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Frequent Contributor
fordmg
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel


babzilla41 wrote:

Karel's wife has already arrived at Thom house with their children. Why?

 

I've been thinking further on this question... Maybe Sophia figured that enough was enough as far as Karel and his brothers' estrangement was concerned.  Maybe she thought if she went to Thom and Graciela's, it would force Karel to come looking for them when he realized she and the children had left Praha, and by coming, would force the brothers to "break the ice".  It seems that it was Karel, not the brothers, who held a grudge in the years following their father's death.  Thom said, "You ain't seen reason to do much of anything within spitting distance of us since Pop died...."

 

b


I think this is the closest idea for why Sophia came to the fire.  I am just currious as to how she got there.  Someone had to bring her and the kids.

MG

Contributor
FireRaven9
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎12-18-2009

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

The reunion of the boys at the fire was sort of what I expected, and somewhat not. I kind of expected there to be a bit of a fight, considering the trouble Raymond and Joe had been in with Thom and their connection to Karel. I was a little surprised this didn't blow up into at least a verbal argument. Even when Villasenor showed up and started in on Karel, the scene remained pretty calm. I suppose they all suspected that Raymond and Joe were acting mostly of their own will when causing the trouble.

 

I do think it's a little ironic, the relationship between the three older brothers and Villasenor. Throughout the book I got a sense of the jealousy of Karel, that the older brothers were able to escape the grasp of their father. He seemed to hold that jealousy even after Vaclav's death. After the barn fire, when Villasenor began shooting out orders to the three older brothers, I think Karel realized that the boys escaped one hell only to be cast into another. I think, in the end, Karel is the one who really escaped and I feel like he realized it at that moment.

 

Sophie was already at Thom's house because that's the way things were typically done back then. When trouble found someone, the community pulled together to help them out. It was natural for the women to look after another and their children in times of crisis.

 

The difference between the gatherings of the towns people really depends on the events. People have their differences and like to gossip and, in this case, gamble and bet against each other. But when a crisis is involved people tend to soften a little and pull together.

Wordsmith
babzilla41
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎05-04-2009
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel


fordmg wrote:

babzilla41 wrote:

Karel's wife has already arrived at Thom house with their children. Why?

 

I've been thinking further on this question... Maybe Sophia figured that enough was enough as far as Karel and his brothers' estrangement was concerned.  Maybe she thought if she went to Thom and Graciela's, it would force Karel to come looking for them when he realized she and the children had left Praha, and by coming, would force the brothers to "break the ice".  It seems that it was Karel, not the brothers, who held a grudge in the years following their father's death.  Thom said, "You ain't seen reason to do much of anything within spitting distance of us since Pop died...."

 

b


I think this is the closest idea for why Sophia came to the fire.  I am just currious as to how she got there.  Someone had to bring her and the kids.

MG


Elizka Novotny brought her!

"I love books. If I could eat them, I would. I love their scent and often put my nose in to inhale their aroma." - Kathleen Grissom
Frequent Contributor
Mysterylover1138
Posts: 114
Registered: ‎03-01-2010

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Maybe it is just me, and it seems like it is by what people have posted in there thoughts on here, but I might be one of the only people who didn't like the book.  I thought that the characters were developed beautifully, but I couldn't really find myself relating to a single one of them throughout the book.  I found myself having a hard time getting into the book in the beginning, but after a few chapters I was able to start getting into the scenes and the passion of the book, but I was unable to really find myself getting into the novel because I couldn't relate to the characters. 

 

Did anyone else feel this way? Or am I truly the only one?

Scribe
ReadingPatti
Posts: 2,524
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Mysterylover11, I can't really say I disliked it. I just was bother by many things. One was the going back and forth to past and present. For me it disputed the flow of the story.

 

The abuse that went on was disgusting for me. The characters especialy Vaclav had no redeeming qualities. Karel was not far behind. To get drunk and make out with another woman when your wife was having a baby was disgusting.

 

This family had problems.Many many problems.

 

I though Bruce did write good, but the whole was disturbing. This was the First Look Book that I did not like. I have enjoyed every one until this one. I will not recommend this book.

 

ReadingPatti

Frequent Contributor
ruthieWW
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎01-07-2010
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I agree with you. I did enjoy reading the book, but was unsatisfied with the development of the characters and the ending.

Inspired Contributor
nymazz
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎09-14-2009
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel


Rachel-K wrote:

Describe the scene between the Skala brothers in the wake of the fire. Is this the reunion you expected between the boys? What does their interaction tell you about their history and their relationships to each other now?

I thought the porch scene was written perfectly.  The interaction started out cautious but eventually you sensed they were starting to feel comfortable being in each others company once again.  The tragedy of the fire and Thoms daughter getting hurt gave them the perfect opportunity to begin to mend their relationship.

 

What do you make of Villasenor's arrival and his interactions with his daughter's husbands?

Karels brothers were no better off then if they never left their fathers home, Villasenor seemed just as unkind and demanding as their father.  I think Karel must have breathed a sigh of relief it wasn't him. I think that up until that moment Karel might have been some what jealous of his brothers, thinking they were better off but after witnessing Villasenors treatment of his brothers I think he felt sorry for them.

 

Karel's wife has already arrived at Thom house with their children. Why? What does the scene inside the household tell us about this community, about the lives of the women in this community?

There was definitely a stronger bond between many of the women in the town, then the men had with each other. The women supported each other more during difficult times, the men were very competitive.

Karel seemed very surprised that his brother knew his wife and children and that he even complimented Sophie for being a caring woman.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are. -Mason Cooley-
Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,843
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

 


ReadingPatti wrote:

Mysterylover11, I can't really say I disliked it. I just was bother by many things. One was the going back and forth to past and present. For me it disputed the flow of the story.

 

The abuse that went on was disgusting for me. The characters especialy Vaclav had no redeeming qualities. Karel was not far behind. To get drunk and make out with another woman when your wife was having a baby was disgusting.

 

This family had problems.Many many problems.

 

I though Bruce did write good, but the whole was disturbing. This was the First Look Book that I did not like. I have enjoyed every one until this one. I will not recommend this book.

 

ReadingPatti


 

Ahh, Patti.

Little did you know that just by saying this you're recommending the novel, well you would have to me anyway, that would be my red flag to get the book because it obviously made you "feel".

 

You see that's what fiction is to me, it's all about evoking emotions, some bad and some good and it's all about the telling of the story. If the author can tell me a hard story to swallow but do it with incredible narrative and wonderfully developed characters then that's all I need. And Bruce did that with this book.

CAG
Inspired Correspondent
CAG
Posts: 218
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

 


dhaupt wrote:

 


ReadingPatti wrote:

Mysterylover11, I can't really say I disliked it. I just was bother by many things. One was the going back and forth to past and present. For me it disputed the flow of the story.

 

The abuse that went on was disgusting for me. The characters especialy Vaclav had no redeeming qualities. Karel was not far behind. To get drunk and make out with another woman when your wife was having a baby was disgusting.

 

This family had problems.Many many problems.

 

I though Bruce did write good, but the whole was disturbing. This was the First Look Book that I did not like. I have enjoyed every one until this one. I will not recommend this book.

 

ReadingPatti


 

Ahh, Patti.

Little did you know that just by saying this you're recommending the novel, well you would have to me anyway, that would be my red flag to get the book because it obviously made you "feel".

 

You see that's what fiction is to me, it's all about evoking emotions, some bad and some good and it's all about the telling of the story. If the author can tell me a hard story to swallow but do it with incredible narrative and wonderfully developed characters then that's all I need. And Bruce did that with this book.


I completely agree. Excellent point!

 

CAG
Distinguished Correspondent
JaneM
Posts: 152
Registered: ‎02-01-2008
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel


Fozzie wrote:

Rachel-K wrote:

What do you make of Villasenor's arrival and his interactions with his daughter's husbands?


This was one of my favorite parts of the book.  It was good as a reader, and good for Karel too, to realize that the grass is not always greener.  What we had assumed, that Karel's brothers were better off than he was, was not necessarily true.  It was one of those moments when new information makes me rethink the entire book and some of the assumptions I had made.


I agree with you completely, Fozzie.  This was an important section to me in that it reinforced the whole concept of independence that Karel had achieved (possibly unbeknownst to him) versus the "grass is greener" view that he had of his brothers' lives.

Jane M.
Contributor
MarabPillot
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I just finished reading the book and thought it was excellent! I found it difficult to really get into the book at times and it took me longer than most books to finish it. Not that it wasn't beautifully written, it just is not the usual quick reads that I pick up.

 

It's not the usual type of book that I like to read but am glad that I decided to participate in the First Look book club and read this type of book. I found some of the parts of the book difficult to read as there were some brutal parts but knew that they were essential to the story line.

 

While it wasn't my kind of book, I would glady recommend it to others. My husband has just started reading it and is enjoying it.

 

~Mara

Contributor
MarabPillot
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

CAG,

that is an excellent point that you make and i never have thought about books that way.i have had strong reactions to books and told people that they should not read something because it made me mad at the characters or disturbed me in some way. but what it did was cause me to react which what you want any book you read to do....if it's boring and you can't remember anything about the book, why read it?

i am now thinking of books i have not recommended in a new way :smileyhappy:

~Mara

Correspondent
mamawli
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎03-13-2009
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I'm appreciative of the opportunity that Barnes & Noble has afforded me to read The Wake of Forgiveness; however, I found it quite difficult to read and to digest more than a chapter or two at a time.

 

The author writes very well and deserves accolades for his descriptive and vivid vocabulary.  He created characters that I loved to hate. 

 

While reading this novel, I felt as though I was back in school and reading a novel that was good for me, but chosen by someone who used different criteria for the book selection.

Scribe
ReadingPatti
Posts: 2,524
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

dhaupt, What can I say? It was just not the book for me. I agree that books are meant to make you feel, happy, sad, and many other emotions. So I guess my review and views did backfire on me. I just wanted to express what I thought of the book.

 

I think Bruce does write really well. I was just distressed over the subject and the characters themselves. Abuse is hard for me to get over. I can't beleive that a father would do that to his children.

 

I am glad that I read it. I may not have enjoyed it but it was an adventure. As you said that what books do, may you feel and think.

 

ReadingPatti

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,843
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

 


ReadingPatti wrote:

dhaupt, What can I say? It was just not the book for me. I agree that books are meant to make you feel, happy, sad, and many other emotions. So I guess my review and views did backfire on me. I just wanted to express what I thought of the book.

 

I think Bruce does write really well. I was just distressed over the subject and the characters themselves. Abuse is hard for me to get over. I can't beleive that a father would do that to his children.

 

I am glad that I read it. I may not have enjoyed it but it was an adventure. As you said that what books do, may you feel and think.

 

ReadingPatti


 

I'm glad you read it too and I agree the abuse was hard to read.

I hope the next one will make you happy.

See you at General Fiction for the October read Patti

Distinguished Correspondent
Lil_Irish_Lass
Posts: 163
Registered: ‎11-21-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I actually really liked TWoF... even though I didn't like the story (if that makes any sense). The writing was some of the best I've seen out of any First Look novel and I was definitely dragged in to life in Texas at the early part of the 1900s. All of the violence, anger, deprivation, and disloyalty to marriage, while unappealing, is historically accurate.

 

Life was very different "back then" and for most of history being faithful to your spouse was only held to the female to uphold. Men slept around and had mistresses and it was socially acceptable.

I will say, that I didn't enjoy the ending of TWoF... for some reason it came across as hopeful to me and that jarred with the rest of the novel. Then again, I also despise open endings. I like closure so any ending left up to my imagination would be disappointing.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"No sensible man ever engages, unprepared, in a fencing match of words with a woman." - The Woman in White
Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel


CAG wrote:

 


dhaupt wrote:

 


ReadingPatti wrote:

Mysterylover11, I can't really say I disliked it. I just was bother by many things. One was the going back and forth to past and present. For me it disputed the flow of the story.

 

The abuse that went on was disgusting for me. The characters especialy Vaclav had no redeeming qualities. Karel was not far behind. To get drunk and make out with another woman when your wife was having a baby was disgusting.

 

This family had problems.Many many problems.

 

I though Bruce did write good, but the whole was disturbing. This was the First Look Book that I did not like. I have enjoyed every one until this one. I will not recommend this book.

 

ReadingPatti


 

Ahh, Patti.

Little did you know that just by saying this you're recommending the novel, well you would have to me anyway, that would be my red flag to get the book because it obviously made you "feel".

 

You see that's what fiction is to me, it's all about evoking emotions, some bad and some good and it's all about the telling of the story. If the author can tell me a hard story to swallow but do it with incredible narrative and wonderfully developed characters then that's all I need. And Bruce did that with this book.


I completely agree. Excellent point!

 


I belong to a book club from my public library and our best discussions are with a book that either upsets the participants or that nobody liked.    It's all about evoking emotions.

Scribe
ReadingPatti
Posts: 2,524
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

dhaupt, Deb,I have read the Daugthers of Witching Hill. I really liked it. I am so ready to discuss it.

 

ReadingPatti

Frequent Contributor
sarah_in_ca
Posts: 42
Registered: ‎09-28-2009
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

After the barn fire, the brothers reunite for the first time in a long time.  Karel seems to be the uniter even though he has suffered more than the others at the hands of their father.  I don't know how he continues to rise above the deep anger, hate, and resentment that must be inside him somewhere, but he does.  The brothers are very hesitant about being together and hardly know what to say to each other.  They have been conditioned by not only their own father, but also their wives' father, Villasenor.

 

Karel's wife is not hampered by the past that the brothers have endured.  She reaches out as any woman would in a time of disaster in the community.  Having her there inside the household allows Karel to focus on family and healing.

 

Karel is the lucky brother who was able to live his own life by being left out, while his brothers traded one controlling father for another controlling father-in-law.

Inspired Correspondent
nfam
Posts: 231
Registered: ‎01-08-2007
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Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

You're definitely not the only one to be disappointed in this book. I, too, found the descriptive prose well done. However, the brutality turned me off. I found the extensive use of flashbacks difficult to follow and disruptive on the tension. The brutal scenes with the horses were dreadful. The characters didn't have any particular redeeming characteristics, so I was left with the prose. In some books that's enough, but I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone who loved horses.


Mysterylover1138 wrote:

Maybe it is just me, and it seems like it is by what people have posted in there thoughts on here, but I might be one of the only people who didn't like the book.  I thought that the characters were developed beautifully, but I couldn't really find myself relating to a single one of them throughout the book.  I found myself having a hard time getting into the book in the beginning, but after a few chapters I was able to start getting into the scenes and the passion of the book, but I was unable to really find myself getting into the novel because I couldn't relate to the characters. 

 

Did anyone else feel this way? Or am I truly the only one?