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Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Paul and That Scene

Thank you so much!

 

The book book should be in stores July 6th.

 

--Corinne

 


maxcat wrote:

Thank you, Corrine for that beautiful insight. I would love to see the finished book in hardback come July 6th. Somehow, your book lost its flavor presented as an ebook and you are correct in saying we should have the option of reading the physical book or the ebook. May your book do well in sales and I'll be looking for it as I want to see what you are talking about. The prefave was in a different font but everything else was in the normal font.


 

 

Correspondent
retromom
Posts: 113
Registered: ‎02-02-2008

Re: Paul and That Scene

I really liked Paul. I felt sorry for him. Nobody was really watching out for Paul except maybe Rachel somewhat. At least she reached out to him. Paul was a pawn in his parent's divorce and he knew that sadly. He didn't fit in at home nor at school. I could imagine his pain in the scene where he goes back to his former home. I kept hoping good things would happen to Paul but only the worst thing imaginable happens to him.

Beth

http://bookaholicmom.blogspot.com/
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pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Paul and That Scene

 


retromom wrote:

I really liked Paul. I felt sorry for him. Nobody was really watching out for Paul except maybe Rachel somewhat. At least she reached out to him. Paul was a pawn in his parent's divorce and he knew that sadly. He didn't fit in at home nor at school. I could imagine his pain in the scene where he goes back to his former home. I kept hoping good things would happen to Paul but only the worst thing imaginable happens to him.


 

I like what you say about Paul. After finishing the book, I felt that the author wanted us Curious about Paul - why he had his own chapters, Gillian and his father's relationship to him, lack of friends, Rachel knowing him for school, then the tragic end. Paul is weaved throughout the book. That is why I think it was such a shock at the end. pen21

 

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pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Paul and That Scene

I hadn't related the mouse scene and Paul's death. I think you picked a good correlation here. That mouse scene for Gillian shut her down emotionally, which just seemed over dramatic on Gillian's part for me. But it can explain to me her reactions to hitting Paul and then leaving to hide at Buttons. Thank you, it was like a light bulb came on in my head. Yes the book never says if Paul died, I hope he didn't , but the book leads me to believe he did.

pen21

 

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

I am convinced that Paul is dead. I justify this by tying it to the scene of the dead mouse at Buttons (the house that Gillian rents - I can't quite remember if this is the correct name for it and am in a hurry, .... almost out the door....) The scene wasn't really necessary unless it had to tell us something important about Gillian: namely that she is horrified to look at dead animals. Gillian flees the scene in the driveway instinctively, because the hit must have been hard enough to let her imagine that she killed something.

 

And symbolically speaking (I apologize to those who don't want to see symbols in everything and to the author who might not have felt symbolism was necessary here), anyway, symbolically speaking, a minor death (mouse) for me was a warning signal that not all is well in Gillian's world. Why else would a prominent poet fall apart at the sight of a dead mouse? The punishment for stealing material from Nancy had to be an event that would expose her inner decay, make her run from confronting the truth about her own carefully constructed self-image. The house where she wrote poetry was a house of cards, her marriage and even her pretend mothering of Paul are built on shaky ground. Death weakened Gillian. Now death will destroy Gillian.

 

The real answer, of course, is that NO, "the book never quite definitively states that Paul dies."

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

The book never quite definitively states that Paul dies, does it? I think it infers it when Gillian ruminates about what she might have hit on the road and then after discovering whom she hit, when she coldly surmises that her life with Jerry is probably over. After all, not only did she run Paul down, she left the scene and never looked back. Jerry could never forgive her for that.

She pretended she hit a deer knowing that it was not really true. At worst, I felt that she thought since whatever happened had no witness, it wouldn't effect her. Maybe there will be a second book in the series and Paul will turn out only to have been gravely injured! He certainly didn't deserve to die. Anyway, that is the ending I would like to imagine since I kind of liked Paul and hoped he would develop into a fine young man in spite of his father's remote behavior and selfishness.


 

 

 


 

 

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Paul and That Scene

Hi pen 21,

I agree with you...it all makes sense now.  How the mouse scene and Gillian's reaction to hitting some one or some thing all ties in together.  Sometimes the obvious is the hardest to see.

 

Thank you, SunItCloud, for pointing it out so clearly.  Symbolism is necessary in order to truly understand the characters and where they are coming from.

 

TWJ, I hoped also that Paul was not fatally struck, a serious injury that he makes a full recovery from would be a good prognosis.

Literature

 

 


pen21 wrote:

I hadn't related the mouse scene and Paul's death. I think you picked a good correlation here. That mouse scene for Gillian shut her down emotionally, which just seemed over dramatic on Gillian's part for me. But it can explain to me her reactions to hitting Paul and then leaving to hide at Buttons. Thank you, it was like a light bulb came on in my head. Yes the book never says if Paul died, I hope he didn't , but the book leads me to believe he did.

pen21

 

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

I am convinced that Paul is dead. I justify this by tying it to the scene of the dead mouse at Buttons (the house that Gillian rents - I can't quite remember if this is the correct name for it and am in a hurry, .... almost out the door....) The scene wasn't really necessary unless it had to tell us something important about Gillian: namely that she is horrified to look at dead animals. Gillian flees the scene in the driveway instinctively, because the hit must have been hard enough to let her imagine that she killed something.

 

And symbolically speaking (I apologize to those who don't want to see symbols in everything and to the author who might not have felt symbolism was necessary here), anyway, symbolically speaking, a minor death (mouse) for me was a warning signal that not all is well in Gillian's world. Why else would a prominent poet fall apart at the sight of a dead mouse? The punishment for stealing material from Nancy had to be an event that would expose her inner decay, make her run from confronting the truth about her own carefully constructed self-image. The house where she wrote poetry was a house of cards, her marriage and even her pretend mothering of Paul are built on shaky ground. Death weakened Gillian. Now death will destroy Gillian.

 

The real answer, of course, is that NO, "the book never quite definitively states that Paul dies."

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

The book never quite definitively states that Paul dies, does it? I think it infers it when Gillian ruminates about what she might have hit on the road and then after discovering whom she hit, when she coldly surmises that her life with Jerry is probably over. After all, not only did she run Paul down, she left the scene and never looked back. Jerry could never forgive her for that.

She pretended she hit a deer knowing that it was not really true. At worst, I felt that she thought since whatever happened had no witness, it wouldn't effect her. Maybe there will be a second book in the series and Paul will turn out only to have been gravely injured! He certainly didn't deserve to die. Anyway, that is the ending I would like to imagine since I kind of liked Paul and hoped he would develop into a fine young man in spite of his father's remote behavior and selfishness.


 

 

 


 

 


 

Contributor
WhyDoUPickOnMe
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎01-17-2010
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Re: Paul and That Scene

Throughout the book I had wondered what role Paul was going to play in the end.  I was shocked when I found out he was hit by Gillian.  I had completely forgotten about the beginning.

 

Unlike some readers, I had just assumed that he was killed by Gillian.  She seemed so cold-hearted and mean throughout the book that in my mind, she did kill him when she hit him.

Inspired Correspondent
Goodword
Posts: 111
Registered: ‎01-04-2010

Re: Paul and That Scene

I thought the conclusion of the novel was stunning and effective.  The opening and closing scenes brought the novel full circle which I find, from a structural perspective, to be satisfying.  I think I wish the opening chapter to Nancy's novel would have been placed later to avoid confusion.  There were some parallels between the scenes that confused me, because I didn't feel that the two were related, but positionally and the parallels made them seem to be so. 

 

The mystery of the scene--well, I suppose there is some ambiguity as to whether Paul did die and whether Gillian was aware of what she had done and was in denial, or didn't care.  There are ambiguities about Gillian's character throughout the novel.  Did she know she was plagarizing, or did she truly believe it was acceptable that she was taking something and making it better, making it her own?

 

How well did we get to know Paul?  Enough to care about him and to hope for a good outcome for him. 

Frequent Contributor
momofprecious1
Posts: 67
Registered: ‎01-06-2010

Re: Paul and That Scene

Wow, this was not the way I was expecting the book to end. I was really upset that Paul died & mad @ Gillian for not stopping to see what she hit. I thought she had hit Kim & was completely surprised when I found out that it was Paul. She deserved to pay for what she did but I didn't expect her to pay this way. I knew the ending would have something to do with the beginning of the book the minute Paul mentioned that Gillian went out but I was expecting to find out about the couple who lost the baby.

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LKD_726
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎07-16-2009
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Re: Paul and That Scene

I thought that Paul had a lot of potential because he was such a compassionate, sensitive young man.  It was heartbreaking that his parents used him as a pawn in their messed up relationship.  I think Gillian wanted to have a better relationship with Paul but she just was not capable of that.  I loved the ending and had actually forgot about the beginning of the book.  At first, I thought that this was going to relate somehow to Nancy's story.  The book doesn't specifically say that Paul dies so I hopeful that he doesn't. 

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Naper_Mom
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎05-05-2010
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Re: Paul and That Scene

I actually forgot about that opening scene until I reached the end of the book (I only remembered the scene with Nancy's father).

 

I may have been looking for connections between the characters where none existed...but did anyone else think that the childhood home that Paul goes to visit (right after he meets with Rachel about the accusation of plagiarism) was Nancy's house?  I think the description of the house with the 'tacked on glass room' in the back was what lead me to this conclusion...but then it was never confirmed in the later parts of the book.

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Paul and That Scene

Hi--

So glad you loved the ending!  I know it's generated a lot of discussion!

 

--Corinne


LKD_726 wrote:

I thought that Paul had a lot of potential because he was such a compassionate, sensitive young man.  It was heartbreaking that his parents used him as a pawn in their messed up relationship.  I think Gillian wanted to have a better relationship with Paul but she just was not capable of that.  I loved the ending and had actually forgot about the beginning of the book.  At first, I thought that this was going to relate somehow to Nancy's story.  The book doesn't specifically say that Paul dies so I hopeful that he doesn't. 


 

 

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Paul and That Scene

Dear Goodword--

 

Thank you so much for your praise of the ending and your wise contributions to our discussion.

Quick question for you--

are you sure that opening scene with the doctor is from Nancy's novel and not Gillian's?

--Corinne

 

 

Goodword wrote:

I thought the conclusion of the novel was stunning and effectiveThe opening and closing scenes brought the novel full circle which I find, from a structural perspective, to be satisfyingI think I wish the opening chapter to Nancy's novel would have been placed later to avoid confusionThere were some parallels between the scenes that confused me, because I didn't feel that the two were related, but positionally and the parallels made them seem to be so

 

The mystery of the scene--well, I suppose there is some ambiguity as to whether Paul did die and whether Gillian was aware of what she had done and was in denial, or didn't careThere are ambiguities about Gillian's character throughout the novelDid she know she was plagarizing, or did she truly believe it was acceptable that she was taking something and making it better, making it her own?

 

How well did we get to know PaulEnough to care about him and to hope for a good outcome for him


 

 

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Paul and That Scene

Thank you all for picking up on the importance of the mouse scene.

It's also there to show Gillian at a weak moment.

 

--Corinne

Inspired Correspondent
Goodword
Posts: 111
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: Paul and That Scene

"are you sure that opening scene with the doctor is from Nancy's novel and not Gillian's?"

 

Good question!  Since the opening chapters of each were almost identical, I suppose it could be either!  I think I linked it with Nancy at first because I "met" Nancy first, but then because of the doctor's response to the baby's death--"...he could not go on this way.  He had allowed grief to enter into a realm where grief had no place, and the result was that he could no longer function as he needed to."  Also, the promise that the parents of the child would later be content parents of two sons didn't strike me that the point of the book to follow would be a lawsuit.  And, the writing style seemed overly descriptive; for some reason, I thought that could be Nancy--but the poetic description could be Gillian's as well.

 

Gillian could have written it.  When she describes the doctor as having been a shy kid who had gone away to boarding school, and when she describes his posture, she could have taken her inspiration from Paul. 

 

Either way--fun to think about!

Correspondent
JoanieGranola
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎11-11-2009
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Re: Paul and That Scene

How do you feel with the scene we witnessed at the opening of the novel  also becoming part of the novel's conclusion? I did not really like it. Because the novel itself was all over the place, I didn't feel there was any real connection to the blurb at the beginning to the end of the story.

 

How does the mystery of this scene fit in with the rest of the novel? The mystery of this scene doesn't really fit in at all with the rest of the novel. If the rest of the novel was supposed to be about loyalty and relationships, this bit just sort of appeared out of nowhere and didn't really have a place in the entirety of the story.

 

How does the scene change if you read it once as a fictional scene, written by one of the novel's characters, and then finally as a "real" scene about characters we know? I didn't see any change. I wasn't sure why it was there to begin with, then halfway through the book I thought maybe it was part of a novel. But to find that it was actually part of this novel as an actual scene was just bizarre.

 

 

How would you describe Paul's character? How well did we get to know him? Paul was a self-conscious boy who had few friends and knew he was being used by his parents. He had a very hard time at school but found solace with his mentor Rachel. I think we got to know him well enough, as he was one of the characters described often, but if the only reason to have him in the story was to showcase Gillian as a cold, heartless, self-centered woman in the end, he wasn't really all that necessary to the plot.

 

I found the entire scene to be a little surreal. I know we were given a reason for Kim to show up on Gillian's doorstep, but why now? And I understand why Paul would run after Kim to prevent her from getting hit by Gillian, but wasn't there another way for him to contact her without getting hit himself? And why didn't Gillian at least phone her husband once she got to The Button? I understand that it was all explained, but it didn't seem a good enough explanation. She freaks out over a dead mouse in her garbage can but doesn't call her husband when she hits something that she thinks might be a deer? And it turns out to be her stepson? And Gillian's thought process at the conclusion of this novel is truly manic - she clearly sees that she has done no wrong to Nancy, to the group, to Adam/Kim, to her husband or stepson. What is wrong with this woman? She was characterized as being selfish and thinking she was better than everyone else, but this last peek into her as a person truly makes her a monster. And to end the novel on this note rather than give closure to some of the other subplots (including what I believe to be the main plot, which is the plagiarism) in the book disappoints me.

 

I was outraged that the author didn't take the time to allow everyone -- from Paul, to Gillian's husband, to those in her group -- to realize what a fraud she was in her theft of others' work. She gives Paul a speech about being dishonorable by stealing other peoples's work and she's done it TWICE herself. I think it would've been better to give Paul's character the satisfaction of knowing what a fraud she was before he died (if in fact he did die. We only know that she ran over him with her car and Kim called the police).