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maryfrancesa
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

I agree with what has been written.  I don't think even Harriet knew of the plight of the european jews.  Maybe the Nazi knew that someone would investiagtes the plight and that is why the pretense of the papers and the departing trains that never came until after the majority of the papers expired.  It makes you think of all the sarcifaces that the Jeish family did with traveling, hopefully sending their children off by themselves to be saved. 

With Thomas I think he would have been discovered sooner I cannot imagine that the Nazis would not go through all the train cars to discover hidden people.  I think that this one episode really seals the deal with Frankie that she will try her best to get the story out.  I kept wondering if shecwas not going to get caught someehere doing her travels. I just kept rooting for her

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babzilla41
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎05-04-2009
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

What stories-or bits of stories--were most meaningful for you?

 

The story that really got to me was when the little boy was separated from his mother after getting off the train.  Frankie saw what was happening and began yelling and banging on the train window.  I could see that scene unfold in my mind - I could hear and feel the desparation she felt for mother and son to no avail. . . and then the fear she had to have felt when the German officer leveled his gun at her through the window.  Unfortunately, without realizing it, she, at that point, sealed Thomas' fate.

"I love books. If I could eat them, I would. I love their scent and often put my nose in to inhale their aroma." - Kathleen Grissom
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nadine1
Posts: 41
Registered: ‎10-16-2007

Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

Harriet and Frankie reminded me of graduate students, looking or searching through piles of scholarly articles (in this case the true stories they had yet to find) to create a hypothesis.  However, in their time period, they could not simply go to the internet to find data/information at the click of a button.  Their boss wanted them to support their hypothesis, which they hadn't generated yet, with data/information from these true stories.  The soundbites from the real people make the story come alive. 

 

The Holocaust Resource Center at Kean University in Union, New Jersey, collected oral history videotapes (personal accounts of Holocaust survivors and liberators) after the war, whereas Frankie collected oral history recordings on her portable phonograph machine during the war.  Many of these Holocaust testimonies are in Dr. Preil's book.

 

Holocaust Testimonies 

 

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fordmg
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

Actually I think Jim Holland was saying that people's stories were not news.  The news was military detachments and who won or lost a battle.  I think Frankie was changing the way news was reported.  Just like in London, it seemed like she was changing the definition of hero.  The antihero was someone who survived, not someone doiong heroic feats.  I think Frankie has a story to tell.  Jim was just living the moment. 

MG

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

Frankie wanted to continue Harriet's legacy by collecting true stories of what was happening to the Jews in Europe. I think Jim was trying to tell Frankie that people need soundbites that direct them to the place you want them to go with the information you provide. He probably felt that collecting so many stories was too diluted an approach and did not make it personal enough, would not let it touch people the way she wanted it to touch them. Too much information is rejected by most people.
However, in retrospect., the people who collected those stories provided the true history of the times. I think Frankie may have been a good enough reporter to collect and then sift out the parts she needed to direct the world's attention to the right place. She was one of the unsung heroes of World War II. There were many real reporters who tried to do just what she did. We often don't give enough credit to the journalists who put themselves in harm's way to expose the truth, whether or not people are listening.
Rachel-K wrote:

 

Jim Holland tells Frankie she doesn't have a story. Why not? Do you agree? Is Frankie a "collector" on this trip rather than a reporter?

 

 


 

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MsReaderCP
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Registered: ‎07-10-2009
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

The censors!  It seems there are not enough English speaking soldiers to have competent censors and so Frankie Bard is able to say part of a few broadcasts until she is forced out of France.  She is able to trick them  by using a calm tone of voice that would never indicate she was urging the people to hear the uprising in her words.  She uses ambiguous words that could be taken to mean nothing serious to a soldier who did not understand the workings of the languange, especially if the words are used alone such as "Listen" - and the American people knew Frankie Bard and how she usually sounded versus how she sounded over "there".  Emma heard the difference.  She also used her blonde hair and sexuality to smile and walk off with a young guy to play down the seriouslness of what she had said one time.  Of course, I guess they just decided to censor everybody to solve these problems.

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Sheltiemama
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Registered: ‎06-01-2009
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

Frankie realizes very quickly that she won't be able to follow one family start to finish and has to adjust her game plan. She's also shaken when she realizes that there won't be enough trains to take everyone to safety.

 

The censors are Germans, and Frankie pushes as far as she can go. I loved it when she hummed the Morse code for the letter V!

 

I love the idea of Frankie capturing the existence of the refugees on the recorder and can almost hear the scratching as she plays back the interviews. People are curious about the recorder. Some don't want to be interviewed and are a little suspicious, but most seem to want their stories recorded. She says America doesn't know what to think and hopes the interviews shapes U.S. opinions.

 

Frankie is swimming in the information rushing at her and is trying to make sense of it all and construct a story out of so many little bits. Hearing the various stories makes me think of the refugees (and those who didn't escape) as individuals instead of as the large mass conjured up by the word "Holocaust."

 

I'm a journalist, and I think Frankie does have a story. She just has to figure out how to present it.

 

The examples of the characters attempting to help each other without success shows just how arbitrary fate was and shows her the enormity of what she and the Jews were up against.

 

I think Emma would agree with Thomas. I think most of the main characters would agree with Thomas.

 

One of the most meaningful stories to me is the one about the French humming resistance. You can just hear it.

 

 

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Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

 

 

Jim Holland tells Frankie she doesn't have a story. Why not? Do you agree? Is Frankie a "collector" on this trip rather than a reporter?

 

I do agree that Frankie doesn't have a story, but what she does have is material for a book.  She is a collector in that she is collecting voices and tidbits that add up (there's Will's phrase again) to the horrors that are happening all around Frankie and the people who are being ignored and disregarded by so much of the world.

 

What stories-or bits of stories--were most meaningful for you?

 

The mother smiling as she leaves her young son to travel on without her, knowing that she will probably never see him again.  Thomas, who almost made it to freedom, being shot in a field.  The young boy getting separated from his mother in the train station.  So sad, heartbreaking really.

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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

[ Edited ]

I have a question -- if you were young during the war and grew up in the United States, do you recall when you first learned about the Holocaust?

 

I grew up in the Midwest and I don't believe it was until I was in my late teens and in college that I so learned.  I remember clearly a paper that a friend was writing and that I couldn't believe.  I do not recall the subject being taught in high school history or sociology.  Nor do I particularly remember the subject from college classes, although I was a techie, in mostly math and science classes.

 

Today, it is incredulous to me that I could have been so naive for so long.  I have always been an avid reader, but somehow I also seemed to not select topics I "wasn't supposed to read" when I look back at my youth -- even if that sometimes surprised my mother and even she thought I'd probably read about something!

 

But, I do worry that many remain naive about genocide as it still occurs around the globe.  At least, in contrast to my experience, when our son did a summer session at a university (Harvard) while he was still in high school, a suite-mate, also a high school student, was taking a series on genocide -- and baseball!

 

 

Problem from Hell  by Samantha Power   (I did not realize her close affiliation with the Obama administration until reading her Wikipedia entry just now -- I knew her name from her work on the topic of genocide at the Carr Center for Human Rights at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.)

 

There are several other writers on the subject.  I hope other readers here will call ones with which they are familiar to our attention.  It is not pleasant reading, but probably a topic we owe ourselves as citizens at least every couple of years.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

Postscript to my previous post:

 

Wednesday night I attended this event:

 

 “Fourteen Stations / Hey Yud Dalet” a drawing suite”

Wednesday, October 14, 6:30 PM, Drawing Center,  35 Wooster Street, NYC


Artist Arie A. Galles and poet Jerome Rothenberg will present a Lecture Presentation/Poetry Reading about their artistic collaboration.  This unique Artist/Poet undertaking consists of Galles’ large format charcoal drawings, and hand lettered Poem/Drawings of Rothenberg’s Gematria poems written for this suite.  Galles’ drawings, based on World War II aerial reconnaissance photographs, map the sites of fourteen Nazi concentration camps.  Rothenberg’s poems are based on the numerical values of each of those camp’s names.  The creation of these works was based on a conviction that, despite its gross insufficiency to express the horrors that took place, art bears a responsibility to confront the Holocaust.  The project’s English title refers to the "Fourteen Stations of the Cross," and to the fact that each concentration camp was established near a railroad station.  The Hebrew title "Hey Yud Dalet," acronym of the Hebrew phrase, "Hashem Yinkom Damam," “May God avenge their blood,” has been carved into the gravestones of Jewish martyrs throughout the centuries.  The presentation will commence with Rothenberg’s reading of the poems against a background of each of the drawings, followed by Galles’ lecture/slide presentation on the genesis of the suite, and its technical, aesthetic and iconographic development.  Galles and Rothenberg will discuss their interaction and collaboration in creating this entity that is larger than the sum of its parts. 

 

If you have a chance to see and hear Galles's and Rothenberg's work, I commend them to you.  Just the stories of obtaining the aerial reconnaissance photographs on which the drawings are based were fascinating, let alone the emotional turmoil and artistic effort to record them. Plus their work with numerology.

 

Rothenberg is an editor of several anthologies of poetry, such as:

 

 

Poems for the Millennium  

Poems for the Millennium  Volume Two

Poems for the Millennium, Volume Three  as well as numerous other books of poetry.

 


 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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MsReaderCP
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎07-10-2009
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

Maybe someone can clarify this for me.


Sheltiemama wrote:

Frankie realizes very quickly that she won't be able to follow one family start to finish and has to adjust her game plan. She's also shaken when she realizes that there won't be enough trains to take everyone to safety.

 

The censors are Germans, and Frankie pushes as far as she can go. I loved it when she hummed the Morse code for the letter V!

 

I love the idea of Frankie capturing the existence of the refugees on the recorder and can almost hear the scratching as she plays back the interviews. People are curious about the recorder. Some don't want to be interviewed and are a little suspicious, but most seem to want their stories recorded. She says America doesn't know what to think and hopes the interviews shapes U.S. opinions.

 

Frankie is swimming in the information rushing at her and is trying to make sense of it all and construct a story out of so many little bits. Hearing the various stories makes me think of the refugees (and those who didn't escape) as individuals instead of as the large mass conjured up by the word "Holocaust."

 

I'm a journalist, and I think Frankie does have a story. She just has to figure out how to present it.

 

The examples of the characters attempting to help each other without success shows just how arbitrary fate was and shows her the enormity of what she and the Jews were up against.

 

I think Emma would agree with Thomas. I think most of the main characters would agree with Thomas.

 

One of the most meaningful stories to me is the one about the French humming resistance. You can just hear it.

 

 


Regarding who the censors were:  At this time she is is France and its my understanding from previous readings (but I thought about it on this question and wondered) that the Germans made French soldiers do the dirty work under their orders.  So I guess the censors would ultimately be the Germans, but I wanted people to know that the French soldiers were involved.  They locked their own people up in these camps.  In France I understand it was not as bad as Germany had gotten,but as we can see from just this book, they were killing people, tearing families apart, taking people from their homes.  I have forgotten WHY the French agreed  to do this with/for the Germans.  I am not a history scholar.  I am sure there had to be German soldiers parading around watching he French soldiers.....(In Sarah's Key, a book that is not as well written as this but is still one you will like if you liked this subject matter, I learned the extent that France has gone to to cover up their involvement in WWII, all countries have things to be ashamed of, we have separate but equal and more, but hiding it does not help anyone.)a side note, I could not help

 

It seemed to me that the people spoke more easily into the recorder that I would have expected.  This did not seem very realistic to me at first.  but they have lost their homes and and all they have left are each other.  How long will they have this?  They need help and fast.  Even then did people  hope that America would hear their cry and come to their rescue?  To a genocide of this size at least. boy did we let them down.

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jbnie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews


Rachel-K wrote:

What are Frankie's immediate surprises on her trip to find the story of the Jewish refugees moving across Europe?

 

Who are the censors, how do they operate, and how does Frankie try to cope with their restrictions?

 

Of what use is the recorder? How do the people on trains respond to it?

 

What is it like for you as a reader to come across so many bits and pieces of these life stories (since unlike Frankie or any of the other characters, we know the history of the Holocaust)? What is your sense of Frankie's exhaustion and confusion? How does this play a role in her reporting?

 

Jim Holland tells Frankie she doesn't have a story. Why not? Do you agree? Is Frankie a "collector" on this trip rather than a reporter?

 

We see a few examples of characters attempting to help each other without any success--Frankie attempting to yell to the young mother about her son, Thomas trying to save Frankie by pulling her away from the windows, Frankie hoping to escort the young boy who has left his mother behind--what effect does this have on the story Frankie is trying to tell about what is happening in Europe?

 

Thomas tells his story of escape, and an old woman says "There was God looking out for you at every turn." Thomas answers "People looked out. Not God. There is not God. Only us." Which of our main characters would agree with Thomas, and which characters would agree with the old woman?

 

What stories-or bits of stories--were most meaningful for you?


 

I think that Frankie went over to what she saw as a glamorous job. It was almost a clerk for her. She was going to work in a brand new field and have a grand adventure.For a  time she did just that. It was fun to be in the thick of things. I think that  the war got real for her during the bombing of London.when the devastation  and the little boy who lost his mother really hit her. People were dying and it was not a game. I believe that this is why she was so annoyed with Will in the shelter later on.

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Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

 

 

The people Frankie encounters on the trains react to the recorder in different ways. Some fear to speak, and remain silent. Others (like Thomas) are eager to tell their stories.

 

 

As a reader to come across bits and pieces of these life stories it is heartbreaking. It brings to mind the many other stories that I have read and heard about in connection with the holocaust. Knowing the bits and pieces is very unsettling and upsetting, as Will insinuated he would find knowing bits of people's stories, and it was on the train rides that Frankie realized just what he meant and just how upsetting & horrifying it was to her to know only the bits of stories without knowing the outcomes of the many people she came across.

 

I think Frankie's first hand experiences with the horrors that people were facing made her better equipped to tell the truth about what was happening to all of these people and better equipped to pass this along to others, who did not understand what was happening in Europe.  the fact that she witnessed these horrors first hand gave her an emotional attachment to the stories and though journalists are "supposed to" report from a strictly objective point of view, I believe that this made her reporting more tangible, real, and immediate to those who heard her.

 

All the stories were moving and you can imagine the voices on the tapes - the effect they would have on a listener. Thomas' story, of course, was terribly upsetting. But the story that moved me the most was the one of the mother and the son on the train - the mother who was sending her son off on his own to escape because she had papers only for him.  This scene made me sob.

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Choisya
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Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

 

At this time she is is France and its my understanding from previous readings (but I thought about it on this question and wondered) that the Germans made French soldiers do the dirty work under their orders.  So I guess the censors would ultimately be the Germans, but I wanted people to know that the French soldiers were involved.  They locked their own people up in these camps.  In France I understand it was not as bad as Germany had gotten,but as we can see from just this book, they were killing people, tearing families apart, taking people from their homes.  I have forgotten WHY the French agreed  to do this with/for the Germans. I am not a history scholar....
Potted history: One of the problems in France was that their government capitulated quite early in the war, soon after the German's invaded but there was nevertheless a high level of resistance to this and many escaped to England and under General de Gaulle became the Free French Army.  Others formed the Resistance Movement in France and fought underground against the Germans - you will have probably seen films about their brave exploits in blowing up railways, rescuing prisoners of war etc.  But those French people who agreed with the capitulation/collaboration, or at least went along with it without much resistance, were put in the situation of having to coooperate with the Germans or be killed themselves, or sent to the death camps.  The French were not alone in this - all the people in the occupied countries had to cooperate with the Germans or risk death.  Ian Kershaw's The Final Solution, details the extent to which there was resistance to Nazism by the Germans, the French, the Poles, and the Austrians etc, who was complicit and who not. I don't think we can judge people who are put in that situation if we have not been under occupation ourselves, particularly if folks had children to protect.   (Sunltcloud has posted a poignant story about her grandmother making her to give a crust of bread to a French officer after Germany was occupied by the Allies....:smileysad:)  

MsReaderCP wrote:

Maybe someone can clarify this for me.


Sheltiemama wrote:

Frankie realizes very quickly that she won't be able to follow one family start to finish and has to adjust her game plan. She's also shaken when she realizes that there won't be enough trains to take everyone to safety.

 

The censors are Germans, and Frankie pushes as far as she can go. I loved it when she hummed the Morse code for the letter V!

 

I love the idea of Frankie capturing the existence of the refugees on the recorder and can almost hear the scratching as she plays back the interviews. People are curious about the recorder. Some don't want to be interviewed and are a little suspicious, but most seem to want their stories recorded. She says America doesn't know what to think and hopes the interviews shapes U.S. opinions.

 

Frankie is swimming in the information rushing at her and is trying to make sense of it all and construct a story out of so many little bits. Hearing the various stories makes me think of the refugees (and those who didn't escape) as individuals instead of as the large mass conjured up by the word "Holocaust."

 

I'm a journalist, and I think Frankie does have a story. She just has to figure out how to present it.

 

The examples of the characters attempting to help each other without success shows just how arbitrary fate was and shows her the enormity of what she and the Jews were up against.

 

I think Emma would agree with Thomas. I think most of the main characters would agree with Thomas.

 

One of the most meaningful stories to me is the one about the French humming resistance. You can just hear it.

 

 


Regarding who the censors were:  At this time she is is France and its my understanding from previous readings (but I thought about it on this question and wondered) that the Germans made French soldiers do the dirty work under their orders.  So I guess the censors would ultimately be the Germans, but I wanted people to know that the French soldiers were involved.  They locked their own people up in these camps.  In France I understand it was not as bad as Germany had gotten,but as we can see from just this book, they were killing people, tearing families apart, taking people from their homes.  I have forgotten WHY the French agreed  to do this with/for the Germans.  I am not a history scholar.  I am sure there had to be German soldiers parading around watching he French soldiers.....(In Sarah's Key, a book that is not as well written as this but is still one you will like if you liked this subject matter, I learned the extent that France has gone to to cover up their involvement in WWII, all countries have things to be ashamed of, we have separate but equal and more, but hiding it does not help anyone.)a side note, I could not help

 

It seemed to me that the people spoke more easily into the recorder that I would have expected.  This did not seem very realistic to me at first.  but they have lost their homes and and all they have left are each other.  How long will they have this?  They need help and fast.  Even then did people  hope that America would hear their cry and come to their rescue?  To a genocide of this size at least. boy did we let them down.


 

 

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Immortal-Spirit
Posts: 143
Registered: ‎03-16-2009
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

I guess she is suprised to find so many people leaving in desperation.  Frankie tries to get past the censors by subtle tricks to get the word back home.  Very resourceful.

 

Frankie may be collecting people's lives because she realized they may not be alive like what happened to Thomas.  She doesn't want them to be forgotten. She wants people to "wake up" and realize what's going on. Frankie doesn't know the whole story yet, but she knows it's not good.

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

 

Thanks for the link to the book. I have added it to my B and N wishlist.

Peppermill wrote:

 

Problem from Hell  by Samantha Power   (I did not realize her close affiliation with the Obama administration until reading her Wikipedia entry just now -- I knew her name from her work on the topic of genocide at the Carr Center for Human Rights at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.)

 

There are several other writers on the subject.  I hope other readers here will call ones with which they are familiar to our attention.  It is not pleasant reading, but probably a topic we owe ourselves as citizens at least every couple of years.

 

 


 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

 

I am not sure what you mean. If the person who died doing heroic feats was the hero and the ones that survived were not, is the implication that they were somehow less?
I think that may be the feeling behind many who lived with guilt their whole lives for having lived while others died. I find it sad to think of them as less than...luck and fate and sometimes their own ingenuity  contrived to save them and they should not be thought ill of, but rather should be considered lucky to have survived to continue on. They were brave and strong too. They were forced to behave like animals in some instances, but none were animals, none started out that way. They were treated so inhumanely, they lost their own humanity briefly. What a testimony it is to them that they were even able to come out of that experience and continue on...

fordmg wrote:

Actually I think Jim Holland was saying that people's stories were not news.  The news was military detachments and who won or lost a battle.  I think Frankie was changing the way news was reported.  Just like in London, it seemed like she was changing the definition of hero.  The antihero was someone who survived, not someone doiong heroic feats.  I think Frankie has a story to tell.  Jim was just living the moment. 

MG

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

Frankie wanted to continue Harriet's legacy by collecting true stories of what was happening to the Jews in Europe. I think Jim was trying to tell Frankie that people need soundbites that direct them to the place you want them to go with the information you provide. He probably felt that collecting so many stories was too diluted an approach and did not make it personal enough, would not let it touch people the way she wanted it to touch them. Too much information is rejected by most people.
However, in retrospect., the people who collected those stories provided the true history of the times. I think Frankie may have been a good enough reporter to collect and then sift out the parts she needed to direct the world's attention to the right place. She was one of the unsung heroes of World War II. There were many real reporters who tried to do just what she did. We often don't give enough credit to the journalists who put themselves in harm's way to expose the truth, whether or not people are listening.
Rachel-K wrote:

 

Jim Holland tells Frankie she doesn't have a story. Why not? Do you agree? Is Frankie a "collector" on this trip rather than a reporter?

 

 


 


 

 

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mamawli
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎03-13-2009
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

I also took the Holocaust Course and remember the many documentaries about the people and their stories.  The Holocausts Museum has several exhibits just reporting the stories of the people which is extremely interesting.  The people are the story and should always be remembered.

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

This is an interesting perspective. If you click on the excerpts from the film, "The Forgotten Jews",  you will learn some interesting facts about what happened to the Jews of the Middle East who no longer live in Arab countries. You will learn the whole story and perhaps it will help some people understand what is happening today in the Middle East by looking back to how they were treated by the Arabs, even during World War II. For some reason, this history has never been publicized. If you want to know the whole story, take the time to view these. I am not taking sides, I am merely asking you to learn more of the facts about the Middle East before you make judgments. You will have to keep an open mind to view these.

 

one

two

three

four

five

 

In case the links don't work, these are the websites:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nwI2hzPjrA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBHc0yvtrDw&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=969cMq8rIzc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYkQlTfWIvc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TJfEf5UMSI&feature=related

 

This video explains that the Arab Mufti met with Hitler to encourage him to continue his policies in the Arab world.

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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

[ Edited ]

 

For some reason, this history has never been publicized.
There was a lot of publicity in newspapers and newsreels at the time of the setting up of the Israeli state on Palestinian land in 1948 which dealt with the activities of the militant Muslim Brotherhood and  Arab League who opposed this decision by the Allies.  Leon Uris' 1958 book Exodus about these times was an international bestseller, as was the 1960s film of the same name.  It is also  important to remember that the Palestinians had an exodus and suffered in these conflicts. Some Palestinians are still in refugee camps. The Arab nations did not agree with the setting up of an Israeli state on what they considered to be Arab land and favoured a settlement in Africa, which was mooted at that time.  This, together with historical prejudices against the Jews, is one of the sources of Middle Eastern conflict in our own times.  The facts around both these exodus are bitterly disputed on both sides.  As for making deals with Hitler, prominent Brits and prominent Americans also did that:smileysad:.  The Mufti's involvement with Hitler was much publicised after the war but the activities of British and American anti-semites, also opposed to the establishment of Israel, was played down as they were often from prominent familes - like our Royals and George Bush's grandfather.          
 


thewanderingjew wrote:

This is an interesting perspective. If you click on the excerpts from the film, "The Forgotten Jews",  you will learn some interesting facts about what happened to the Jews of the Middle East who no longer live in Arab countries. You will learn the whole story and perhaps it will help some people understand what is happening today in the Middle East by looking back to how they were treated by the Arabs, even during World War II. For some reason, this history has never been publicized. If you want to know the whole story, take the time to view these. I am not taking sides, I am merely asking you to learn more of the facts about the Middle East before you make judgments. You will have to keep an open mind to view these.

 

one

two

three

four

five

 

In case the links don't work, these are the websites:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nwI2hzPjrA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBHc0yvtrDw&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=969cMq8rIzc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYkQlTfWIvc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TJfEf5UMSI&feature=related

 

This video explains that the Arab Mufti met with Hitler to encourage him to continue his policies in the Arab world.


 

 

Frequent Contributor
MomforrestMO
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎03-10-2009
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Re: Reporting the Story of the Jews

I like the detail involved. It reminds of Herman Wouk's novel and the story of the Jews leaving Poland.  It is not  as intense but it does let the reader get a glimpse of the uncertainty and horror that the people faced at that time.  It also reminds us that most of America was clueless of these happenings.  I doubt we could be so totally in the dark with today's global news coverage,  In remembering the horrors we can try to see that this history is not repeated.

MomforrestMO