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hookedonbooks09
Posts: 128
Registered: ‎02-04-2009
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Re: In the Wake of Forgiveness: Finding Fault

I think that Father Carew feels guilt.  Possibly that he was not able to better intervene on behalf of the young boys and baby Karel when their mother died. 

 

He gave me the impression of "lurking", rather than "pastoring" throughout the book.  He was always around but not able to exhibit strength enough to help his flock.

 

Barb

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. ~Groucho Marx
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librarians_daughter
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎08-04-2010
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Re: In the Wake of Forgiveness: Finding Fault

Father Carew's role in the book kind of frustrated me, but reading more of everyone else's thoughts kind of gives me a new perspective. It's interesting because he has the best of the intentions in the beginning- he plans to check in on Vaclav and the boys on the pretense of being in the area, but when the time comes for him to step up and intervene on behalf of Karel and the other boys he does not. It seems to be an on going fight- what is the ideal role of a father? Even Father Carew- the ultimate Father behind God himself- failed in his role. It's interesting because though there were no strong, positive father figures, those who themselves became fathers were able to get past that issue and show love to their own children.

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mamawli
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎03-13-2009
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Re: In the Wake of Forgiveness: Finding Fault

Forgiving begins with ones self and for that you must take responsibility for your own actions.  It is easier therefore to find fault with another, than to take responsibility to forgive.  This connects with society today because we would rather place the blame with others, thus finding fault rather than forgiving.