Other bombs were 'butterfly bombs' which were small and looked like toys - very dangerous for children, who sometimes picked them up:smileysad:.  By May 1941, 43,000 people had been killed across Britain and more than a million were made homeless.  London was bombed for 57 consecutive days and nights - here is a first hand account of that.  Hitler was surprised by the resilience of Londoners - he had thought Brits would surrender and when they didn't he turned his attention to the invasion of Russia, possibly his biggest mistake of the war.  

T-Mo wrote:
 

As for the bombs in London, Hitler implemented a plan for a series of rockets, V1- 4, which were intended to annihilate London. The V3 was like a long range gun that was supposed to fire a barrage of rockets at London from German occupied France. Fortunately, the completion of the rocket was never completed. V2 long range rockets did actually fall on London, but the Nazis were too late in their development and the tide of the war had already turned in favor of the Allies.


 

 


 

 

 

 

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freelamp
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

When the first bomb drops, when food items are scarce, when young men you know are going off to fight....how could anyone NOT know the impact of a war?  We North Americans have not had war on our soil for over 100 years so we have been sheltered from the biggest impacts.  During WW2 my mother's brothers were all in the war, as was my father.  Women worked in the factories making the machinery and bombs and whatever else was needed.  There were very few families untouched.  In Europe it was so much worse and went on for much longer.   In Vietnam (where my husband was) conditions were too terrible to mention in letters home.   There is war going on right now and I have no personal thread to it but there is no way I could not know about how devastating it is.  We are being sheltered from the truth of what is happening unless we personally know someone 'over there' in this time, but years ago we had only the newscasts or letters which were often censored.

freelamp
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freelamp
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

You are not alone in getting the characters confused, as well as the places.  I've been trying to reread in hopes things would get more clear but it is not easy.

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freelamp
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

thank you, Choisya, you are right on target with everything you have stated and you are filling in gaps of understanding for many readers who do not know much about WW2.   In the last 10 years many diaries have been published (esp in UK and Germany) and all those I have read were saying just what you have said.   After the initial shock of damage and death, people who experience it day after day take on a "here we go again" attitude that I think helps them get through. From our travels throughout England and Channel Islands the evidence of the war can still be felt in the very excellent military museums and also the cathedrals that have been restored after being so badly damaged.

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lindareadsLH
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)


emmagrace wrote:

Frankie's broadcast tells us the stories behind the war. She tells these stories in a way that made me feel like I was there. She made me feel for these characters. The story that has moved me the most so far was the story of Billy's mothers death. I think the war starts to feel real when each character can hear Frankie's broadcast and also when the draft issue arises.


 

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Carmenere_lady
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

[ Edited ]

Rachel-K wrote:

 

The book's epigraph states that "War happens to people one by one." When does the impact of the war begin to feel real to us as readers? Are we listening to Frankie's broadcasts along with Emma and Will? Did one war story from these early chapters move you more than the others?

 

        I find that every one of the characters is fighting his or her own personal war.  The most obvious being Will who suffers from the extreme loss of one of the patients in his care, that is his immediate war.  When he seeks escape from this feeling of guilt in London he comes face to face with the real war.  Putting everything that went before in perspective.

       Otto's personal war is intertwined with what is happening in Europe.  He has left his wife behind and suffers each day waiting for their reunion.

       Emma's personal war begins when Will leaves for London.  Although she hears about Billy on the radio, she didn't run to the Red Cross to offer help.  Eventually she even forgets about him.  But I think Emma would be upset if Will had only left to go to the drugstore and wasn't back home within 15 minutes.

       Iris is fighting for her integrity.  Her letter of purity helps her win the war of Harry and she continues on with her life.

       Frankie sees the randomness of war and has lost her friend/flatmate and coworker in Harriett.  But she already knew that it could happen to anyone at anytime. 

     For me, the reader, I would have to classify myself with of all people Iris.  I'm just an observer, I'm learning about what is happening, it saddens me, but I don't feel the impact, as with any other news I hear on CNN today.  I spoke with my mom recently of the events in the US at the time, she was only 10, she listened to the radio every day with her family but she said it wasn't until Pearl Harbor, where her brother was stationed, that her family felt the impact.  That is when it became personal.  That is when it becomes your fight.

         

Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


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"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire
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lindareadsLH
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

I enjoy stories of the World Wars because I am mature enought to want to know the kind of despair so many people lived in through these ordeals.  But is it real to us hearing about it over the news, then the radio and the newspaper?. I do not think it would have  seemed as real as it was to the ones that was in it of course. Being human, we want to protect ourselves from the pain and torture of knowing that war is going on around us and we take pleasure in knowing  the wars are far away from us.  That is, unless we have personally something invested in war zones such as people we love, our sons and so forth. I think the author was so very brilliant in writing this novel with deep emotions of what each character felt at the beginning of this novel. I like the change in surroundings where the women are playing the roles of the men who are fighting the war. Frankie, Harriet, the reporters, Iris, the postmistress and so on. Was this where the women started taking control of their lives when they learned they could do what men do outside of the home. ?  

 

I liked what someone mentioned about Iris and Harry.  Whether he really wanted the flag lowered or if he was only flirting with Iris. Because when she got so excited about telling him about the certific. she received, he paid little attention to it.  But in the same breath he took her home and made love to her.

 

Just a few thoughts.

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Choisya
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

[ Edited ]

 

T-mo - you make the bombing of London sound very trivial!  Hitler's 1940 bombing campaign WAS a success insofar as the damage it caused to London (look at the film footage I have given, and the casualty figures) but it was not a success insofar as morale was concerned.  Hitler expected our morale to collapse and that Churchill would surrender. He realised that this was not going to be the case so the raids ceased. The pilots in the Battle of Britain* also destroyed a large number of German planes and quite a few of the best German  pilots were killed or captured.  However, after the Battle ofr Britain*, although Hitler did not know it, Britain was on its knees and had neither the manpower nor the military resources to continue (this is the time period of The Postmistress so is pertinent to our reading). First it was Lend-Lease and then the vast financial and military resources of America after Pearl Harbour which enabled Britain and its Allies to continue.  Without those resources Britain would have been invaded and the war would have been lost. That was how near to success Hitler came.  The Vl attacks which came after the Blitz and were a significant attack upon the morale of Londoners, already ground down and made homeless by the 1941 Blitz.  (BTW the website you gave says nothing whatssoever about the doodlebug/Vl attacks on London!)
Battle of Britain: *On the afternoon of September 15 1941 every aircraft Britain possessed went into the air to fight the Luftwaffe and Churchill wrote in his diary 'Hitherto I had watched in silence. I now asked: "What other reserves have we?" "There are none" said Air Vice Marshal Park....'What losses should we not suffer if our refuelling planes were caught on the ground by further raids...The odds were great: our margins small, the stakes infinite.'  The war could have been lost that afternoon, when the RAF downed 52 Luftwaffe aircraft, taking lossses exactly of half that size itself. This is the background to Churchill's famous speech 'Never in the field of human conflict has so much owed by so many to so few'.  On 18th September Hitler postponed his planned invasion of Britain. ' (Professor Peter Hennessy 'Never Again'.)

Just reading about such things does not give you a sufficient indication of what life on the ground was like for those involved. It is important too to look at the film footage of the day.


T-Mo wrote:

Luckily for Britain, the German bombing campaign was not the success that Hitler had hoped for. Yet somehow in his deranged brain, he claimed victory in the West.

 

When the V-1 AND V-2s started landing in England Churchill considered the use of poison gas in retaliation.

 

I realize, and I believe I stated in my previous post, that the Germans were too late with these developments as they were indeed used after the blitz on London. Yet the fact remains, they were still used. The V-1s were first used against London in June of 1944, after the invasion of Normandy. Yes, the V-1 was used more heavily in London, and the V-2 was used more widely against the Belgium port Antwerp. However, over 1,000 V-2 Rockets were fired at London. This is not to say that all or even many of them were successful. The first V-2 rocket hit London on September 6, 1944.

 

In any event, Hitler’s goal had always been to turn his attention to the Soviet Union, to implement his Lebensraum plan. His planned defeat of Western Europe was a precursor to that invasion, so he could eliminate the possibility of a two-front war. His mistake probably was in turning his attention too quickly back to Eastern Europe, and also the miscalculation that the Soviet Union would collapse quickly.

 

A very informative and well researched book regarding World War II on all fronts, as well as weapons tactics, etc is Gerhard Weinberg’s “A World At Arms: A Global History of World War II.” It’s very detailed and informative. Here is a website that details some of the V-2 rocket information…

http://history.msfc.nasa.gov/german/highlights.html

 

 

But I suppose most of this is off topic from the book... so I'll get back on track.


Choisya wrote:

 

V2 long range rockets did actually fall on London.
It was the V-1s or 'doodlebugs' which were fired across the Channel onto London and they were very frightening indeed because just before they fell they suddenly went silent and people had no idea where they would land.  Here is a first hand account of them.  Apart from these the bombs which fell during the Blitz were high explosive and incendiary bombs and thousands of these were dropped in London on on most of our major cities.  Other bombs were 'butterfly bombs' which were small and looked like toys - very dangerous for children, who sometimes picked them up:smileysad:.  By May 1941, 43,000 people had been killed across Britain and more than a million were made homeless.  London was bombed for 57 consecutive days and nights - here is a first hand account of that.  Hitler was surprised by the resilience of Londoners - he had thought Brits would surrender and when they didn't he turned his attention to the invasion of Russia, possibly his biggest mistake of the war.  

T-Mo wrote:
 

As for the bombs in London, Hitler implemented a plan for a series of rockets, V1- 4, which were intended to annihilate London. The V3 was like a long range gun that was supposed to fire a barrage of rockets at London from German occupied France. Fortunately, the completion of the rocket was never completed. V2 long range rockets did actually fall on London, but the Nazis were too late in their development and the tide of the war had already turned in favor of the Allies.


 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

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T-Mo
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (My thoughts)

 


reddrose wrote:

I agree with the remarks made about chapeter 1.  It took a lot of pushing myself to get to Chapter 2. It seemed there was a lot of jumping around between the characters and other side people in the story. The two men on the bus when Emma was arriving to her new home. Once I was able to put each character in their correct catagory it did get easier to follow. As I move on into the chapers, some characters are more interesting than others. I was suprised by Frakie and the man outside the bar. Emma is a very needy character. For me she can only be taken in small doses.


 

I agree, Emma does seem very needy. I can't take too much of her either. But I'm hopeful that I will feel differently toward her as the book progresses. I find it rather interesting that by the time Will leaves for London, she has not formed any ties with the other people of the town. I'm waiting to see how she fares in town throughout Will's absence. I thought it was pretty sad that on the day he left nobody in town came out to say good-bye or see him off. Considering its such a small, close-knit town, and he is their only practicing doctor, whatever happens to him should have a profound effect on them. Yet nobody seems to concerned with the fact that he is leaving. 

 

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Choisya
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

 

In the last 10 years many diaries have been published (esp in UK and Germany) and all those I have read were saying just what you have said.
Thankyou freelamp. I am trying to be as accurate as possible and I supplement my own memories with books and articles I have read.  It is important to remember that whereas a lot of books were written about the war and the Holocaust immediately after the war, since that time there have been a new generation of more objective writers and better international research methods. A lot more information has come to light in recent years, especially since the fall of the Berlin Wall when the records of Eastern Europe became available.  Ian Kershaw makes this very clear in his book on the Final Solution and he has revised his own book in the light of information more recently gained.    


freelamp wrote:

thank you, Choisya, you are right on target with everything you have stated and you are filling in gaps of understanding for many readers who do not know much about WW2.   In the last 10 years many diaries have been published (esp in UK and Germany) and all those I have read were saying just what you have said.   After the initial shock of damage and death, people who experience it day after day take on a "here we go again" attitude that I think helps them get through. From our travels throughout England and Channel Islands the evidence of the war can still be felt in the very excellent military museums and also the cathedrals that have been restored after being so badly damaged.


 

 

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T-Mo
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎08-31-2009

Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

I in no way meant to imply that what happened in London was trivial. Nor did I say that I was an expert in how life was at the time. But I am also not uneducated. I was simply trying to make a comment without writing a novel. I’ll leave the WWII trivia to you from now on, since you're trying to make more out of my facts than need be. The campaign was not the success Hitler intended, is, I believe, what I said. I did not say that the bombing campaign did not have dire consequences on London or Great Britain as a whole. I realize the war was devastating for Europe on the whole, despite the Allied victory. Nor did I imply that my web link had any information pertaining to the V-1. I said it included info on V-2 rockets, which it does. 

 

 


Choisya wrote:

 

T-mo - you make the bombing of London sound very trivial!  Hitler's 1940 bombing campaign WAS a success insofar as the damage it caused to London (look at the film footage I have given, and the casualty figures) but it was not a success insofar as morale was concerned.  Hitler expected our morale to collapse and that Churchill would surrender. He realised that this was not going to be the case so the raids ceased. The pilots in the Battle of Britain* also destroyed a large number of German planes and quite a few of the best German  pilots were killed or captured.  However, after the Battle ofr Britain*, although Hitler did not know it, Britain was on its knees and had neither the manpower nor the military resources to continue (this is the time period of The Postmistress so is pertinent to our reading). First it was Lend-Lease and then the vast financial and military resources of America after Pearl Harbour which enabled Britain and its Allies to continue.  Without those resources Britain would have been invaded and the war would have been lost. That was how near to success Hitler came.  The Vl attacks which came after the Blitz and were a significant attack upon the morale of Londoners, already ground down and made homeless by the 1941 Blitz.  (BTW the website you gave says nothing whatssoever about the doodlebug/Vl attacks on London!)
Battle of Britain: *On the afternoon of September 15 1941 every aircraft Britain possessed went into the air to fight the Luftwaffe and Churchill wrote in his diary 'Hitherto I had watched in silence. I now asked: "What other reserves have we?" "There are none" said Air Vice Marshal Park....'What losses should we not suffer if our refuelling planes were caught on the ground by further raids...The odds were great: our margins small, the stakes infinite.'  The war could have been lost that afternoon, when the RAF downed 52 Luftwaffe aircraft, taking lossses exactly of half that size itself. This is the background to Churchill's famous speech 'Never in the field of human conflict has so much owed by so many to so few'.  On 18th September Hitler postponed his planned invasion of Britain. ' (Professor Peter Hennessy 'Never Again'.)

Just reading about such things does not give you a sufficient indication of what life on the ground was like for those involved. It is important too to look at the film footage of the day.


T-Mo wrote:

Luckily for Britain, the German bombing campaign was not the success that Hitler had hoped for. Yet somehow in his deranged brain, he claimed victory in the West.

 

When the V-1 AND V-2s started landing in England Churchill considered the use of poison gas in retaliation.

 

I realize, and I believe I stated in my previous post, that the Germans were too late with these developments as they were indeed used after the blitz on London. Yet the fact remains, they were still used. The V-1s were first used against London in June of 1944, after the invasion of Normandy. Yes, the V-1 was used more heavily in London, and the V-2 was used more widely against the Belgium port Antwerp. However, over 1,000 V-2 Rockets were fired at London. This is not to say that all or even many of them were successful. The first V-2 rocket hit London on September 6, 1944.

 

In any event, Hitler’s goal had always been to turn his attention to the Soviet Union, to implement his Lebensraum plan. His planned defeat of Western Europe was a precursor to that invasion, so he could eliminate the possibility of a two-front war. His mistake probably was in turning his attention too quickly back to Eastern Europe, and also the miscalculation that the Soviet Union would collapse quickly.

 

A very informative and well researched book regarding World War II on all fronts, as well as weapons tactics, etc is Gerhard Weinberg’s “A World At Arms: A Global History of World War II.” It’s very detailed and informative. Here is a website that details some of the V-2 rocket information…

http://history.msfc.nasa.gov/german/highlights.html

 

 

But I suppose most of this is off topic from the book... so I'll get back on track.


Choisya wrote:

 

V2 long range rockets did actually fall on London.
It was the V-1s or 'doodlebugs' which were fired across the Channel onto London and they were very frightening indeed because just before they fell they suddenly went silent and people had no idea where they would land.  Here is a first hand account of them.  Apart from these the bombs which fell during the Blitz were high explosive and incendiary bombs and thousands of these were dropped in London on on most of our major cities.  Other bombs were 'butterfly bombs' which were small and looked like toys - very dangerous for children, who sometimes picked them up:smileysad:.  By May 1941, 43,000 people had been killed across Britain and more than a million were made homeless.  London was bombed for 57 consecutive days and nights - here is a first hand account of that.  Hitler was surprised by the resilience of Londoners - he had thought Brits would surrender and when they didn't he turned his attention to the invasion of Russia, possibly his biggest mistake of the war.  

T-Mo wrote:
 

As for the bombs in London, Hitler implemented a plan for a series of rockets, V1- 4, which were intended to annihilate London. The V3 was like a long range gun that was supposed to fire a barrage of rockets at London from German occupied France. Fortunately, the completion of the rocket was never completed. V2 long range rockets did actually fall on London, but the Nazis were too late in their development and the tide of the war had already turned in favor of the Allies.


 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 


 

 

 

 

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GreenFairyLV
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

I'm only on chapter 4 right now. So far I don't like any of the characters.  The story is mainly about war, so far anyway, and I'm not really enjoying that.  I feel like I'm not even being given a chance to get to know the characters so I will like them. I hope it gets better.  I'm really glad so many of you are enjoying it, but I'm not.  I read some other postings saying it took them awhile to get hooked.  I'm still early in the book but I hope the more I read the more I will connect with it. 

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jabrkeKB
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

I am enjoying the use of Frankie's radio broadcasts in the story. I do feel like I am listening to them along with Emma and Will.

 

I think the war feels real to Frankie when the bombing started. For Will it was when Maggie died and he decided to participate in the war effort. I don't think the war feels real for Emma yet, even with Will leaving, she seems to be self absorbed.

 

 

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mgorbatjuk
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

When I read the book I imagine Frankie doing the broadcasts and in my mind I can picture the radio waves going over seas to houses in the US and that's where I pick up the other characters. Most of the town isn't concerned with the war yet because the President has said we will stay out of it. Harry is definitely concerned about the war coming to the US and it's hit home for Otto just because his wife is on one side of the ocean and he's on the other. How he keeps his hope alive I don't know. As for most of the rest of the town I don't think war is a concept they understand.

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Choisya
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

 

Sorry if I misunderstood you T-Mo:smileysad:.  I think this background info is useful because it underpins the period in the book relating to Frankie and Dr Fitch. The chapter we are discussing here 'Fall 1940' has the phrases '..Bombs were falling on Coventry London and Kent [Kent is the Battle of Britain area]....Now the talk was of German invasion. Would England stand?...Bombs had crashed down on London now for sixteen nights...' And so on.  (V-1s, of course, did not fall on London until 1944 which is after the period dealt with by the book so perhaps I should not have mentioned them.)

T-Mo wrote:

I in no way meant to imply that what happened in London was trivial. Nor did I say that I was an expert in how life was at the time. But I am also not uneducated. I was simply trying to make a comment without writing a novel. I’ll leave the WWII trivia to you from now on, since you're trying to make more out of my facts than need be. The campaign was not the success Hitler intended, is, I believe, what I said. I did not say that the bombing campaign did not have dire consequences on London or Great Britain as a whole. I realize the war was devastating for Europe on the whole, despite the Allied victory. Nor did I imply that my web link had any information pertaining to the V-1. I said it included info on V-2 rockets, which it does. 

 

 

 

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blkeyesuzi
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

 


Rachel-K wrote:

 

How does the experience of listening to the news via radio in the 40s differ from our experience of getting news from the television and internet? Frankie thinks often of the path her voice travels and believes that the sound of war and a person's voice carries the events straight into American living rooms. Do you agree?

 

What is Frankie's attitude about reporting the news?


 

 

Listening to the news on the radio leaves much to the listeners' imaginations. The sounds of feet shuffling down stairs into shelters the bomb blasts, sounds of chaos, adn war sounds in general would be completely foreign to the listeners. The mind's eye, with the aid of a reporter such as Frankie, can see vivid pictures of the real war as it unfolds.  This is quite different from the Hollywood version of war that the public had grown so accustomed to, in which war had been "sanitized" so to speak...where the hero was always there to save the day.  Radio was there to inform the listener of the realities of war. To that end, Frankie and those like her managed to avoid the censors with their descriptive reporting,i.e.,describing the" bomber's moon".

 

American families gathered around the radio every evening.  The war was only a click of the dial away and Frankie felt it was her responsibility to report the truth, to be accurate, honest, and timely.  She was the eyes and ears of the listening public and she never forgot that.  She seemed to take great pride in her work.  She put her heart into the work and it showed.

Suzi

"I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. " --John Burroughs
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Choisya
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

[ Edited ]
Listening to the radio then was a much more intimate experience.  Radios were mostly small, fixed items, always in the room most lived in, often near to a fire or cooking range. When the radio was on children were expected to be silent - for the news, for the parent's favourite programmes.  Reception was not always good so you had to concentrate.  I think it differed because of these things and because people did not have so many other audio-visual items in their homes. Gramophones were not as common and only fairly wealthy people had a TV.  The only other common audio-visual experience was to be had at the cinema where people saw not only A and B feature films but the wonderful Pathe News films (on the Pathe website here you can see many film clips from the wartime period. Just key in what you wish to view and something is likely to turn up!).
blkeyesuzi wrote:

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

How does the experience of listening to the news via radio in the 40s differ from our experience of getting news from the television and internet? Frankie thinks often of the path her voice travels and believes that the sound of war and a person's voice carries the events straight into American living rooms. Do you agree?

 

What is Frankie's attitude about reporting the news?


 

 

Listening to the news on the radio leaves much to the listeners' imaginations. The sounds of feet shuffling down stairs into shelters the bomb blasts, sounds of chaos, adn war sounds in general would be completely foreign to the listeners. The mind's eye, with the aid of a reporter such as Frankie, can see vivid pictures of the real war as it unfolds.  This is quite different from the Hollywood version of war that the public had grown so accustomed to, in which war had been "sanitized" so to speak...where the hero was always there to save the day.  Radio was there to inform the listener of the realities of war. To that end, Frankie and those like her managed to avoid the censors with their descriptive reporting,i.e.,describing the" bomber's moon".

 

American families gathered around the radio every evening.  The war was only a click of the dial away and Frankie felt it was her responsibility to report the truth, to be accurate, honest, and timely.  She was the eyes and ears of the listening public and she never forgot that.  She seemed to take great pride in her work.  She put her heart into the work and it showed.


 

 

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nicole21WA
Posts: 79
Registered: ‎03-22-2009
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)


lmpmn wrote:

Before I make any comments, which I'll do in a different post, I'd like to ask some questions.  I know we have some people who live in England and would know more about certain things, and we also have some people who have read extensively about this war.

 

3.  There are certain times during the book when we're learning about Frankie's world when she talks about slipping things by the censors.  One example is at the bottom of pg. 57.  I'm assuming there were certain things they were not allowed to talk about over the radio during wartime.  I was hoping someone could talk about that in depth because I find it very interesting that they would try to "slip" things by and how they would do that.  I mean they're on air live right?  They can't go back and edit the show.  Once it's said--it's out there.  Also who are the censors?  Who do they work for--the government or the radio company?

 


I think this link provides some information regarding this question.  It appears that while they were broadcasting live, the scripts had to have prior approval and someone was ready to cut them off if they went off script.  Even today live broadcasts are frequently not directly live.  The TV station I currently work for runs on a delay whenever we have a viewer call-in show.  The last station I worked for always ran a delay.  People at home don't know that what they see/hear actually happened 7-10 seconds ago, but it provides us with just enough time to dump inappropriate content.  In case something that would get us in trouble with the FCC happens, we have a button to push that will cover the incident with color bars and tone.

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brainlair
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎12-05-2007
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

Just finished reading NIght by Elie Wiesel for a school project and we are focusing on Indifference, Faith, and Night.  While reading the Postmistress, when Will decides to go to the war, I had a new understanding of the word: indifference. 

 

"When we know there are people in need, right now, in the same breath as what we are breathing, we cannot look away...That is humanity...human beings do not look away."(104)

 

That's also when I felt the war was "real".  I can't wait to share this.

I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library. ~Jorge Luis Borges
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jenniferu
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Registered: ‎07-16-2009
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Re: Early Chapters, Fall, 1940 (1-8)

As in any war, you know as you are reading that many will die -- some even that you know (or are getting to know through the reading).   The war was used by many of the characters in different ways -- to give them purpose, to hide from facing their issues, to have something to get behind that was easier than figuring out things about themselves.  For each the war feels real in different ways -- whether it is the hearing of a broadcast, or the falling of bombs.

 

In some ways I think the war can be more real over the radio broadcasts than what we see on tv today.  With tv we are so desensitized to what we see and we often only superficially watch things like the news as a whole, whereas the radio was the only form of communication in the past. The challenge with radio though is that it takes something that the listener can imagine and latch on to to really grasp, otherwise, the listener hears the words but does not really internalize them.