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Amy-Einhorn
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Registered: ‎08-25-2009
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Re: Questions for Publisher and Editor, Amy Einhorn?

Kim:  it's funny, as a reader I agree with you -- it drives me a little nuts when I see either a typo or a mistake in a book I'm reading for pleasure. But having been on the other side of the fence, I know that there are many different stages a book has to go through before it's a book you see in the bookstore.  First a book is copyedited, then it's proofed in first pass and second pass pages -- so all three stages are gone over for spelling, grammar, overall mistakes.   I've always been incredibly impressed by the copy editors I've worked with (not to generalize, but copy editors are the type of people who would win a million dollars on Jeopardy or any quiz show, they seem to know everything). The whole process is a bit more complicated and entails more than what I just explained (for any book you read, whether a physical copy or a hard copy book, I think we were just told they've counted that 41 people have worked on it in some capacity or another-- 41)  but hopefully this will at least let you know that there are many people looking at a book for mistakes -- but unfortunately a few slip by.

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Amy-Einhorn
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎08-25-2009
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Re: Questions for Publisher and Editor, Amy Einhorn?

Dear Everyone: as it's the end of the week, my time is up so this is my last posting. I just want to say thank you for the lively, interesting discussion.  it was a real pleasure to talk to you and hear your thoughts and comments about THE POSTMISTRESS. I hope my answers helped shed some light on not only the book but the publishing process. Thanks so much for letting me be part of the discussion.   If it wasn't for readers like you I wouldn't have a job so thank you also for being such avid and interested readers, especially in a day and age when so many other things are competing for your attention.

 

I hope you'll spread the word about THE POSTMISTRESS -- if anything our postings here have shown that while we may disagree on some things about the book, I think we can all agree that it's a book quite worthy of discussion.

 

Thanks again and I hope our paths will cross again soon.

 

Sincerely,

 

Amy Einhorn

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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Questions for Publisher and Editor, Amy Northern?

 


Amy-Einhorn wrote:

Very glad you ended up liking it. As I just told another reader, I hadn't heard before this discussion that people were finding the beginning choppy or hard to follow --  these discussions are certainly valuable, too bad we can't have them for all of our books while we're editing them!  That said, I do think when you have a third person omniscient narrator and more than one main character, there's some inevitable adjustment time that a reader needs to allow themselves to get into the flow of the book.  

 

Re: the specific scenes you reference - Frankie's period I didn't think was gratuitous -- to me it really placed me in the time period in terms of what that entailed back then for women -- the washing out of the panties, the sanitary napkins such as they were, and the fact that yes, Frankie wasn't relieved at getting her period, it never really crosses her mind, she's not a typical woman  of the time if you will, she's a bit fearless and single-minded, it never seems to occur to her that she could get pregnant. Also, I do think Frankie's getting her period contrasts nicely to Emma's not getting hers -- to be honest both strike me as fairly non-maternal which is interesting given at that time it seems one of the few things women were relegated to do. 

 

 And re: your point about Iris' letter at the beginning of the book, well to me that shows so much -- her preconceived notions of what a man might want, her wanting to follow the "rules" as she envisions them but yet she then doesn't follow the rules in so many ways later on (both in her affair and in her not delivering the letter).

 

The typos and other mistakes hopefully will have all been caught for the final book -- keep in mind you are reading an advance galley so we're still making minor corrections for the final book. (Bold added.)


 

 

It may not have been major to Frankie, but it might have, if she had not gotten her period -- or at least we might have had a very different story.  If nothing else, it clued us in as readers.   I read it, was going to keep on going, with an oh, yeah, why do I need to know this, when the significance for Frankie dawned on me, and I stopped and re-read!

 

Even though set in the 1940's and not post-war, some of this book smacks of the edge of what I am learning to label "postmodernism" -- a collage of viewpoints, frank sexuality, disjointed time, ....  I wonder if that is one source of our discomfort with reading if we are accustomed to modern or Victorian storylines.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Questions for Publisher and Editor, Amy Northern?

 

Yes, that's true Peppermill, we  know that when Frankie gets her period we don't have to wonder whether she can carry on being a reporter and we know that when Emma doesn't get hers we will wonder about how she will manage without Will.  I agree with you about the postmodernist aspects of the novel and that in these bookclubs we are used to reading the classics, well at least some of us are.   

Peppermill wrote:

 


Amy-Einhorn wrote:

Very glad you ended up liking it. As I just told another reader, I hadn't heard before this discussion that people were finding the beginning choppy or hard to follow --  these discussions are certainly valuable, too bad we can't have them for all of our books while we're editing them!  That said, I do think when you have a third person omniscient narrator and more than one main character, there's some inevitable adjustment time that a reader needs to allow themselves to get into the flow of the book.  

 

Re: the specific scenes you reference - Frankie's period I didn't think was gratuitous -- to me it really placed me in the time period in terms of what that entailed back then for women -- the washing out of the panties, the sanitary napkins such as they were, and the fact that yes, Frankie wasn't relieved at getting her period, it never really crosses her mind, she's not a typical woman  of the time if you will, she's a bit fearless and single-minded, it never seems to occur to her that she could get pregnant. Also, I do think Frankie's getting her period contrasts nicely to Emma's not getting hers -- to be honest both strike me as fairly non-maternal which is interesting given at that time it seems one of the few things women were relegated to do. 

 

 And re: your point about Iris' letter at the beginning of the book, well to me that shows so much -- her preconceived notions of what a man might want, her wanting to follow the "rules" as she envisions them but yet she then doesn't follow the rules in so many ways later on (both in her affair and in her not delivering the letter).

 

The typos and other mistakes hopefully will have all been caught for the final book -- keep in mind you are reading an advance galley so we're still making minor corrections for the final book. (Bold added.)


 

 

It may not have been major to Frankie, but it might have, if she had not gotten her period -- or at least we might have had a very different story.  If nothing else, it clued us in as readers.   I read it, was going to keep on going, with an oh, yeah, why do I need to know this, when the significance for Frankie dawned on me, and I stopped and re-read!

 

Even though set in the 1940's and not post-war, some of this book smacks of the edge of what I am learning to label "postmodernism" -- a collage of viewpoints, frank sexuality, disjointed time, ....  I wonder if that is one source of our discomfort with reading if we are accustomed to modern or Victorian storylines.