Reply
Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)


Peppermill wrote:

I see the word “evil” bandied about in the discussions here of TWoF.  “Evil,” like “sin” and “truth,” has always seemed one of those strong words, certainly not without meaning, but hard to cleanly identify.  So what are the candidates for “evil” in TWoF?

Burning the barn, destroying property and animals.

Subjecting young boys to pulling a plow to the extent they are physically deformed for life.

Drunkenness and abuse.

Using a horserace to determine the marriages of one’s daughters

Kicking a heifer such that she fails to calve.

Failing to call a midwife in a timely manner.

Placing one’s property in the care of irresponsible teenagers.

Fickleness and jealousy among neighbors.

Bootlegging during Prohibition.

Whoring.

Adultery.

Keeping and pampering race horses when work horses are needed.

Hoof and mouth disease up on the Panhandle.  (Probably largely considered disease, not evil, even in 1924, yet is there "truth" in a more medieval view?)

The stench from tanning and slaughterhouse operations.

Questionable banking negotiations.

Slurs towards others of different backgrounds.  (One of the few times I laughed at the description of spit! p. 14)

War and its impact on young men.

Using a crop to the face of another to win a race.

Dropping a tree branch low to influence a race.

Failure as an adult to act responsibly towards others, regardless of one’s own experiences.

Failure to express love and kindness.

 

Most probably would not apply the word “evil” to all of these and there are probably significant possibilities for its application from the book not included here.  These are only intended to possibly provoke a discussion probing the “meaning” or significance of “evil” a bit, at least within the scope of TWoF.  Do we have guesses as to the author’s intent?  Does that matter, or more so, our reactions as readers?

 

Probably reading Purge at the same time and having recently finished Sarah's Key  prompt me to post these rather outrageous questions.  Please feel free to ignore.

 

Pepper


I don't think of actions as evil, but of people as evil. 

 

From dictionary.com:

 

–adjective

1.
morally wrong or bad; immoral; wicked: evil deeds; an evil life.
2.
harmful; injurious: evil laws.
3.
characterized or accompanied by misfortune or suffering; unfortunate; disastrous: to be fallen on evil days.
4.
due to actual or imputed bad conduct or character: an evil reputation.
5.
marked by anger, irritability, irascibility, etc.: He is known for his evil disposition.
 
I think many of the people in the book were evil.  Certainly they were immoral and wicked, as in definition number one.
 
I wonder if this is why they are not sympathetic characters.  I think people are quite tolerant and forgiving of ordinary (not evil) people making mistakes, but people are not tolerant of people without any moral compass who intnetionally do harm..
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

[ Edited ]

Laura -- my inclinations are different.

 

I hesitate to label any individual as "evil," but I think individuals, groups, and institutions all do "evil" actions, in the sense of actions which may be harmful or injurious of others -- or, perhaps, even, of themselves.

 

Pepper


Fozzie wrote:
I don't think of actions as evil, but of people as evil. 

 

From dictionary.com:

 

–adjective

1.
morally wrong or bad; immoral; wicked: evil deeds; an evil life.
2.
harmful; injurious: evil laws.
3.
characterized or accompanied by misfortune or suffering; unfortunate; disastrous: to be fallen on evil days.
4.
due to actual or imputed bad conduct or character: an evil reputation.
5.
marked by anger, irritability, irascibility, etc.: He is known for his evil disposition.
 
I think many of the people in the book were evil.  Certainly they were immoral and wicked, as in definition number one.
 
I wonder if this is why they are not sympathetic characters.  I think people are quite tolerant and forgiving of ordinary (not evil) people making mistakes, but people are not tolerant of people without any moral compass who intnetionally do harm..

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

I think it had to do with the beer competition. They wanted to stake a claim in the business, but were stepping on Thomas' toes. I got the feeling Joe, and probably Raymond, were running away as well.

 


Madgy wrote:

Hey everyone,

   Does anyone know why Thomas shot Joe because he wasn't armed?  Perhaps I missed the reason.   Thanks 


 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
CAG
Inspired Correspondent
CAG
Posts: 218
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

 


JaneM wrote:

Rachel-K wrote:

Love so many of the observations in this thread!

 

Writing this visceral and complex can be demanding. "Unsettling" is a great word for it. Maybe it's especially surprising for those of us who read a lot and read quickly? You get used to flying through pages. And here we are, reading over the cereal bowl, or with a radio or television on--and get hit by pages that actually make us stop whatever else is happening because we need to give it our whole attention.

 

 

 


To continue with this discussion on descriptive writing, I would agree with you, Rachel, that  when I read, I sometimes skip a lot to chase the plot narrative.  This is particularly true for me with fast paced books, such as "The Girl" series by Stieg Larrson, or books by Dan Brown.  It's all about the story and what will be unfolded next.  And in most cases, you have haven't missed much by flipping pages.  But this book is quite different.  It's a challenge to the reader to get the most out of it.  Every word, every phrase has significant meaning and a beauty unto itself.  We saw a little of this type of writing in Under This Unbroken Sky, but certainly not to the extent that Bruce provides. 

 

Reading it is almost a mind game, to piece together the clues that are tossed out here and there about something that happened in the past, while reading a story line that is happening now.  Like in the movie Momento or Inception, the viewer wants to see it again and maybe again, to find what they missed the first time through so they finally have a complete picture.

 

This is a book that bears re-reading several times, to enjoy the descriptive passages (or skipping over those that are too brutal -- like you do when you peak through your fingers covering your eyes in a really scary movie!), or to piece together the timeline and puzzle out the motivations of the characters from scenes that have not yet been revealed. 

 

It's not often that I experience a book that I would like to re-read, but this is definitely one that is worthy of that compliment.


This is a book I have already started reading again. I am going slower, taking my time and enjoying it. I must say I am not given to reading many books more than once either. This is one that I feel I will gain from the experience of reading it again. I liked your comments JaneM!

 

CAG
Inspired Contributor
BDonnelly
Posts: 47
Registered: ‎04-22-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

I am having a lot of difficulty relating to these characters and their stupidity and brutality.  This is generally not the kind of book I read.  I can do pain but it has to be pain with a point - somebody grows, learns something, something changes.

 

I don't see a change in Vaclav with the breakfast scene.  He is still awful toward them - menacing and expecting more of them than children can do.  He is using them already in that he is asking the older boys to care for the youngest which might not have been unusual then but he is threatening and violent. 

 

I believe Karel turns his truck around because watching the duo hunt he is reminded of how things could be and he decided to do the right thing.  He seems to know the right thing to do in many situations but unable to do the right thing.

 

Sophie's teasing lets us know that there is some ease in their relationship.  I would like to see this differentiates him from his father but his father also showed kindness and warmth towards Karel's mother.

I think Karel hires the twins so that he can stay in town with Sophie and do the right thing by his family.  He feels an affinity to them because they are orphaned children with a connection through their mother.

Frequent Contributor
Madgy
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)


dhaupt wrote:

 


Madgy wrote:

Hey everyone,

   Does anyone know why Thomas shot Joe because he wasn't armed?  Perhaps I missed the reason.   Thanks 


You know I wondered that too until I remembered that it was in the back of his shoulder and maybe he couldn't tell them apart and thought he shot Raymond. Or maybe he didn't care which one he shot and did it to make a point.

 


That's true about perhaps he couldn't tell them apart, I hadn't thought of that.  All I kept thinking was if someone was going to shoot one of them for any reason it would be Raymond.  Joe just seems to me to be the quiet follower.

Thanks dhaupt!!!

Frequent Contributor
EiLvReedn
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎05-25-2007

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

You always want what you can't have. You always need what you can't afford. The Grass is always greener on the other side, green w/ envy, etc, etc, etc, that's how all these characters seem to me.

Contributor
lrloveless71
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎12-09-2009

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

We open with our only childhood scene so far after the first pages of the novel. Does Vaclav become more "human" for us, if not more humane, toward his boys? We get, for example, an image of Vaclav making breakfast for the young boys and watching them eat, warning them to be careful with their mother's dishes. How does such a scene fit with the man who would put yokes on his sons for plowing? 

 

I think that the scene does help us see a human side of Vaclav. He loves his boys but is so broken by the loss of their mother that he become wrapped up in the intensity of the labor of the farm. He sees the boys as possessions and labor rather than children, his broken heart prevent him from being a loving or nurturing father.

 

Why does Karel turn his truck around after watching a boy and his father hunt along the roadside?

 

The boy and his father hunting reminds him of his own family and helps him to consider the father he wants to be to his son especially. Very different front his father but also a perfectionist in the activity. He considers what the boy is doing wrong and how he will teach his boy to be a good hunter.

 

What does Sophie's teasing of him tell us about their relationship?

 

Sophie understands her husband more than even he realizes. Her teasing shows us that she is less serious and more loving of him.

 

 

Wordsmith
BookWoman718
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎01-28-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)


BDonnelly wrote:

I think Karel hires the twins so that he can stay in town with Sophie and do the right thing by his family.  He feels an affinity to them because they are orphaned children with a connection through their mother.


When I re-read that part, it seemed to me that Karel hires the boys on an impulse because he can then stay on in town (while Sophie is otherwise occupied having the baby)  and connive another tryst with Elizka.  He was already thinking about her, even as they drove into town as a family, and his devil-may-care shout to the churchgoers,  "..... and I'll dance with your daughters!"  doesn't sound like a man who was going to be anywhere near the birthing room. (As of course, men never were, until the last few decades.  The old stereotype of expectant fathers pacing in the waiting room was partially true, but as these things often take many hours, no small number of the fathers went out for a meal or drinks, or to get some work done in the meantime.  Birthing a child was women's work;  the father was called in when it was all done, and the bloody messes tidied away out of sight.) 

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

 


Madgy wrote:

dhaupt wrote:

 


Madgy wrote:

Hey everyone,

   Does anyone know why Thomas shot Joe because he wasn't armed?  Perhaps I missed the reason.   Thanks 


You know I wondered that too until I remembered that it was in the back of his shoulder and maybe he couldn't tell them apart and thought he shot Raymond. Or maybe he didn't care which one he shot and did it to make a point.

 


That's true about perhaps he couldn't tell them apart, I hadn't thought of that.  All I kept thinking was if someone was going to shoot one of them for any reason it would be Raymond.  Joe just seems to me to be the quiet follower.

Thanks dhaupt!!!


 

 

I agree that they were probably identical twins and Thomas couldn't tell them apart and/or that he didn't care which one he shot; it was just to make a point.  If identical, he might have thought that they moved and acted as one so it didn't matter which twin got the shot.  When Joe says, "You didn't have to spit on the man's floor, Ray."  Ray responded "I suppose I didn't.  I might have spit in his face instead."  What a low life that Raymond is!

 

I remember reading about the two signs in the saloon "no spitting" and "no gambling" and thinking there were spitoons for the spitting but why tables and chairs set up in a saloon where drinking and gambling went hand in hand?

Wordsmith
BookWoman718
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎01-28-2007

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

Pepper and Fozzie,

 

Another interesting discussion you've raised, Pepper!   Is it the action or the perpetrator that is 'evil' ?   Your take on it seems to follow the Church adage, Love the sinner, but hate the sin, which is I think easier for a religious or god-like entity to adhere to than it is for us spouses, family members, neighbors, and business associates who must serve as formal or informal prosecutors, defenders, judges, and juries sometimes.

 

Personally, many of the actions you list I would see as transgressions that don't rise to the level of evil, which in my mind is something that is done purposefully to inflict serious, permanent or long-term damage on someone.  It follows that harnessing your children to a plow so frequently that they are disfigured, is evil.   I think Karel's treatment of Elizka is evil, in that he uses her in a cavalier and unfeeling way, and, with a smirk,  leaves her with the possibility of an unwanted pregnancy. The burning of a barn with animals inside would strike most people, I think, as something evil, even if human life were not endangered thereby. 

 

In this context, we also have to consider some distinctions that the law has tried to make with such subcategores as manslaughter or reckless endangerment, in which the full intention to harm was not present, but the end result was grievous damage anyway.  Your listing of banking irregularities is timely.  They come in all sizes!  Often, 'no one' is damaged, in that insurance makes up for losses (so the only damage is to our insurance rates and taxes)  But the kind of crazy wild banking that led to the current deep recession has 'robbed' innocent people, and no doubt killed some too, who were left without insurance from a lost job  or were forced into risky behavior that they otherwise could have avoided.  Evil?   Or just reckless endangerment of an entire economy, so that some people could get even more fabulously wealthy?  How deep does the damage have to be before recklessness is actually evil? 

 

Whoring is sometimes called a victimless crime, and maybe in that small county the women were all willing adult participants.  But are we really comfortable believing that none of those girls the boys bought for a drunken night out were fifteen year olds who had no other place to be and no other way to earn a living?  Unionized 'sex workers' they likely were not.  Poor, uneducated and exploited, they probably were.  If they then became infected, and untreated, died a painful death from syphillis, would we then start to see that whoring could be evil? 

Even before we get to the obvious (I hope) evil of today's child sex slaves all over the world. 

 

Arranging marriages between young people based only on a horse race?  Well, maybe that only seems evil if you're one of the girls who ends up under some stranger who has never known tenderness in his life.  And apparently in this case, all's well that ends well, because the implication is that (magically?) all of these damaged and unprepared young people lived happily ever after.  (But don't you have to wonder, NONE of them was a secretive wife-beater?)

 

I think it's a good thing that Bruce is considering a sequel.  Besides providing us with, no  doubt, another engrossing book, in his revelations about the future of these characters, we might find that some apparently minor part of their current story was the 'evil' seed that causes great problems ahead.  We don't always recognize what's going to be the greatest evil when we first see it. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

[ Edited ]

BookWoman -- thank you for your thoughtful comments.  Several comments come to mind, but I'll mention only three here until after we have all wrestled with our discussion on the final section of TWoF.  First, "sin" is as troublesome a word to me as "evil."  Second, my questions come more from large business management and diversity training, psychology, and parenting than from religion.  Third, when are cruelty and evilness different?

 

Pepper  

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Frequent Contributor
Madgy
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)


pen21 wrote:

 


CAG wrote:

I just wanted to make a comment about several readers finding the "vivid descriptions" in this story as somewhat overwhelming. I do respect that opinion but for me those "vivid descriptions" are what made the book seem so real to me both in the first and second sections. I like my books to feel real, the characters, the settings etc. The descriptions are what made me see Bruce Machart as a talented writer. I am interested in what anyone else has to say and how the descriptions add or take away from this story as far as others are concerned. The differing opinions are what makes these discussions so interesting to me.


 

The vivid imagery in all the scenes of the book show such wonderful writing skills. And it makes the book come alive for me. I like when a fiction book can bring a scene to life for me, to make it real. Life can be crude, horrible, sweet, wonderful, etc. But bringing each type of life to a state that makes me think it is real, is such a great feeling.

Luanne


I absolutely love the " vivid descriptions"!!  When I read a book I want to really feel like I'm there watching everything take place!!   That to me is a great read and I am absolutely enjoying this book!! 

Madgy

Frequent Contributor
Madgy
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)


Bonnie_C wrote:

Vaclav's reaction to the ruining of Klara's picture was as if she died all over again.  The fact that the man held on to this picture and grieved over it's loss tells me that he truly loved Klara,and it was not just a marriage of convenience.  In the absence of Klara, he cherishes her belongings.

 

I still don't think we have the complete picture of what made Vaclav turn from a stern but caring man into someone who put his sons into a plow yoke.  Maybe in the 3rd part of the book.

 

Bonnie


Yes it's very clear to me too that Vaclav loved his wife and it will be very interesting to see what made him do that to his boys because I don't think it's because they ruined the picture.

Madgy

Frequent Contributor
Madgy
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)


coffee_luvr wrote:

 


coffee_luvr wrote:

 


Rachel-K wrote:

We open with our only childhood scene so far after the first pages of the novel. Does Vaclav become more "human" for us, if not more humane, toward his boys? We get, for example, an image of Vaclav making breakfast for the young boys and watching them eat, warning them to be careful with their mother's dishes. How does such a scene fit with the man who would put yokes on his sons for plowing? 

Yes, I did feel that the Vaclav's character took on more humane characteristics at this point.  I couldn't help but feel that he probably was reminded of his loss every time he looked at Karel and the things she used to touch became so important to him.  That was a rare look inside this character. 

I don't know how to reconcile this with the fact that he used his boys to pull a plow rather than his horses.  That is just really, really tough! 

 

Why does Karel turn his truck around after watching a boy and his father hunt along the roadside?

I thought he turned around to watch this because it represented what he wished he had both with his father and now just maybe, he could have it as a father to his own son.  An opportunity to possibly change the cycle. 

 


 

I was reading these questions again and realized I kindof missed the point of the above question about Karel turning his truck around........I was thinking along the lines of why did he stop and pull over and watch the father and son, but really the question was why does he go back to town after watching the hunting episode with the father and son? 

So, as others have posted, I too think Karel went back to be with his wife and family because he realized he had an opportunity to be a father to his own son and that he needed to start off that relationship right by being there with his new baby boy and his wife and daughters.


Exactly! And my favorite part is that he Held his son in his arms!!!  How great was that!

Madgy

Inspired Contributor
nymazz
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎09-14-2009

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

[ Edited ]

 

 

 

We open with our only childhood scene so far after the first pages of the novel. Does Vaclav become more "human" for us, if not more humane, toward his boys? We get, for example, an image of Vaclav making breakfast for the young boys and watching them eat, warning them to be careful with their mother's dishes. How does such a scene fit with the man who would put yokes on his sons for plowing? 

Reading the first chapters I thought I'd never say this but I would have to say, yes Vaclav did seem a bit more human and I actually felt sorry for him (only in regard to the death of his wife). The way he cherished the few possessions of his wife's that he had left, Warning the boys to be careful.  I was also surprised that his reaction to the ruined picture was not as severe as I was expecting.  But that being said that still does not change or explain how he mistreated his sons.

 

Why does Karel turn his truck around after watching a boy and his father hunt along the roadside?

His wife just gave birth to their first son  but I think witnessing this caring relationship between the father and his son made him reflect on how he wished his life had been with his father and hopefully he is thinking that that is how he will be with his son and make sure he does not continue the neglect and abuse his father showed him and his brothers.

 

What does Sophie's teasing of him tell us about their relationship?

I would like to believe that the teasing is showing us there is more to this relationship than what we are seeing through Karels actions, especially before and during the birth of his son.

 

Why did Karel hire the twins, Joe and Raymond? Why did he feel some affinity for the boys? How do you compare their characters with Karel's now that we've seen them in action? 

 I would like to believe he wanted to be with his family at this time and realized for once that they should come first.

 

 

 

 


 

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are. -Mason Cooley-
Scribe
ReadingPatti
Posts: 2,523
Registered: ‎10-24-2008

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

nymazz, No way does Valcav ever become human for me. He may have had some feels for his wife but that all ended. He is a man of contradictions. He may watch his sons eat but to use them as plow horses is beyond belief.

 

Karel stopped to watch the interaction between father and son. He knew that one day he would do that with his son. He saw how the boy beamed when he shot the bird. How the father taught him and praised him for what he did.

 

That she like the keep him on his toes. She may know that he covets her sister and goes with other women. It may also be just her way of telling Karel how much she loves him.

 

I think he saw something in Joe and Raymond that reminded him so himself and his brothers. They were out on their own. I think he wanted to help them someway. They can't seem to see what a good thing they have been given. They want to get what they think they deserve.

 

A lot. To fight over a horse race was ridculous. To beat each other up was stupid. It served not purpose but the get out their anger. The boys all act as they do because of Vaclav. What more can we expect. I certain hope they don't to the same to their own children. But once a cycle starts it is hard to break.

 

I think if anyone can it is Karel. I think he loves he wife and children. That he tries in is own way to show that. He has faults and his actions can all lead back to his father.

 

 

 

This is an interesting book. The cruelty and stupidity are beyond belief. All because of one man, Vaclav. Perhaps he knew nothing but cruelty himself. We may never knew what drove him to do what he did to his sons. To love land and horses more that your children is beyond my understanding.

 

I am glad that Bruce wrote this book. For us to open our eye to what people do to children. To abuse those who can't fight for themselve is something we all need to watch for. These children do not deserve this. They have done nothing but been born. Parents need to cherish to children that God gives them not abuse them.

 

I just wish that the story did not jump from on time to another. I think in my opinion it interrupts the flow. I would like it much better is it went straight through instead of jumping back and forth.

 

ReadingPatti

Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)


BookWoman718 wrote:

Pepper and Fozzie,

 

Another interesting discussion you've raised, Pepper!   Is it the action or the perpetrator that is 'evil' ?   Your take on it seems to follow the Church adage, Love the sinner, but hate the sin, which is I think easier for a religious or god-like entity to adhere to than it is for us spouses, family members, neighbors, and business associates who must serve as formal or informal prosecutors, defenders, judges, and juries sometimes.

 


I don't think people are born evil.  Most people are good people.  But, come on, how many of us know someone who wagered the lives of their children on a horse race, hitched children to a plow, or burned down a barn filled with animals?  These actions do not come from "regular" people.  These were not actions done quickly and without thought.  These actions were premeditated and deliberate, and came from evil people.  A person doesn't have to remain evil, but I would be hard pressed to call a few of the men in the novel "good" in any way.

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

Why does Karel turn his truck around after watching a boy and his father hunt along the roadside?

 

Side question to the above.  Karel comments that the father is teaching the boy incorrectly (so sound will carry to the birds).

 

Who taught Karel?

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wake of Forgiveness: Middle Chapters to "Testaments to Seed," (p.212)

 


fordmg wrote (excerpt):
 

I see that putting the boys to a plow harness is directly related to ruining the picture of Karel's mother, Vaclav's wife. 

 

 


Where is it clear in the text that the ruined picture led to harnessing the boys to the plow?  I missed those lines and have not found them.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy