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dhaupt
Posts: 11,839
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: We have one =)

 

DSaff wrote:

I never thought I would say this, but we have a Nook! It is a combined Mother's/Father's Day gift and is charging right now. As Mike and I have been reading all of your comments, we realized that we wanted the total experience. Lo and behold, we now can! (very thankful for those who made it possible) We still love our physical books and will continue to want that experience most of the time. This is simply an addition to our collection. Now, how are we going to share it during this book discussion! <grin>

 

 

Ok that does it, a nook is definitely now on my wish list.

I'm green Donna, but Way To Go

Let us know how you like it.

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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: We have one =)

I think we are going to like the Nook, Debbie. I am still trying to figure some things out (like putting my own pictures and music on it) but Mike read a chapter in a book last night and said it worked fine. I think I will really appreciate it on windy days when I want to read outside!  :smileywink:

 

dhaupt wrote:

 

DSaff wrote:

I never thought I would say this, but we have a Nook! It is a combined Mother's/Father's Day gift and is charging right now. As Mike and I have been reading all of your comments, we realized that we wanted the total experience. Lo and behold, we now can! (very thankful for those who made it possible) We still love our physical books and will continue to want that experience most of the time. This is simply an addition to our collection. Now, how are we going to share it during this book discussion! <grin>

 

 

Ok that does it, a nook is definitely now on my wish list.

I'm green Donna, but Way To Go

Let us know how you like it.

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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NikiGunn
Posts: 158
Registered: ‎01-28-2010
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Re: We have one =)

DSaff wrote:

I think we are going to like the Nook, Debbie. I am still trying to figure some things out (like putting my own pictures and music on it) but Mike read a chapter in a book last night and said it worked fine. I think I will really appreciate it on windy days when I want to read outside!  :smileywink:

Once you understand the folder structure on the Nook, it is really easy. You should crop your pictures first (600 x 800 for screensavers, 600 x 760 for wallpapers) to make the best use of the e-ink screen and they do tend to look better if you change them to black and white first. I changed my pictures using the Paint program that comes with Windows, so you can do it without expensive, fancy programs. If you want more details, head over to the e-book boards. You'll find out more about the Nook than you wanted to know.

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maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: We have one =)

Congratulations, Dstaff, on your new Nook. You two will be fighting over it. I love mine and my husband borrows my Kindle to read stuff he wants to read.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: We have one =)

thank you  =)

NikiGunn wrote:

DSaff wrote:

I think we are going to like the Nook, Debbie. I am still trying to figure some things out (like putting my own pictures and music on it) but Mike read a chapter in a book last night and said it worked fine. I think I will really appreciate it on windy days when I want to read outside!  :smileywink:

Once you understand the folder structure on the Nook, it is really easy. You should crop your pictures first (600 x 800 for screensavers, 600 x 760 for wallpapers) to make the best use of the e-ink screen and they do tend to look better if you change them to black and white first. I changed my pictures using the Paint program that comes with Windows, so you can do it without expensive, fancy programs. If you want more details, head over to the e-book boards. You'll find out more about the Nook than you wanted to know.

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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Deanne75
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
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Re: We have one =)

Congrats on the new Nook!

 

I LOVE the "Free Fridays" downloads and just started

 

The Incumbent 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was a free pick from a couple of weeks ago.

 

One of the things I love most about the Nook is that it has really helped me out of a reading rut.  It is so easy to use.  Finding and downloading all kinds of content is a breeze.  Before, I would go to the library and pull books from the same section, by the same authors, and was more hesitant to try something new.  I still love all of my old favorite authors, series, and titles, but I'm having a lot of fun reading new things too.

Deanne
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dclement04
Posts: 99
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Re: Community Room

 I'm currently reading Jeffrey Zaslow's "The Girls from Ames". Its really good so far.

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Thayer wrote:

Wow!  Everyone is REALLY making me want a nook now! Am pinching pennies as we speak...just wish we could at least use our B & N membership discount.

 

 

Hi Thayer,
I'm with you.  I'm getting very jealous.  This week's email from B&N said free gift wrapping with the purchase of a Nook.  My daughter sent me an email and said wouldn't it be nice if it said "purchase gift wrapping and receive a free Nook".  Yeah, in my dreams, but wouldn't that be nice.
Literature

 

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: New York by Edward Rutherfurd (from Welcomes and Introductions)

 

Hi krb2g,

 

I bought "New York" when it first came out but still haven't read it, just can't find the time.  Being born and raised in NYC, I love reading about its history and still do the historical walks run by the doctorate students of American history at Columbia. 

 

Another good book for your discussion group is Under This Unbroken Sky by Shandi Mitchell.  I don't remember if you were a participant when we did it in the FL, but it's a great book and a lot to discuss.

 

Another favorite of mine is Someone Knows My Name, I don't remember the author's name.  I actually listened to the audio and the narrator was amazing.

 

Literature

krb2g wrote:

I'm responding to a post from the Welcomes and Introductions thread here:

 

nymazz wrote:

Sherry,

I just purchased New York by Edward Rutherfurd, how was it?

Any info is appreciated.

 

 

Sherry_Young wrote:

Greeting fellow book lovers!

 

The Writing Circle will be my 4th First Look selection to read/discuss. I began last fall with The Postmistress and enjoyed the experience immensely. When the next First Look selection was announced, I told a couple of friends about it. The result was not only that they participated in the next First Look, but also in the creation of our own local book club. Thank you B&N First Look!

 

We have discussed:

Eat, Pray, Love - Elizabeth Gilbert

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society -Mary Ann Shaffer/Annie Barrows

New York - Edward Rutherfurd

The Help - Kathryn Stockett

Eternal on the Water - Joseph Monninger - yet to discuss with group

 

Would love to hear what you think on these or any reading recommendations for our group!

 

Can't wait to discuss The Writing Circle with all of you!

 

 

 

I really liked

New York: I thought it was generally well-done. Rutherfurd's style is very similar to that of James Michener. I am not familiar with the city personally, though, so knowing the places might make someone like it more or less. Here's my review from when I read it: This book presents a long view of the history of New York by telling parts of the stories of several fictional families. I learned a lot about the city and a lot about various parts of history. I thought the book was especially good on the colonial period, the Revolutionary War, and the Civil War draft riots. While the city remains the main character, I thought the book spent too much time on upper class characters generally--they tended to be better developed and to occupy a greater part of narrative time. All in all, a book well worth the read.

 

 

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Sherry_Young
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎09-02-2009
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Re: Community Room

Our book club just read The Help and absolutely loved it!

 

I hope you do, too...

 

Thayer wrote:

Oh yeah, forgot to mention that I am currently reading  

The Help 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul,

 

Can you tell us when we may expect our downloads to be sent?   Thanks again, this one looks great.

 

 

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.
— Judy Blume
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Sherry_Young
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎09-02-2009
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Re: Community Room

I read Sarah's Key a couple of weeks ago and I loved how she shared the story in both present and past.
The Girl Who Chased the Moon was good, but a little strange.
Everyone in our book club loved The Help. Historical fiction is my favorite genre. I think that is why I liked Sarah's Key and The Help more.
Happy reading!
Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.
— Judy Blume
Inspired Contributor
Sherry_Young
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎09-02-2009

Re: Community Room

When you consider that the First Look Club is a marketing tool for both the publisher and B&N, it is easy to understand why they have chosen to preview the book in this manner. I would imagine they are as interested in hearing feedback not only on the book itself, but also on how people like/dislike reading e-books.

 

I'm grateful to be able to read these books in advance (for free) and to be able to participate in such discussions...I can't complain.

 

 

Lil_Irish_Lass wrote:

I'm very disappointed that this is an e-book only. After so many great ARC selections I had hoped that Barnes and Noble would continue, but it looks like they might be moving in a new direction. It's a shame. I can't get in to reading books on my computer nor do I have any interest in an electronic reader. I like my books the way they've been produced for centuries. Guess this will give me an opportunity to not get distracted from my growing TBR list.

 

I just can't help but feel that it is unfair to those of us who have been faithful participants of the FL process for years. But maybe that's just me, it seems everyone else is excited.

 

 

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.
— Judy Blume
Nallia
Posts: 4,758
Topics: 125
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Registered: ‎02-15-2010
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Re: Community Room

I finished Outlander on Wedneday night, Read this yesterday:

Burned (House of Night Series #7)

 

 

and started this one this afternoon:

 

 

Oath of Fealty

  

 

 

I'm also reading Iliad, by Dan Simmons, and will be starting The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms when I'm done with Oath of Fealty.

 

 

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

  

 

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Sherry_Young
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎09-02-2009
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Re: Community Room

 

blue2280 wrote:

 

Sherry_Young wrote:

 

 

I loved both Guernsey and Sarah's Key! I'm a sucker for WWII era fiction, though. Did you read The Postmistress by Sarah Black with First Look?

 

I have been wanting to read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. What did you think of it?

 

I too love WWII era anything...fiction or nonfiction. The Postmistress was actually my first, First Look read and I liked that one as well! There are a couple of books that I have on my reading list, The Welsh Girl and The Skeletons at the Feast, that are that era too. Have you read any of those?

 

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo was good, very very slow to start though. It took me a couple of times to really get into it. I would pick it up and put it back down, but once I finally got past the beginning, it picked up the pace and got a lot better. I will continue to read that trilogy :smileyhappy:

 

 

Just realized I had spell check wrong and wrote Sarah Black instead of Blake...oops!

 

The Postmistress was also my first First Look book. I have not read the others that you mentioned, but I will be sure to look them up and add to my wish list. I think my love of this era stems from reading The Diary of Anne Frank when I was younger. Between that and our travels to Normandy/London, I am hooked on that era!

 

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.
— Judy Blume
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Sherry_Young
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎09-02-2009
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Re: New York by Edward Rutherfurd (from Welcomes and Introductions)

Literature,

 

Since you have lived in NYC, I think you will definitely appreciate the novel. I do recommend you find some time to read it when you can sit for a long time to read it and not just trying to read a chapter here or there.

 

Our book club had this selected (why, because we were insane?!?) and several didn't finish it. Many had difficulty getting through the early Dutch period. I found that the beginning did move slow for me as well, but I was determined to finish the book. I found that some sections are slower to read because you are starting to get to know new characters or don't care for a character. There might be eras in NY's history that you find more intrigueing than others. It does span a time period of hundred of years taking you up through last decade.

 

I hope you find time and enjoy it. After I had finished and absorbed it all, I found that I was truly glad I had read it!

 

Sherry

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.
— Judy Blume
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: Community Room

Nallia,

I really liked the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms. We discussed this book on the scifi/fantasy board. I put the link below to the thread. Be sure to add your thoughts to the thread. We plan on discussing the next book when it comes out. Looking forward for your thoughts.

pen21

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Fantasy-Science-Fiction/MARCH-FEATURE-1-The-Hundred-Thousand-...

 

 

Nallia wrote:

 

 

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Sapphire329
Posts: 144
Registered: ‎05-09-2009
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Re: Community Room

I just finished Dead in the Family by Charlaine Harris on Wednesday and I started Spooky Little Girls by Laurie Notaro last night

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krb2g
Posts: 289
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
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Re: Community Room

 

Sapphire329 wrote:

I just finished Dead in the Family by Charlaine Harris on Wednesday and I started Spooky Little Girls by Laurie Notaro last night

 

I just finished Dead in the Family last night. I enjoyed it, although I felt like a lot of the action was happening off-stage (so to speak), and that it was opening up questions that weren't resolved (but will probably be dealt with later...). I found myself remembering the previous books better than I thought I would. There's a discussion of the book on the paranormal boards this month.

 

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Sherry_Young
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Re: We have one =)

I must admit that I just bought a Nook tonight! I didn't get it just b/c of the next FL, but these posts have convinced me that I will enjoy it!

 

How do you like yours, Donna, now that it's charged and ready?

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won't have as much censorship because we won't have as much fear.
— Judy Blume
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Buttertron
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Re: We have one =)

[ Edited ]

*This is supposed to be a response to a post from Deanne75, but I haven't figured out how to quote people yet. So sorry!*

 

 

I think that is one big reason I want a Nook so badly! I do the same thing at the library. I'm drawn to the same authors and the same few genres like I'm on auto-pilot. When people ask me what kind of books I prefer, I say that I'll read anything (which is true!), but I usually stick to what I know already and I'd like to get out of that habit.

 

By the way - hello, everyone! I'm new to First Look and book clubs in general. I'm looking forward to being a part of it! Right now, I'm reading Once Upon a Marigold. It's a super easy read since it's recommended for 9-12 year olds, but I wanted something simple after the last book I read! :]

 

 

Once Upon a Marigold

  

 

You don't have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them. - Ray Bradbury