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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Maxcat...I read the preface a few times myself ,,just to make sure I didn't miss anything...Monday we will know all..Glad there is a mystery attached to TWC...Susan

maxcat wrote:

Thank you, Corrine for your response and yes, I do find it difficult to read this book electronically. I have had to make numerous notes about the characters as it's hard to go through a nook even if you use bookmarks. I found myself re-reading the preface as a lot of different comments were made concerning that section. I feel that if this book was in a bookstore, I probably would pick it up to read rather than download it.

 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

 

Corinne-Demas wrote:

Good morning to you!

I'm impressed that you're taking on this novel on your Blackberry.

My hope with Gillian is that readers will be intrigued by the character, even if she isn't the kind of woman they would like if she were a real person.

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning.Corinne,.I am reading The Writing Circle on my Blackberry  A first time experience.Being so used to hard copies,its been an experiment for me.I think if I had a nook,it might be a bit easier..But even though I am so used to holding a book,I can flip back and forth and bookmark and change font size..I am so looking forward to Monday..I am probably in the minority,but I do not dislike Gillian..Just understanding her..If because she is "out there"..and men are attracted to her,its not her fault entirely now is it? Susan Vtc...

 

 

 

Hi Corinne..Well it was My BlackberryCurve,from my Daughter,and I needed  a new phone as well or not read TWC  I tried my laptop,and it just wasn't for me,I couldn't concentrate as well....FirstLook is a Place I hardly miss out on,and has become a special place for all of us..I will have more time this weekend to finish TWC..and even though its a complex novel,,with so much going on,I have a feeling that we might not want it to end... Best Susan Vtc

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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eadieburke
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

[ Edited ]

 

Corinne-Demas wrote:

Good morning to you!

I'm impressed that you're taking on this novel on your Blackberry.

My hope with Gillian is that readers will be intrigued by the character, even if she isn't the kind of woman they would like if she were a real person.

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning.Corinne,.I am reading The Writing Circle on my Blackberry  A first time experience.Being so used to hard copies,its been an experiment for me.I think if I had a nook,it might be a bit easier..But even though I am so used to holding a book,I can flip back and forth and bookmark and change font size..I am so looking forward to Monday..I am probably in the minority,but I do not dislike Gillian..Just understanding her..If because she is "out there"..and men are attracted to her,its not her fault entirely now is it? Susan Vtc...

 

 

 

I read the whole book on my iphone and it wasn't bad at all - in fact, it was light and easy to handle!

 

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
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bdrdunc
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi Corrine,

Thank you for allowing us "Nook Readers" to read your novel before everyone else.  I have enjoyed the book thus far.  I know that a lot of people have been having a problem with your jumping around between characters.  The only problem I have is that it constantly keeps me wanting more.  I want to hurry up and get to through each character so I can find out what happens next to each of them.  Was this part of your thought process when your wrote TWC?  It keeps things more interesting, and we (or at least I) don't get bored with any of the characters.  I find that your novel is a very fast read.  Well written and the characters are very well described and written.  The reader begins to feel part of their lives.  Thank you!

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Vermontcozy
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

 

eadieburke wrote:

 

Corinne-Demas wrote:

Good morning to you!

I'm impressed that you're taking on this novel on your Blackberry.

My hope with Gillian is that readers will be intrigued by the character, even if she isn't the kind of woman they would like if she were a real person.

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning.Corinne,.I am reading The Writing Circle on my Blackberry  A first time experience.Being so used to hard copies,its been an experiment for me.I think if I had a nook,it might be a bit easier..But even though I am so used to holding a book,I can flip back and forth and bookmark and change font size..I am so looking forward to Monday..I am probably in the minority,but I do not dislike Gillian..Just understanding her..If because she is "out there"..and men are attracted to her,its not her fault entirely now is it? Susan Vtc...

 

 

 

I read the whole book on my iphone and it wasn't bad at all - in fact, it was light and easy to handle!

 

 

Hi eadie..I tried to post this a moment ago..but I lost it.Just posting to say,my blackberry was fine  and as you stated ,its light and very easy to handle  We miss you..Susan Vtc..Still reading

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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Corinne-Demas
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi Jacquie-

Thanks for responding to my question--

I'm glad to hear your nook is working out so well

I'm still most comfortable with paper-- but here I am workingdependent on my laptop and a few years ago I never imagined it would become an essential feature of my life!

--Corinne

 

rujama wrote:

 

Corinne-Demas wrote:

Hi Chris--

 

Several of you have commented on the number of charactersI wonder if it's harder to follow a novel like this if you're reading it electronically, rather than in a conventional book where it's easier to flip back through the pages and easier to mark paragraphs you might want to refer to.

Maybe this is something the group would like to addressAre their some kinds of books that are better suited to electronic reading than othersSimpler, more linear narratives perhaps?

 

It occurs to me that it might help readers to think of the form of this book as replicating the way we get to know people and figure out situations in real life. We get partial stories and have to piece things together to make sense of the wholeI hope by the end of the novel you'll see what I was trying to accomplish and the method will make more sense.

Thank you for sticking with it!

 

About Gillian-- perhaps you're not supposed to like her. . .

 

--Corinne

 

 

maxcat wrote:

Welcome, Corrine, glad you can join us as we criticize your work. I felt lost in the first 8 chapters. it's as if there were too many characters and lots of mini-plots. Did you mean to make these chapters somewhat disjointed or dysfunctional? Also, where did you get the idea about Gillian? No one seems to like her understandably in the book, but there are lots in this group that don't like her also. Thank you for your time, Chris.

 

 

 

 

I've been using my Nook to read the novel so I can not speak for the others that are reading on the computer, for me it has been easier to read this writing style on the Nook. I can bookmark pages that I question and then just hit "bookmarks" in the menu and I can see all the pages that I have marked. I can also hit "go to". I can also highlight and add notes to any of the pages. Looking up the words that I'm questioning is easier for me also because it's all in one area. I can also go to specific chapters and with the search function I can find what I am looking for quite easy. I've been using my nook for a while and it has become easy and natural for me to use it this way. I have so many bookmarks and notes that I refer to all the time and it gives me a better understanding of what I am reading. For me it is easier to find something with the Nook then having to flip through all my "dog ears" and markings on the paper page

 

Just my opinion

Jacquie

 

 

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Corinne-Demas
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

I do think think you're right-- I imagined that a lot of Gillian's seductiveness (bare feet) is more just the way she is-- rather than a deliberate, planned-out campaign.  (Inviting him to the Christmas party is a different matter!)

 

 

--Corinne

 

 

 

 

literature wrote:

Hi Corinne,

Unless Adam noticed her bare feet, it was completely lost on him, and since you never made mention of Adam noticing it, I guess Gillian had to go to plan D.  Plan D, Gillian told Adam to sit down at her desk and smell the wood.  He puts his head down on her desk.  She fondles his hair.  Plan C, go bare foot when you take him upstairs, walk through bedroom to show him office.  Plan B, wear ankle length, black velvet dress, it's cut low and so tight he could see my hip bones.   Plan A, invite Adam to Christmas party.  I just figured Gillian going bare foot was just Gillian being Gillian.

 

 

Corinne-Demas wrote:

Hi-- what interesting observations!

Gillian's bare feet are intended to be seductive (to Adam) -- how do you see them?

 

I hadn't been aware of the hair touching you pointed out.

Kim and Nancy's blondness is in contrast to Gillian's dark hair.  Keep that vision of Kim in mind as you get to the end of the story.

 

--Corinne

 

 

 

 

literature wrote:

Hi Corinne,

 

Welcome to our "readers" circle for The Writers Circle.  I'm almost finiished with this week's reading and have a few questions:

 

Gillian chapter, at her Christmas party:  Why did you make special mention that Gillian's "bare feet" made soft noises when she was showing Adam the upstairs in her house?  You then mentioned Adam's footsteps made noise.  (Sorry, the computer with the digital book is at home; otherwise, I would cite the page number.)  What purpose do the bare feet have, if any?  (Now I feel like a participant in The Writers Circle.)

 

In your descriptions of people, there were a number of call outs about people with blond hair.  I remember this in the first week's reading.  This week's reading was when you described Kim upon her arrival at Gillian's and then again when Chris was reading his revised section (the lawyer) at Nancy's house.

 

Another thing I noticed that is repeated is touching of hair, i.e. Gillian touched Adam's hair when he was sitting at her desk during the Christmas party; then when Chris and Nancy were leaving from lunch (last week's reading), Chris had touched Nancy's hair when Nancy told him about wearing the helmet when horseback riding.

 

Literature

 

 

 

 

 

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Corinne-Demas
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

And of course when you buy a book book you get a beautiful cover!

 

 

maxcat wrote:

Thank you, Corrine for your response and yes, I do find it difficult to read this book electronically. I have had to make numerous notes about the characters as it's hard to go through a nook even if you use bookmarks. I found myself re-reading the preface as a lot of different comments were made concerning that section. I feel that if this book was in a bookstore, I probably would pick it up to read rather than download it.

 

 

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Corinne-Demas
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

That's my hope! 

 

--Corinne

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

 

Corinne-Demas wrote:

Good morning to you!

I'm impressed that you're taking on this novel on your Blackberry.

My hope with Gillian is that readers will be intrigued by the character, even if she isn't the kind of woman they would like if she were a real person.

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

Good Morning.Corinne,.I am reading The Writing Circle on my Blackberry  A first time experience.Being so used to hard copies,its been an experiment for me.I think if I had a nook,it might be a bit easier..But even though I am so used to holding a book,I can flip back and forth and bookmark and change font size..I am so looking forward to Monday..I am probably in the minority,but I do not dislike Gillian..Just understanding her..If because she is "out there"..and men are attracted to her,its not her fault entirely now is it? Susan Vtc...

 

 

 

Hi Corinne..Well it was My BlackberryCurve,from my Daughter,and I needed  a new phone as well or not read TWC  I tried my laptop,and it just wasn't for me,I couldn't concentrate as well....FirstLook is a Place I hardly miss out on,and has become a special place for all of us..I will have more time this weekend to finish TWC..and even though its a complex novel,,with so much going on,I have a feeling that we might not want it to end... Best Susan Vtc

 

 

Author
Corinne-Demas
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Thank you so much! 

I was hoping you'd be wanting more from each character.  My concept is that the reader will think of all the  characters'  lives continuing even when they are off-stage.  I could have written a complete novel for each character's part of the story-- but my real interest was in having a story build  piece by piece, and having my reader assemble it and figure out all the connections.

Have fun!

 

--Corinne

 

bdrdunc wrote:

Hi Corrine,

Thank you for allowing us "Nook Readers" to read your novel before everyone else.  I have enjoyed the book thus far.  I know that a lot of people have been having a problem with your jumping around between characters.  The only problem I have is that it constantly keeps me wanting more.  I want to hurry up and get to through each character so I can find out what happens next to each of them.  Was this part of your thought process when your wrote TWC?  It keeps things more interesting, and we (or at least I) don't get bored with any of the characters.  I find that your novel is a very fast read.  Well written and the characters are very well described and written.  The reader begins to feel part of their lives.  Thank you!

 

 

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010

Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi Mike-

 

It's an honor for me to have my novel selected for this program. I'm enjoying the discussion enormously, and it's hard not to keep checking my computer all the time to see what you folks are saying.

 

I've belonged to several writing groups, and am familiar with several others, but my story isn't based on any actual group.  (My current writing group will vouch for the fact that it's not about them!) The discussion format that the Leopardi's use is one I've experienced.  Although this novel is about a group of writers, I think the dynamics are similar to those of many other kinds of groups. 

I began this novel with the characters and the situation, and the plot unfolded on its own. 

I've always been interested in ethical dilemmas and what happens when two characters who have somewhat different moral standards come into conflict.  

 

Thank you for being part of the discussion .I hope you enjoy the rest of the novel!

 

--Corinne

 

MSaff wrote:

Hi Corinne and welcome to our little corner of the world. 

 

  It is such an honor to be some of the first to read your novel.  I am especially enjoying the story and I have already love to hate some of them and love others.  I really like the character of Nancy and was wondering how you came up with the story line?  My other question is this,  Is your novel idea taken from a group that you may be part of, or was it something that came to you from another source?

  I look forward to hearing back from you and I hope you enjoy the discussion.

 

 

 

/

 

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Sunltcloud
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Dear Corinne,

 

One of the things I do when I encounter an author I am unfamiliar with, I look up the author’s background and, if possible, other writing. You’ve made it easy for me, you’ve provided my favorite reading material: a memoir. Reading your story of growing up in Stuyvesant Town, I speculated on the reasons you’ve become a successful writer. Eleven Stories High gave me a few clues for your love of detail.

 

I grew up in a village where life reached my living room window with great immediacy; hunched-over men in drab clothing on their way to work at the leather factory, women carrying baskets with loaves of bread and bottles of milk, my best friend reluctantly pushing her baby sister’s carriage to grandma’s house, the boy next door getting the strap.

When it snowed the narrow, tall staircase of our 400-year old house became a danger zone. In summer our gooseberry bushes and apple trees were a delight to plunder.

 

I had previously not imagined a worldview from the eleventh floor and I realized that it takes sharp observation skills (what are they wearing today and how are they wearing it) to connect to the street level. Add to this a high school teacher mother, the resources of an immigrant family, and a school that inspired competition, but demanded fairness, I think you had to become a detail oriented writer.

 

There has been some discussion about words that had to be looked up when reading “The Writing Circle.” Maybe even a hint that those words are superfluous (yes, I looked up “superfluous” to make sure I am using it properly.) I would like to, respectfully, disagree on this point and direct readers to your bi-lingual family background. I know from my own experience (I am German) that the meaning of words, the closest interpretation, is an important factor when the language of the “motherland” is retained within the family circle. Whether you speak the old language or not, your reminiscences make it clear that phrasing an observation correctly is of importance. Add to this the fact that words are the essence of the writer’s craft, why would you not search for the most precise expression or extend your vocabulary beyond the familiar. 

 

As for the long list of characters we are introduced to in the beginning, I have to admit that I too was at first a bit overwhelmed. It is probably due, in some respect, to the limitations of the e-reading concept that drives nook. Once software has been perfected and one can jump between pages rather than chapters and bookmarks, it will be easier to flip through. My method of retention includes lists of characters that I can add to and refer back to; once I have a printout sitting in front of me I feel more tuned in.

 

I was also slightly uncomfortable, at first, with some of the more intimate details. This might or might not be due to my age. I simply don’t know. But I have to admit that those details are believable; I just don’t like the images they evoke. For instance: on page 93 we get the image of “hair unwashed.” Why not just “hair unkempt?”

 

Other phrases make me think about the difference in perception. For instance, I wonder: does a bad snapshot really change things? (page 93 also) I am a photographer and I want to pierce through the reality of the bad snapshot to find the truth. Is the truth different in a perfectly staged studio shot? On the other hand, I prefer the “reality” of a frown to a forced smile. Whenever I shoot a staged scene (diorama) I shoot the process - something out of place or unfinished. When I take pictures of flowers I show a dropped petal to indicate the continuum. So you have given me a gift here: something to ponder.

 

My question to you is the following: do you prefer writing short stories (I just bought “What We Save for Last”) or writing novels? I suppose complexity of character development is necessary for a novel, and yet there must be a certain amount of satisfaction when content can be whittled down to bare necessity for short fiction.

 

With all this said in my long-winded ways, I wish you the best of luck with “The Writing Circle” and thank you for allowing us to read it first.

 

Regards,

Gisela

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maxcat
Posts: 4,011
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Thank you, Susan..... it is a very complex novel and come Monday we should know what the preface is about. I'm about 50 pages away from the end it the last chapters will surprise you.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Bonnie_C
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hello Corinne,

The way your characters have been introduced to readers has been referred to in other posts as "layering", which is an accurate description.  I felt it was a natural progression of getting to know the players of the story.

 

Did you also go through a "layering" process as you developed these characters?  Or were they more or less complete in your mind when you set down to write the book?

 

Congratulations on a most enjoyable book and best wishes for its success.

 

Bonnie

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sharonslp
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

I am struggling a bit with this message board format to discuss the book, instead of the usual real-life version of a book club. The different threads feel like too many conversations going on at once. I'm never quite sure where to put my thoughts if they don't fit into the question that is asked on a particular thread.

 

But I am no longer struggling with the story! I like the layering that has gone on from the beginning, although I did find the transitions to be somewhat abrupt at first. The characters have piqued my interest from the beginning, but the story did not "grab" me. I finished the second set of chapters, and was still kind of ho-hum. I even considered abandoning the book. I started reading ahead, and oh wow! I didn't see that coming! I don't want to put in any kind of spoiler, so I'll just say that there is no question about finishing this book. I am now reading furiously to see how it all plays out.

 

Some thoughts about Rachel, Nancy, and Virginia:

Rachel....I was a teacher and a school counselor. I am appalled at Rachel's unprofessional conduct in discussing Paul's school issues with her parents. I realize she means well and genuinely cares for Paul. But she is committing a major professional violation.

 

Nancy....too much insecurity. Too many unresolved father issues. She saw a therapist...she needs a new one.

 

Virginia....seems like the most congruent female of the group. Seems to like and accept herself. Seems to see others clearly; their good and their bad. Accepting of people's quirks.

 

I'm wondering if Aimee will stay a one-dimensional character, or if she will turn out to have some redeeming qualities after all.

 

Gillianize.....as a former English teacher, I don't usually approve of turning nouns into verbs. But this one is perfect, Corinne.

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi Gisela,

I enjoyed reading your post and your insights. I wondered though, don't you think that unwashed and unkempt bring two distinct images to mind.

Unkempt implies untidy or a bit messy or perhaps not combed well. To me, unwashed implies dirty and perhaps laziness about one's hygiene. It feels like a far more negative image.

I had the feeling when Nancy referred to the "bad snapshot" creating an image that wasn't true, she was referring to the fact that her mom did that with her drawings. She created Nancy in a "bad" light, with her hair unwashed, in a way she didn't want to see herself. She probably looked a little seedy. It gave her a poor self image.

If the "picture had been good", than Nancy wouldn't have looked unpleasant. Nancy was trying to impart the feeling that her mom evoked in her when she painted her...and it was very negative. Unkempt might not have provided the same impact.

 

For Corinne Demas, my question is:

1-Did you choose the word unwashed to make the negative image more emphatic as in "the great unwashed" an expression that is derogatory and implies that Nancy is not unique but part of the masses or is an ordinary child?

2-Did you mean to imply that her mom did not really like her children and portrayed them as deficient?

3-Did you see her mom as someone so unhappy that she sees the world as a glass that is half empty and that she is unfulfilled as well?

4-Nancy has chosen a career in which she, also, can create imperfect "pictures" or skewed images as she creates characters? She can also correct the imperfect "pictures" of her life as she uses her dad as the model for the character in her novel. Is it coincidental or did you give her that career by design?

 

 

Sunltcloud wrote:

Dear Corinne,...

edited by twj


I was also slightly uncomfortable, at first, with some of the more intimate details. This might or might not be due to my age. I simply don’t know. But I have to admit that those details are believable; I just don’t like the images they evoke. For instance: on page 93 we get the image of “hair unwashed.” Why not just “hair unkempt?”

 

...edited by twj

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Gisela, thank your again for your post. I enjoyed reading about the effect your vantage point's view had on your memories. I posted this on another thread but it seems more relevant here because of your question for Corinne.

 

I am not finding this book difficult to read. I thought it would be oppressive reading it on the computer but I find that the pages fly by. I didn't have much in the way of expectations, except for dread, because I had not read a book online before, so the fact that it is easier than I expected has made it a far more positive experience.

I am letting the characters develop themselves, thinking about each of them in their chapters, almost as if it was a short story. When some continue later on, I feel as If I have gotten a bonus with another window into that life. If I get confused because there are so many characters, it is relatively easy to go back and review my thoughts since the chapters are named for them...edited by twj....

 

Sunltcloud wrote:

Dear Corinne,

 

...edited by twj...

My question to you is the following: do you prefer writing short stories (I just bought “What We Save for Last”) or writing novels? I suppose complexity of character development is necessary for a novel, and yet there must be a certain amount of satisfaction when content can be whittled down to bare necessity for short fiction.

 

With all this said in my long-winded ways, I wish you the best of luck with “The Writing Circle” and thank you for allowing us to read it first.

 

Regards,

Gisela

 

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See_Jane_Read
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hello Corinne,

 

Thank you so much for allowing us to preview your book and welcome to our discussions.  I've never had the opportunity to talk with the author about their work before, so this is very exciting!  My question is in regards to your writing process.  On another thread a discussion took place about how many of the characters' homes reflect their personalities.  One astute poster (forgive me for not citing their screen name, I can't seem to find the post again) to paraphrase commented that Gillian basement smelled of mold which was like Gillian, attractive on the outside but rotting on the inside.  I wondered if you were intentional about including these details about the characters' homes to serve as a metaphor for their personalities?  or do those types of descriptions just arise naturally from the picture of the character that you have in your head as you write?

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Sunltcloud
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Twj,

Yes, absolutely. Unkempt and unwashed bring to mind two distinct images. But for once I didn't read symbolism into the passage: I compared a negative perception with an absolute negative (in my mind). I looked at the two from a photographer's point of view. The unkempt child is an active child, and therefore does not give me the feeling that there is anything wrong. The child with the unwashed hair is showing me an image of neglect. Something is wrong.

 

I do like the "unkempt" child image; I use it myself when I take photographs. I feel that "unkempt" spells reality. Perfect hairdo, smile, Sunday dress are unreal to me. 

 

I do not like the "unwashed" child image. It is disturbing to me. I question the necessity to go that far with an image, unless there is some kind of symbolic evilness involved. (Or a great deal of poverty.) I didn't have the feeling that Nancy's mother was a bad mother and therefore, as writer, I would not have had her draw her own child as unwashed.

 

Throughout the novel I registered images that border on repulsive. An ugly looking lunch, garish dessert, sweaty armpits, loose bowel movements, a stain on a napkin, ugly houses and interiors. It is not the image I question, it is the author's intent. And again, there is nothing wrong with the novel. But am I supposed to feel unwashed or seedy or ugly when I am finished with the book? I refuse to allow this feeling to linger. 

 

I thought long and hard about self-image, about spirit, about the direction I want to take, when I gave myself the screenname "sunltcloud." I try to make something better out of a difficult situation. Maybe that's why I am a hobby writer and not an author, (though I have published a few things along the way)  I don't want to linger over negative thought. I don't want to write a murder scene, a war scene, not even a manipulative female scene. And in order to accomplish a strong plot one has to dig deep into pots of unhappiness, frying pans full of burnt bones and charred brains, and pitchers of blood and human waste. I know, what I am saying here is all a bit bizarre and exaggerated, but that's the only way I can explain my feelings about "unwashed vs. unkempt."

 

TWJ, I hope I was able to make myself clearer.

 

 

thewanderingjew wrote in part:

Hi Gisela,

I enjoyed reading your post and your insights. I wondered though, don't you think that unwashed and unkempt bring two distinct images to mind.

Unkempt implies untidy or a bit messy or perhaps not combed well. To me, unwashed implies dirty and perhaps laziness about one's hygiene. It feels like a far more negative image.

I had the feeling when Nancy referred to the "bad snapshot" creating an image that wasn't true, she was referring to the fact that her mom did that with her drawings. She created Nancy in a "bad" light, with her hair unwashed, in a way she didn't want to see herself. She probably looked a little seedy. It gave her a poor self image.

If the "picture had been good", than Nancy wouldn't have looked unpleasant. Nancy was trying to impart the feeling that her mom evoked in her when she painted her...and it was very negative. Unkempt might not have provided the same impact.

 

 
Sunltcloud wrote:

Dear Corinne,...

edited by twj


I was also slightly uncomfortable, at first, with some of the more intimate details. This might or might not be due to my age. I simply don’t know. But I have to admit that those details are believable; I just don’t like the images they evoke. For instance: on page 93 we get the image of “hair unwashed.” Why not just “hair unkempt?”

 

...edited by twj

 

 

 

 

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Thanks so much for your feedback.

I especially appreciate your comment about Gillianize. I won't try my luck with Nancyizie or Bernardize, though!

 

--Corinne

 

sharonslp wrote:

I am struggling a bit with this message board format to discuss the book, instead of the usual real-life version of a book club. The different threads feel like too many conversations going on at once. I'm never quite sure where to put my thoughts if they don't fit into the question that is asked on a particular thread.

 

But I am no longer struggling with the story! I like the layering that has gone on from the beginning, although I did find the transitions to be somewhat abrupt at first. The characters have piqued my interest from the beginning, but the story did not "grab" me. I finished the second set of chapters, and was still kind of ho-hum. I even considered abandoning the book. I started reading ahead, and oh wow! I didn't see that coming! I don't want to put in any kind of spoiler, so I'll just say that there is no question about finishing this book. I am now reading furiously to see how it all plays out.

 

Some thoughts about Rachel, Nancy, and Virginia:

Rachel....I was a teacher and a school counselor. I am appalled at Rachel's unprofessional conduct in discussing Paul's school issues with her parents. I realize she means well and genuinely cares for Paul. But she is committing a major professional violation.

 

Nancy....too much insecurity. Too many unresolved father issues. She saw a therapist...she needs a new one.

 

Virginia....seems like the most congruent female of the group. Seems to like and accept herself. Seems to see others clearly; their good and their bad. Accepting of people's quirks.

 

I'm wondering if Aimee will stay a one-dimensional character, or if she will turn out to have some redeeming qualities after all.

 

Gillianize.....as a former English teacher, I don't usually approve of turning nouns into verbs. But this one is perfect, Corinne.