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Peppermill
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Re: Questions for Bruce Machart?

 


Bruce-Machart wrote (edited -- links added for the books Bruce named in his post above to make it easier to find more information.  But these are NOT Bruce's recommendations of a good edition et al. ):

 

Pepper,
Seriously?  Pretty much everything I've ever read!  Particularly?  Hmm...  So, so many...
St. Augustine's Confessions
Elie Wiesel's Night  and Dawn, among others
John Edgar Wideman's Brothers and Keepers
Graham Greene's The Heart of the Matter  and The End of the Affair 
William Maxwell's So Long, See You Tomorrow 
Greek and Elizabethan tragedy, a handful of Biblical and Philosophical scholarship
On and on...
And yours?
Bruce

Peppermill wrote:

Bruce -- what writings have particularly influenced your thinking about forgiveness?

 

Pepper



 

Bruce -- thank you for these.  Other than Wiesel and Augustine, there are none here that I have read, but certainly it is no surprise to see Graham Greene on your list, especially since you already named him as a favored author in an earlier post.

 

There are probably only two that I would immediately name in response to that question, although you are certainly correct that the theme of forgiveness is embedded in much that we read.

 

My two:  Derrida's On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness.  As always, Derrida approaches being unreadable, but his viewpoints here have always seemed so profound as to be worth struggling to comprehend.  Since I feel as if TWoF touches the core of his theses, I was rather curious to see if this showed up on your list.  (Yes, you can perhaps accuse me of a loaded question.  :smileyvery-happy: )

 

Simon Wiesenthal's The Sunflower.  I have read this in at least two editions.  The comments by so many (differing in the two editions), including secular and religious scholars and leaders of diverse faiths, attached to the story so deeply explore when and who can offer forgiveness in what circumstances.

 

More for his work (including its use by peace activists in the wake of genocide and violence) than for this text per se, I will also mention Marshall Rosenberg's Nonviolent Communication

 

It has been said that, when Tolstoy wrote Anna Karenina, he largely ended up "forgiving" her as he developed her character.

 

Pepper

 

PS -- I haven't forgotten your question about the sensory aspects of TWoF.  Just going to take me a bit to be more cogent.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Bruce-Machart
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Re: Questions for Bruce Machart?

 

Dear Pepper,
Thanks so much for the recommendations.  Goodness, I don't think I've picked up Derrida since early in graduate school.  The work gives me fits surpassed only by the phenomenologists!  
And, of course, not mentioning Anna Karenina was a gross oversight on my part.  It is probably the only novel I would consider unassailable as an omniscient narrative (and as a heartbreaker of a story!)  It's really such a shame that most Americans don't read the old Russian masters.  No one has ever rivaled them in terms of narrative virtuosity.  Have you read the story "Misery" by Chekhov?  It slays me.  And with his work we so often experience new insights about forgiveness (and especially self-forgiveness) via dramatic irony.  We understand something that the characters have get to comprehend...but they seem poised on the brink of epiphany nonetheless.  Beautiful.
As for my teachers, you might try Lee Abbott's recently issued "selected" stories, _All Things All At Once_.  He's a big of an acquired taste...many of his 1st-person narrators sound quite a lot alike, which is troublesome only if you read several of them in a row.  But he takes great pleasure stretching his lyricism to interesting ends.  Melanie Rae writes both novels and stories, and they've become more and more challenging over the years.  She's had several stories in the _Best American Short Stories_ series, and she is a writer of striking compassion and insight.  I LOVE the novel, _Iona Moon_ and the story collection, _First, Body_.

Warmest regards,
Bruce




Peppermill wrote:

 


Bruce-Machart wrote (edited -- links added for the books Bruce named in his post above to make it easier to find more information.  But these are NOT Bruce's recommendations of a good edition et al. ):

 

Pepper,
Seriously?  Pretty much everything I've ever read!  Particularly?  Hmm...  So, so many...
St. Augustine's Confessions
Elie Wiesel's Night  and Dawn, among others
John Edgar Wideman's Brothers and Keepers
Graham Greene's The Heart of the Matter  and The End of the Affair 
William Maxwell's So Long, See You Tomorrow 
Greek and Elizabethan tragedy, a handful of Biblical and Philosophical scholarship
On and on...
And yours?
Bruce

Peppermill wrote:

Bruce -- what writings have particularly influenced your thinking about forgiveness?

 

Pepper



 

Bruce -- thank you for these.  Other than Wiesel and Augustine, there are none here that I have read, but certainly it is no surprise to see Graham Greene on your list, especially since you already named him as a favored author in an earlier post.

 

There are probably only two that I would immediately name in response to that question, although you are certainly correct that the theme of forgiveness is embedded in much that we read.

 

My two:  Derrida's On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness.  As always, Derrida approaches being unreadable, but his viewpoints here have always seemed so profound as to be worth struggling to comprehend.  Since I feel as if TWoF touches the core of his theses, I was rather curious to see if this showed up on your list.  (Yes, you can perhaps accuse me of a loaded question.  :smileyvery-happy: )

 

Simon Wiesenthal's The Sunflower.  I have read this in at least two editions.  The comments by so many (differing in the two editions), including secular and religious scholars and leaders of diverse faiths, attached to the story so deeply explore when and who can offer forgiveness in what circumstances.

 

More for his work (including its use by peace activists in the wake of genocide and violence) than for this text per se, I will also mention Marshall Rosenberg's Nonviolent Communication

 

It has been said that, when Tolstoy wrote Anna Karenina, he largely ended up "forgiving" her as he developed her character.

 

Pepper

 

PS -- I haven't forgotten your question about the sensory aspects of TWoF.  Just going to take me a bit to be more cogent.

 

 


 

www.brucemachart.com
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Bruce-Machart
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Registered: ‎07-21-2010
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Rocky Mountain High

 

Hello, everyone!

 

I just wanted to check in here and let you all know that my participation may be a bit limited over the next two days.  I'm going to participate in the "Author Breakfast" at the Mountains and Plains Independent Bookseller Association trade show in Denver.  I will be traveling today, speaking at the convention tomorrow, and back home late tomorrow night.  

 

That said, I will be eager to get back in the mix with all of you on Friday morning, so please...if I haven't exhausted you with my lengthy answers, please fire away!

 

Happy reading,

 

Bruce

www.brucemachart.com
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: Rocky Mountain High

So Glad Bruce ,that I saw your post..I wanted to let you know,how much "The Wake Of Forgiveness ",gave me hours of reading such a near perfect account,of how our Country was forming itself during that time frame,My interest was The immigrant's  that arrived,their differences,yet the same ,and your portrayal of Karel..It was as you know a very intense portrait of America,but the last part of the book,which was certainly paced well for me,it was like watching a movie,all the frames,back and forth,and then the emotions..Seeing and reading about Karel,his brothers.Was enough closure for know,and how beautifully you slipped Hildi into the scene...When I closed the book..I could've been walking out of Movie Theater. Bruce,tissue in my hand....It was the Trailer Bruce that gave me that Fantasy...Much Success  Will look for your new book and Maybe ,a sequel to TWOF'''Best Susan VT

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Questions for Bruce Machart?

 


Bruce-Machart wrote (excerpt):

 

....It's really such a shame that most Americans don't read the old Russian masters.  No one has ever rivaled them in terms of narrative virtuosity.  Have you read the story "Misery" by Chekhov?  It slays me.  And with his work we so often experience new insights about forgiveness (and especially self-forgiveness) via dramatic irony.  We understand something that the characters have get to comprehend...but they seem poised on the brink of epiphany nonetheless.  Beautiful.

 

Bruce -- Thanks for calling Chekhov's "Misery" to our attention!  I had not read it, but having done so, I doubt I shall ever forget it.  I recommend it to whomever reads this post.  It is less than 3 10-pt type pages.  The link is to a translation by Constance Garnett. (Be careful if you print it not to lose some key lines.)

 

(We did discuss some twelve or so of Chekhov's stories on the Epic, Etc. board a couple of years ago.  But this one I am sure will be the most memorable for me.  I have already shared it with a considerable number of people -- all trained to be present and to listen.)

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Bruce-Machart
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Registered: ‎07-21-2010
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Re: Questions for Bruce Machart?

You're welcome, Pepper!  That has long been one of my favorites!

 

 


Peppermill wrote:

 


Bruce-Machart wrote (excerpt):

 

....It's really such a shame that most Americans don't read the old Russian masters.  No one has ever rivaled them in terms of narrative virtuosity.  Have you read the story "Misery" by Chekhov?  It slays me.  And with his work we so often experience new insights about forgiveness (and especially self-forgiveness) via dramatic irony.  We understand something that the characters have get to comprehend...but they seem poised on the brink of epiphany nonetheless.  Beautiful.

 

Bruce -- Thanks for calling Chekhov's "Misery" to our attention!  I had not read it, but having done so, I doubt I shall ever forget it.  I recommend it to whomever reads this post.  It is less than 3 10-pt type pages.  The link is to a translation by Constance Garnett. (Be careful if you print it not to lose some key lines.)

 

(We did discuss some twelve or so of Chekhov's stories on the Epic, Etc. board a couple of years ago.  But this one I am sure will be the most memorable for me.  I have already shared it with a considerable number of people -- all trained to be present and to listen.)

 

Pepper


 

www.brucemachart.com
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Bruce-Machart
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Readings in Mississippi!

Are any of our "First Look" friends out there from Mississippi?

 

I'm giving three "pre-publication" readings next week--in Oxford (Tuesday), Jackson (Wednesday), and Greenwood (Thursday).

 

If anyone can make it, it would be a thrill to meet you in person!

 

And that goes for each and every one of you, should my book tour get me to a city near you!  Please do come and introduce yourselves!  I would love to see you.

 

Warmest thanks and regards,

 

Bruce

www.brucemachart.com
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Sadie1
Posts: 74
Registered: ‎07-16-2009
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Re: Readings in Mississippi!

Bruce, I would love to hear one of your readings in the Atlanta, GA area.  Do you know if and when you will be passing through here?

 

I very much enjoyed your book and have recommended it to many people.

 

I wasn't able to participate very much on the discussions due to medical issues at the time.  I am well now and gosh would have loved to discuss some of this book wtih you.  Great job on this book!

 

Thank you!

 

Lisa in Georgia

Author
Bruce-Machart
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎07-21-2010
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Re: Readings in Mississippi!

Thanks, Sadie, and I hope that you are feeling better.

 

Right now, I'm not getting very close to Atlanta, though I wish I were.  My fiancee's parents live there, so clearly I would love to visit.  Please check my website from time to time for updates...if the book sells reasonably well, they might add some cities to my tour!

 

Warmest regards,

 

Bruce


Sadie1 wrote:

Bruce, I would love to hear one of your readings in the Atlanta, GA area.  Do you know if and when you will be passing through here?

 

I very much enjoyed your book and have recommended it to many people.

 

I wasn't able to participate very much on the discussions due to medical issues at the time.  I am well now and gosh would have loved to discuss some of this book wtih you.  Great job on this book!

 

Thank you!

 

Lisa in Georgia


 

www.brucemachart.com
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JSkellington
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Registered: ‎01-21-2010
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Re: Questions for Bruce Machart?

I want to apologize for not participating more in this forum. I got very sick and have not had internet access for some time. Hopefully all is well now and I can participate again. I realize this book is finished and I am trying to get caught up for the next one. I truly enjoyed Wake of Forgiveness and would recommend it to anyone that enjoys reading. I will post a complete review on the book's page tonight.

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dhaupt
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Bruce Machart?

 


JSkellington wrote:

I want to apologize for not participating more in this forum. I got very sick and have not had internet access for some time. Hopefully all is well now and I can participate again. I realize this book is finished and I am trying to get caught up for the next one. I truly enjoyed Wake of Forgiveness and would recommend it to anyone that enjoys reading. I will post a complete review on the book's page tonight.


I'm glad you're better, hope to see you at the next one.