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Wilson54
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Re: Last Chapters

Thank you Debbie - You gave me some great food for thought.

 

Carole
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Choisya
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Re: Last Chapters

 

I think that Iris was acting as a friend and not as the postmistress here so her actions were kind not official. 
Do you think that Harry represents those American servicemen who lost their lives in the war, perhaps those who volunteered to fight?  He was, in a way, fighting the war right from the beginning.  The American government and some of the American people might not have been alert to the dangers of the war but he darn well was!  I see him metaphorically as a handsome GI in uniform - the sort who tried to give me nylons and chocolate.:smileyvery-happy:  


dhaupt wrote:

 

I don't think that Franklin and Emma especially would understand Will's attitude at the end so In my mind Frankie saved Emma's feelings by sparing her the last moments of Will's life.

And I think it was very in character for Iris to open the letter to Emma, she knew it wasn't official, but that it couldn't be good news either, because otherwise it would be from Will, and she had appointed herself to be the watchdog of the town.

But I do agree with you about Harry, it really upset me when Harry died, but it seemed like fate in this book always had the upper hand and not even Harry could avoid it.


 

 

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Rachel-K
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

Hi Zia,

 

The "Final Thoughts" thread will come next week with our "Goodbye" threads--but the thread for posting your reviews is up now.

 

 

Rachel

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Tarri
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

"Get in. Get the story. Get out." That is Murrow's charge to Frankie. Does The Postmistress make you question whether it's possible to ever really get the whole story? Or to get out?

 

Interesting question.  I think it is possible to get the whole story; however, the person getting the story must be willing to listen to more than one teller.  Murrow's charge to Frankie is very good advice to a journalist, but I don't see how someone reporting from a war zone can turn off all of their emotions.  Also, I cannot imagine that you are ever able to "get out", in other words, to leave it all behind you. 

 

Why wasn't Frankie able to deliver the letter or tell Emma about meeting Will? For Someone whose  job was to deliver news, did she fail?

 

I think that Frankie lost her objectivity and became part of the story.  By being a participant in Will's death, and hearing about Emma from Will, then actually meeting Emma, Frankie was unable to be part of Emma's pain.  I think Frankie failed as a newsperson.

 

If you were Iris, would you have delivered the letter? Why or why not? What good, if any, grew up in the gap of time that Emma didn't know news? What did Emma lose by not knowing immediately?


It's almost impossible for me to know if I would have delivered the letter, having never been in a situation even close to Iris'.  I think by not delivering the letter, Iris delayed Emma's grief and made Emma's pain last longer.  I think not knowing is worse than knowing.   

 

Why does Otto refuse to tell the townspeople that he's Jewish? Would you have?

 

I don't think I would have told, Otto knew what was going on and didn't know (but probably suspected) that the people here would not accept him either. 

 

 

How do you think it would have changed your assessment of the characters if their attitudes and actions had been set after Pearl Harbor?

 

This story would not have the same impact if it was set after Pearl Harbor, but I think the young people would not be so carefree, the grown-ups would have been more involved in Harry's watch.

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Bonnie_C
Posts: 168
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

"Get in."  Check.  Frankie was able to do this by traveling on the refugee train across Europe.

"Get the story."  Frankie realizes that there is not a The story for her to tell.  There are story fragments that tell so much of what was going on in the war.  She is privy to beginnings as told to her and rarely witness to any endings.

"Get out."  This is physically doable, but emotionally impossible.  Frankie has become a changed individual.  These story fragments have become a part of her and she will never be able to disassociate herself from them. 

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ClaudiaLuce
Posts: 133
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

Will had given Iris the letter to give to Emma when the news came that he was dead.  Iris withheld that letter when Will's daily letters stopped coming - she was not sure that he had died, she only supposed he had.  Frankie was the one who held that knowledge.  Iris should not have opened the letter, but she did so out of genuine love and concern for Emma.  When we truly care about someone, don't we try to do things to diminish their pain and suffering for as long as possible, especially when there is some modicum of hope! I believe that Iris held on to the thread of hope that Will was injured or ill and in hospital in London and unable to write to Emma and, therefore, she held on to that letter, not wanting to cause Emma that anguish without reason.  Both Iris and Frankie had determined that they would tell Emma the truth the day that the telegram arrived.  Fate intervenes when fate should intervene - just before the baby is due to be born!

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-- Sir Richard Steele
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Bonnie824
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)


ClaudiaLuce wrote:

Will had given Iris the letter to give to Emma when the news came that he was dead.  Iris withheld that letter when Will's daily letters stopped coming - she was not sure that he had died, she only supposed he had.  Frankie was the one who held that knowledge.  Iris should not have opened the letter, but she did so out of genuine love and concern for Emma.  When we truly care about someone, don't we try to do things to diminish their pain and suffering for as long as possible, especially when there is some modicum of hope! I believe that Iris held on to the thread of hope that Will was injured or ill and in hospital in London and unable to write to Emma and, therefore, she held on to that letter, not wanting to cause Emma that anguish without reason.  Both Iris and Frankie had determined that they would tell Emma the truth the day that the telegram arrived.  Fate intervenes when fate should intervene - just before the baby is due to be born!


 

I totally agree about Iris and Frankie. I liked them better then for what they didn't do, than any other time in the book.

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Zia01
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

 


Rachel-K wrote:

Hi Zia,

 

The "Final Thoughts" thread will come next week with our "Goodbye" threads--but the thread for posting your reviews is up now.

 

 

Rachel


 

Thanks!

 

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JaneM
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

First, I liked the book.  But secondly, I am confused by the "story" symbolism that permeates the book.  I skimmed through the whole book again to find references to the story

 

P. 167 & 168:  Murrow sends Frankie to Europe since there is "now a story" since J. Edgar Hoover has mentioned foreign-born spies in the U.S.

P. 195:  Will says "What happens to the people after their story is told?"  Frankie says "I don't know."  Will says "you must be pretty tough to bear not knowing."

P. 197:   "There is no story over here she (Frankie) could tell from beginning until the end."

P. 203:  Jim says, "You need a frame (to the story).  People need to know where to look."

P. 250:  Frankie discusses a story with Max.  ""You reported what you saw.  That was your job.  There was a plot."  and Frankie says " It never mattered.  It was never a straight shot."

P. 252:  Max & Frankie discuss the disks:  "What's the story" Max says.  Frankie:  "There isn't a story"  Max:  "There's always a story."

P. 281:  Frankie thinks "You told a story by letting the small things spead.  You looked straight at it to get the picture..." The minute you looked away - into description, into metaphor of any kind -- the thing collapses before you."

P. 294:  As Iris and Frankie discuss the story of Theseus, Frankie says "But the story knew.  The story wouldn't have mattered without the mistake.  The mistake is the story.  That's why it's told"

 

P. 317:  :What happens after the part you gave us? ... The people in them go on and on.  And what happens next?  ... The story knew."  And the last sentences "That's all I have written, that's all I have to tell.  That's what the story knew."

 

Wow - a lot is tied up into the story and what the story knew.  But I'm afraid all of this just eludes me.  I feel like Sarah Blake wants me to make some profound connection between Frankie, her experiences and "the story."  Instead - all I see is the story itself - the narrative, the character descriptions and some of their internal dialogues.  But nothing more.  Or is there nothing more and I'm digging too deep?

 

These elusive references are my only complaint about the book.  I wanted to receive it on a higher level, sure that the author is trying to give me more than I am absorbing.  But then, maybe I'm like the Americans -- too blind to see.

Jane M.
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Kittysmom
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

I totally agree with the fact that Iris did right in waiting for confirmation that Will was dead before giving the letter to Emma.  Emma was in a very fragile state and didn't need to read it before actual confirmation had come.

I really came to like the characters in the book, it kept me interested and wanting to know more and more about each one.

I felt a bit conflicted about Frankie as she was in a very awkward position with having the letter from Will to Emma and also not wanting to put Emma's delicate condition in peril, but also for what she had to go through in England, it had to play tricks on her mind.

A very good story that kept my interest!

Gail

"Open a book and the world is yours"
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kaylami
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

[ Edited ]

"Get in. Get the story. Get out." That is Murrow's charge to Frankie. Does The Postmistress make you question whether it's possible to ever really get the whole story? Or to get out?

I don't think it's possible to get the whole story.  There's too many sides to a complex story such as war, and almost impossible to get the complete truth from everyone involved.  No matter how tough a reporter acts, every story has to impact them in some way.

 

Why wasn't Frankie able to deliver the letter or tell Emma about meeting Will? For Someone whose hob job was to deliver news, did she fail? I don't think Frankie failed.  She reported news when assigned to cover an event.  Her situation with Will was not an assignment.  It was personal, not news.  Frankie couldn't deliver the letter because after seeing so much pain around her, she didn't want to deliver pain to Emma.  I also don't think she wanted to tell Emma about meeting Will because she didn't want to tell her that Will was happy in London when he should have been anxious to come home to her.

 

If you were Iris, would you have delivered the letter? Why or why not? What good, if any, grew up in the gap of time that Emma didn't know news? What did Emma lose by not knowing immediately? I would have delievered the letter because I wouldn't have opened it.  I would have figured some news was better than no news. I think the gap of time that Emma didn't know anything eased her into the bad news. After receiving daily letters, she knew something was wrong.  She began to see others watching her like Iris & Otto and hopefully realized she wasn't invisible.  By not knowing immediately, Emma wasted a lot of time wishing and hoping that Will would be coming home soon.  It extended the mourning period for her.

 

Why does Otto refuse to tell the townspeople that he's Jewish? Would you have?  I believe he was tired of living under that label.  Can't he just be Otto instead of Otto the Jew?  Once a label is attached, others treat you differently.  I don't feel he was hiding who he is... I just think he wanted to be left alone.  I don't think I would have gone around telling everyone, making some sort of announcement, but if I was asked I would have told them, "Yes, I'm a Jew." Just as Otto told Frankie who he was. 

 

Which character surprised you most in the course of the story, and why? Iris.  It was so out of her orderly, scheduled and rule-driven life to open that letter.

 

The novel deals with the last summer of "innocence" for the United States before it was drawn into the war, before many American's wanted to be involved, and before the US was attacked you see any modern day parallels?  Of course. For a lot of us in the United States, the wars that take place in the Middle East or struggles in Africa don't affect us on a personal level.  I know there is terrible pain and suffering.  But it's "over there" and not something I think about too much as I run around taking kids here or there and putting dinner on the table.

 

How do you think it would have changed your assessment of the characters if their attitudes and actions had been set after Pearl Harbor?  Their attitudes and actions would have been hard to digest because the United States would be under attack.  They couldn't say, "Let them figure it out" anymore.  No one would be laughing at Harry watching the sea for U boats.

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Peppermill
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

[ Edited ]

"She possibly thought that Emma might think she was involved with WIll in some way other than as a chance encounter."

 

Ssizemore -- I think you (and some others) hit it on the head.  There was a lot of electricity that passed between Jackie and Will that night in the shelter. Even if Will might never have acted upon it, I think Jackie understood that she might have.  And I believe that Will did turn to look back, possibly at her, when he was hit -- I haven't gone to get my book to check the exact wording.  Jackie probably thought she was tough enough and sensitive enough to handle delivering the letter and the story, until she was actually in the situation, when It became "safer" to keep both the tragedy and the attraction as her own and to risk shortchanging Emma, perhaps even with a bit of self deception about protecting her.

 

Some of us know stories like that -- they are usually deeply poignant.  I love Sarah's words to the effect that eventually she understood that Frankie was never going to tell Emma.

 

 


ssizemore wrote (bold added):

This book ranks as one of my all-time favorites!  The characters seem so real to me and I found the whole premise very intriguing.  I found Frankie's reactions all together understandable.  She went to the field to report the news as she saw it (if the censors approved) and did her very best to do so.  However, as she became more aware of the tragedies around her and the actual occurrences, her inability to report it all nearly broke her.  The recordings of the stories of people who might or might not live through the war were so precious to her and they brought with them the mental pictures of those she had seem.  It became extremely personal to her.  Her encounter with Will brought more tragedy to her, yet she thought she could go back to Massachusetts and deliver the news to Emma.  When she got to the little town of Franklin, she was somewhat comforted by her surroundings, but was very troubled about the letter and the pain it would bring to deliver it.  Frankie decided that it would not do Emma any good to hear about the tragic accident that took Will's life.  She possibly thought that Emma might think she was involved with WIll in some way other than as a chance encounter.  Frankie's hard-core shell has been broken and she comes across in a very human way, grieving for the futility of war.

Certainly Otto didn't want anyone to know he was Jewish.  He was fearful that the same kind of thing might happen to him as was happening in Europe.  He decided to remain a mystery and so spent a great deal of time suffering alone.  I felt that in painting the house, he was "watching over" Emma and deriving some purpose from it.

The attack on Pearl Harbor certainly changed the American perspective on the war.  There was an isolationist policy in place before that, maybe as a result of the horrors of World War !. After Pearl Harbor, the American people felt threatened and were willing to take part in the war to save themselves from Hitler's onslaught, which could have reached American shores (as evidenced by the presence of the German U-boats on the coast of the US).  I still do believe, however, that part of the motivation was to HELP to free the rest of the world from the terrible stranglehold caused by Hitler's invasion.  For good or ill, it is part of the American character to try to help---I know my Dad and other relatives believed they were doing good for someone else as well as fighting for their own hearth and home.  Americans (and certainly more than Americans) had no idea of the consummate horrors of the concentration camps.  I truly believe that if that barbarism had been know, the response on the part of all nations would have been sooner.  Ask anyone who liberated those camps (if they will even talk about it, which few will)  what they found and their shock and despair over the event.  We seem to repeat history over and over again, don't we?


 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Cobalt-blue4
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

Otto didn't tell the townspeople he was Jewish out of fear. Although Otto was 'safe' at the moment living in Franklin, he was tremendously affected by the war. His wife was in Gurs, the last he heard, and he also made a great escape to the US.

 

Frankie could have actually interviewed Otto on a train. Otto could have been any one of those people trying to get to Lisbon where there wasn't enough room on the train or, even worse, he could have been shot by the Germans, just as Thomas was. Otto may be presently living out daily routines in Franklin, but his memories and emotions are very much affected by his life back in Europe. 

 

There was no mention of Jewish people living in Franklin year round. If there were Jewish people living in Franklin, Otto may have bonded with them. They could have had family in Europe trying to leave on the trains and boats as we assume Otto did. Luckily,he had Frankie to open up to because she DOES understand. She experienced first hand the flight of the jews. 

 

Now, being that Otto was being stoned without the townspeople knowing his true story, imagine what his life would have been like if they really did know the truth. He is already not trusted. Telling the truth would only give the select, close-minded people more ammunition to harm Otto emotionally and physically.

 

Otto desires safety and there is too much at risk to tell the truth. What happens if Harry is right about the German U-boats landing in Franklin? All it takes is one anti-semitic to turn Otto in, which in turn, ends his life. He came to Franklin for safety, which to Otto, means more than reacting to the bullying behavior by the kids throwing stones.

 

And, by the way, where were those parents? They weren't throwing stones, but were permitting it to happen. On page 287, Harry didn't even join Frankie to stop the stone throwing!  (Maybe he didn't see or by the time he saw, it all happened too fast?)   Too make it even worse, how could Otto tell the truth, 'my dad's the policeman' one boy shouted. If the public officials won't protect Otto, then who will? He has to fend for himself, which is not fighting back and keeping his secret along with a calm intent.

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Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
Registered: ‎11-05-2006

Re: Defining Quote

Donna, I certainly enjoy and respect your remarks in all First Looks we've shared, but I just have to tell you that although this is indeed a beautiful passage I had another image that spoiled it for me.  It brought to mind the animated version of The Grinch Who Stole Christmas.  Yes, as the Grinch stood on the mountaintop and looked down upon Whoville and his heart began to grow larger and larger and that foolish smirk on his face became a sentimental grin he realized that there was more to Christmas than just presents etc etc.etc.  Frankie comes to realize that there is more to news is more than just a story it is people, emotions, flesh and blood.
DSaff wrote:

As I was reading the last section, I came upon this quote that I think defines the book in a beautiful way. I am interested in what others think as well.

 

"And the seed that had lain curled in Frankie's heart all this while unfurled. Petal after white petal opened slowly from her heart and started reaching up and out. Some stories don't get told. Some stories you hold on to. To stand and watch and hold it in your arms was not cowardice. To look straight at the beast and feel its breath on your flanks and not to turn -- one could carry the world that way." pg. 309

 


 

Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

[ Edited ]

 

If the main purpose seems to be simply to get the message out, then  the wrong message may sometimes be sent.  Getting the story to the public quickly does not allow for the checking of facts. Often, incorrect information gets out there and once out, it is believed. Corrections are delivered to random audiences so that the misinformation often becomes the truth and perpetuates itself.
There is a parallel to this thought in the Postmistress regarding Will's last letter and the government's notification of Will's death. Both messages were hidden from Emma by Frankie and the Postmistress. Both characters did it for different reasons, but the truth was subverted, in the end. Did the ends justify the means? Did the two women play G-d? Were they right or wrong? It was a moral dilemma. They did what they thought was right. We are all human.



Rachel-K wrote:

"Get in. Get the story. Get out." That is Murrow's charge to Frankie. Does The Postmistress make you question whether it's possible to ever really get the whole story? Or to get out?

 

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dhaupt
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Re: Last Chapters

 


Choisya wrote:

 

Do you think that Harry represents those American servicemen who lost their lives in the war, perhaps those who volunteered to fight?  He was, in a way, fighting the war right from the beginning.  The American government and some of the American people might not have been alert to the dangers of the war but he darn well was!  I see him metaphorically as a handsome GI in uniform - the sort who tried to give me nylons and chocolate.:smileyvery-happy:  


Hmm Choisya,
something to definitely think about. And I don't know, I was confused about Harry's death because it seemed untimely right when everything was finally coming together for him. I know that people lived shorter lives then and heavens look at their life style, but I would have preferred it if Harry had lived. But then again if he had lived I guess he wouldn't still be on my mind either.   But as far as he representing the deaths of our GIs, it's something to think about.

 


 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

I think he was used to having to hide his background. Being Jewish in those times was anathema. There is a possibility that he would have been treated even more poorly once they found out he was not only German, but  Jewish too. It isn't as if there was no anti-semitism in the town.
I don't know what I would have done in those circumstances. The subject is too close to me to even think of it. On second thought, I am pretty outspoken about Jewish issues today, because of the Holocaust and existing anti-semitism, so maybe my big mouth would have gotten me into trouble or perhaps even destroyed me in the end. What is right, to speak out and try and change things or keep quiet and protect oneself? I have no answer. I imagine one decides such things in the moment.

Rachel-K wrote:

Why does Otto refuse to tell the townspeople that he's Jewish? Would you have?

 

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babzilla41
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

What good, if any, grew up in the gap of time that Emma didn't know news? What did Emma lose by not knowing immediately?

 

I don't think Emma lost anything by not knowing immediately that Will had died.  I don't think she would have been able to handle the news had she heard about it as soon as it happened.  The delay allowed her time to accept the fact that he was not coming back to her. Even though she had not heard the news officially, she knew in her heart that he was gone.

"I love books. If I could eat them, I would. I love their scent and often put my nose in to inhale their aroma." - Kathleen Grissom
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thewanderingjew
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

I think Frankie didn't mail the letter at first because she was angry at Will because she didn't like his attitude. I don't think she really felt connected to him and so she didn't feel the need or the burden to post it. When the war truly touched her, her attitude changed and then she wanted to deliver it perhaps to make an effort to make the world a better place, by doing the right thing, by finally connecting with "the people" as she had hoped to do with her broadcasts.
In the end she realized it was futile. She would have caused more sadness and served no purpose. Perhaps Murrow knew that, perhaps he understood that people would connect more with straight information rather than painful messages. Perhaps he knew they couldn't really handle it. I don't think it would have helped Emma to know how Will died or how Frankie felt at the time. It would have served Frankie's needs, not Emma's.
However, I think I might have mailed the letter right away, without thinking about its effects, because I wouldn't have known Will's last thoughts, I wouldn't have known the contents of the letter. I would probably have believed that Emma would want his last letter. I would have assumed that the government was going to notify her too. Also, it is generally my nature to do the right thing (which might have been the wrong thing in this instance) and I was brought up to believe that mail delivery was sacrosanct and an offense punishable by law.

Rachel-K wrote:
Why wasn't Frankie able to deliver the letter or tell Emma about meeting Will? For Someone whose  job was to deliver news, did she fail?

 

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Carmenere_lady
Posts: 529
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Re: Later Chapters: Summer, 1941 (18 - 28)

Lot's of meat in these final chapters, I would not know where to begin w/out you steering, Rachel.  My thoughts in bold.
Rachel-K wrote:

Please use any of the following questions as a jumping off point to discuss the end of The Postmistress. Please remember that all spoilers are welcome in this thread!

 

"Get in. Get the story. Get out." That is Murrow's charge to Frankie. Does The Postmistress make you question whether it's possible to ever really get the whole story? Or to get out?

              

 

Why wasn't Frankie able to deliver the letter or tell Emma about meeting Will? For Someone whose hob job was to deliver news, did she fail?

                Delivering Will's letter was not Frankie's job, just an act of kindness on her part to bring it in person.  So much time had elapsed  between Will's demise that Frankie assumed that Emma knew of his death. 

                We, the readers, know what was written in the letter "Darling,  Good night my sweet.  I'll write more tomorrow, I promise."  We know that it is inconsequential, but Frankie doesn't.  She should have put in the mailbox and be done with it.  But then, there's no story.

 

If you were Iris, would you have delivered the letter? Why or why not? What good, if any, grew up in the gap of time that Emma didn't know news? What did Emma lose by not knowing immediately?

 

                If I were Iris I would not have opened the letter in the first place but delivered it to Emma personally and stayed while she read it for support.  It would have given Emma some time to locate him, is he in hospital, is he disoriented etc.

 

                The only good I see in it is that she had begun to assume that he was dead or he would have written.

                If, she knew immediately, as if Will had identification on him and if Emma would have sailed to London, Emma lost that last touch, that last goodbye, the last kiss on his forehead a whisper in his ear that he was to be a dad.  Closure.  But all that was  impossible in 1940.  So she really doesn't lose much by not knowing immediately.

 

Why does Otto refuse to tell the townspeople that he's Jewish? Would you have?

 

          Well let's face it, the townspeople don't trust Otto, Otto can't trust the townspeople.  He doesn't know who, when or if he'll be sent back to Austria.  He's just being a good citizen and hopes that his wife will eventually come to America.

 

 

 

Which character surprised you most in the course of the story, and why?

 

        I was a little sceptical of Harry at the onset but he turned out to be a decent guy who just happened to be a little jittery over the Germans bringing the war to the US because he had experienced WWI.

 

The novel deals with the last summer of "innocence" for the United States before it was drawn into the war, before many American's wanted to be involved, and before the US was attacked you see any modern day parallels? 

     As someone mentioned, most of us didn't see 9/11 coming.  We just go about our everyday business with little knowledge of the world around us.  I fear we're too caught up in stories of the pick of the day celebraties  to see the important stuff.  Stepping up on the soap box to add that IMO not many reporters today search and investigate stories, they seem to be more reactive rather than proactive.  I admire Murrow's remark "Our job is not to persuade just provide the honest news....and when there isn't any news, why, just say so." 

     I'd love to read more on Murrow and if anyone has a recommendation I'd really appreciate it.

 

   


 

Lynda

"I think of literature.....as a vast country to the far borders of which I am journeying but will never reach."
The Uncommon Reader


"You've been running around naked in the stacks again, haven't you?"
"Um, maybe."
The Time Traveler's Wife

It is with books as with men; a very small number play a great part.
Voltaire