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Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: formatting issue

I'm happy to know thisI wonder which reading devices are having a problem with fonts.

 

--Corinne

 

 

wrote:

Hmmm...my copy is on the Nook and there is definately a distinct difference in font and spacing during the scenes from the club meetingsI had no problems at all.

 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: formatting issue

I didn't have much of a problem reading the book on my laptop but I did notice that certain words were handled incorrectly, like pleasure...it read as plea  sure, two words. there were a couple of incidents like that.

Corinne-Demas wrote:

I'm happy to know thisI wonder which reading devices are having a problem with fonts.

 

--Corinne

 

 

wrote:

Hmmm...my copy is on the Nook and there is definately a distinct difference in font and spacing during the scenes from the club meetingsI had no problems at all.

 

 

 

 

Frequent Contributor
GuzziAlfa
Posts: 42
Registered: ‎02-28-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Corrinne,

 

I'm very impressed with how you gave each character their own, individual voices.  As opposed to having a 3rd party or 1st party narrative, each chapter, (something I've questioned before - why so many Nancy titled chapters, etc.), is making more sense to me.  I really like the way you nailed Bernard - so self possessed and clueless sometimes that it was great to see him go through the machinations in his own thinking.... What would Virginia say if I had said that for example.  I could see some of Rachel's mom come through in Rachel's voice too.  Very impressive on how you built each character and even got some of their parents into them.

 

My question after all this -  is how do you develop their voices?  One of my more recent discoveries is Kim Harrison.  In an interview she once said that she runs an MMPI on each character so that as they are put in various situations, she knows better how each would act.

A pretty far out their approach for sure. How do you develop your characters personalities and voices and how do you keep them going under various levels of stress?

 

John S.

Frequent Contributor
GuzziAlfa
Posts: 42
Registered: ‎02-28-2010
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Re: formatting issue

pleasure indeed is one of those words that always comes out plea sure on the nook.  It's a word that is used very frequently in The Writing Circle too.  I'm wondering if the OCR software that converts them to epub's is just seeing it as Plea and Sure.

 

John S.

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi John--

This is a great question!

I spend a lot of time thinking about each character on his/her own before I bring my characters together in a scene.  I try to know everything about them -- their entire life histories, their souls, their minds -- so when they are in a scene I'll be able to predict what they'll do and what' they'll say, and how they say it. 

In my fiction writing class at Mount Holyoke College I have my students write character sketches before they write short stories using their characters-- and I have them not only describe each character but have that character describe him/her self.  I ask them a battery of questions about their character-- ranging form the trivial (i.e. what is his favorite color) to the more profound  (ie.what is he afraid of? ) Obviously it's the more profound question that the story will be built on, but the credibility of the character will depend on the author's familiarity with all the minor details.

 

I'm impressed that you noticed that bit of Virginia in her daughter, Rachel.

 

Thanks for your close reading!

 

--Corinne

 

 

GuzziAlfa wrote:

Corrinne,

 

I'm very impressed with how you gave each character their own, individual voices.  As opposed to having a 3rd party or 1st party narrative, each chapter, (something I've questioned before - why so many Nancy titled chapters, etc.), is making more sense to me.  I really like the way you nailed Bernard - so self possessed and clueless sometimes that it was great to see him go through the machinations in his own thinking.... What would Virginia say if I had said that for example.  I could see some of Rachel's mom come through in Rachel's voice too.  Very impressive on how you built each character and even got some of their parents into them.

 

My question after all this -  is how do you develop their voices?  One of my more recent discoveries is Kim Harrison.  In an interview she once said that she runs an MMPI on each character so that as they are put in various situations, she knows better how each would act.

A pretty far out their approach for sure. How do you develop your characters personalities and voices and how do you keep them going under various levels of stress?

 

John S.

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Connie,

This book presented very real people to me. They all had flaws and insecurities. They were not perfect people, acting perfectly. Paul was that sleeper character coming into his own at the end. Paul was just a kid who had divorced parents, had to live with one or the other, had to make friends or not, etc. When Paul had to attend Gillian's event, I had to chuckle. I could picture my kids having to attend something like that,  Paul took it in stride. Your book is still making me think as I read posts. Everyone has very strong feelings and very different feelings about scenes and characters in the book. That all makes a good book.

Thank You. Luanne

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: Questions for Corinne Demas


pen21 wrote:

Connie,

This book presented very real people to me. They all had flaws and insecurities. They were not perfect people, acting perfectly. Paul was that sleeper character coming into his own at the end. Paul was just a kid who had divorced parents, had to live with one or the other, had to make friends or not, etc. When Paul had to attend Gillian's event, I had to chuckle. I could picture my kids having to attend something like that,  Paul took it in stride. Your book is still making me think as I read posts. Everyone has very strong feelings and very different feelings about scenes and characters in the book. That all makes a good book.

Thank You. Luanne


 

pen..Very good points.It seems like so much a part of life,in TWC.Of course some events we would not like it happening to anyone we love or care about..I felt closer to Paul and somewhat to Rachel..They seemed to have a start of a good friendship A healthy one at that. With all of our vivid imaginations we have all probably written a sequel..Susan Vtc

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: formatting issue

I also noticed that the word pleasure always read as plea sure.  I used my PC to read the book.

Literature 

 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

I didn't have much of a problem reading the book on my laptop but I did notice that certain words were handled incorrectly, like pleasure...it read as plea  sure, two words. there were a couple of incidents like that.

Corinne-Demas wrote:

I'm happy to know thisI wonder which reading devices are having a problem with fonts.

 

--Corinne

 

 

wrote:

Hmmm...my copy is on the Nook and there is definately a distinct difference in font and spacing during the scenes from the club meetingsI had no problems at all.

 

 

 

 


 

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010

Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Dear Luanne--

This make me feel so good!  What I want more than anything is to have my readers believe in my characters.  (I don't expect them to like them all, however-- just as in real life not everyone likes everyone!)  And I want my novel to make  readers think.

 

I can tell from reading the posts that First Book Book Club members are a divergent group of readers, with a wide variety of tastes.  I couldn't imagine that my novel would appeal to everyone, so I'm not surprised to hear that there are some readers who really prefer a different kind of book.  What I hope, though, is that some of the readers who found themselves involved in discussing the kind of book they would never have chosen for themselves might discover that they're interested in it nevertheless. And that some might even like it! 

 

--Corinne

 


pen21 wrote:

Connie,

This book presented very real people to me. They all had flaws and insecurities. They were not perfect people, acting perfectly. Paul was that sleeper character coming into his own at the end. Paul was just a kid who had divorced parents, had to live with one or the other, had to make friends or not, etc. When Paul had to attend Gillian's event, I had to chuckle. I could picture my kids having to attend something like that,  Paul took it in stride. Your book is still making me think as I read posts. Everyone has very strong feelings and very different feelings about scenes and characters in the book. That all makes a good book.

Thank You. Luanne


 

 

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

We are a divergent group, Corinne, and I hope you have enjoyed the conversations. I will be recommending/buying your book to friends, but will suggest the hardback form for most of them as it is easier to back up and re-read. It has been a pleasure meeting you.  :smileyhappy:

 


Corinne-Demas wrote:

Dear Luanne--

This make me feel so good!  What I want more than anything is to have my readers believe in my characters.  (I don't expect them to like them all, however-- just as in real life not everyone likes everyone!)  And I want my novel to make  readers think.

 

I can tell from reading the posts that First Book Book Club members are a divergent group of readers, with a wide variety of tastes.  I couldn't imagine that my novel would appeal to everyone, so I'm not surprised to hear that there are some readers who really prefer a different kind of book.  What I hope, though, is that some of the readers who found themselves involved in discussing the kind of book they would never have chosen for themselves might discover that they're interested in it nevertheless. And that some might even like it! 

 

--Corinne

 


pen21 wrote:

Connie,

This book presented very real people to me. They all had flaws and insecurities. They were not perfect people, acting perfectly. Paul was that sleeper character coming into his own at the end. Paul was just a kid who had divorced parents, had to live with one or the other, had to make friends or not, etc. When Paul had to attend Gillian's event, I had to chuckle. I could picture my kids having to attend something like that,  Paul took it in stride. Your book is still making me think as I read posts. Everyone has very strong feelings and very different feelings about scenes and characters in the book. That all makes a good book.

Thank You. Luanne


 

 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Many thanks! It's been a pleasure for me to meet all of you. I have been enjoying the conversations immenselyIt's exciting for me to hear my characters being discussed as if they are living, breathing people.  (In fact, they seem that way to me, too.)

 

I would think that there are some books better suited than mine  to reading on an electronic deviceBeing able to flip back and forth easily is so important in a novel were you have a lot of characters, and where there are images or ideas you might want to refer to againOf course I'm kind of old-fashioned. For me reading a book is a tactile and visual experienceHyperion did a beautiful job with the hardback (I recently got my author copies.) I love the design--the layout and the choice of fonts-- it's the kind of book you really want to hold. And the cover is terrificThe leaves on the book are shiny, against the matte background

The book book will be out July 6th-- do look for it!

 

 

 


DSaff wrote:

We are a divergent group, Corinne, and I hope you have enjoyed the conversations. I will be recommending/buying your book to friends, but will suggest the hardback form for most of them as it is easier to back up and re-read. It has been a pleasure meeting you:smileyhappy:

 


Corinne-Demas wrote:

Dear Luanne--

This make me feel so goodWhat I want more than anything is to have my readers believe in my characters.  (I don't expect them to like them all, however-- just as in real life not everyone likes everyone!)  And I want my novel to make  readers think.

 

I can tell from reading the posts that First Book Book Club members are a divergent group of readers, with a wide variety of tastesI couldn't imagine that my novel would appeal to everyone, so I'm not surprised to hear that there are some readers who really prefer a different kind of bookWhat I hope, though, is that some of the readers who found themselves involved in discussing the kind of book they would never have chosen for themselves might discover that they're interested in it nevertheless. And that some might even like it

 

--Corinne

 


pen21 wrote:

Connie,

This book presented very real people to me. They all had flaws and insecurities. They were not perfect people, acting perfectly. Paul was that sleeper character coming into his own at the end. Paul was just a kid who had divorced parents, had to live with one or the other, had to make friends or not, etc. When Paul had to attend Gillian's event, I had to chuckle. I could picture my kids having to attend something like thatPaul took it in stride. Your book is still making me think as I read posts. Everyone has very strong feelings and very different feelings about scenes and characters in the book. That all makes a good book.

Thank You. Luanne


 

 


 

 


 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Corinne,

I think your book worked fine on a nook. I have had my nook since January. With each book I read I tried to learn a little more about the nook, how to navigate, how to page, etc. With your book I concentrated on being able to jump around more. To go back and look at a scene or chapter again. Your book helped me learn that, because it was important to go back and reread certain things again. I felt very comfortable reading your book on the nook. It was a great experience.

Thanks for sharing your book with us. Luanne

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,829
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi Corinne,

I will also be recommending the print version of the book, unless they are a seasoned e-reader user. I think being able to flip back through the pages would have helped me a great deal.

I wish you the best of luck with it and it was a pleasure having you here with us to help us decipher a passage, a chapter or a thought. I know you helped me understand a lot.

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

I think the nook update 1.4 came just a bit late for this book, but from now on we will be able to "go to page" number which makes it easier to flick back and forth.

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Thank you so much!  I've loved being a part of this community.

 

--Corinne

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Thank you,  Luanne.

I think for novice "nookers" my book might be a bit of a challenge.

 

--Corinne

 


pen21 wrote:

Corinne,

I think your book worked fine on a nook. I have had my nook since January. With each book I read I tried to learn a little more about the nook, how to navigate, how to page, etc. With your book I concentrated on being able to jump around more. To go back and look at a scene or chapter again. Your book helped me learn that, because it was important to go back and reread certain things again. I felt very comfortable reading your book on the nook. It was a great experience.

Thanks for sharing your book with us. Luanne


 

 

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi Corinne,

 

Gillian used the name M.G. Findlay for her novel.  The "G" I would assume is for Gillian.  Findlay was the town in Ohio that her aunt is from.  What does the "M" stand for?

 

 

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas

Hi-- You've asked a question I never imagined anyone would ask!

the "M" doesn't stand for anything-- Gillian (always the poet) picked it for the sound

 

Thank you for being such an astute reader.

 

--Corinne

 

 


literature wrote:

Hi Corinne,

 

Gillian used the name M.G. Findlay for her novelThe "G" I would assume is for GillianFindlay was the town in Ohio that her aunt is fromWhat does the "M" stand for?

 

 


 

 

Wordsmith
babzilla41
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎05-04-2009
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Re: Questions for Corinne Demas


Corinne-Demas wrote:

Thanks so much for putting this question on the table.

 It's so interesting to me to hear what you readers are thinking-- and I keep discovering things about my own novel that I hadn't realized were there.

What I imagined was that Gillian sleeps with Professor Jacobson after they've had dinner (there's a suggestion that it's in trade for him approving her thesis.)

He calls her Blanche because he's created a romantic vision of her.  (The name Blanche means "white, fair one"- it's a name of French queens)  He's not really seeing her, the real young woman ( a student!) but is engaged in his own sexual fantasy. I thought, perhaps, readers might feel some (just a little?) sympathy for Gillian in this scene-- might see it as an older man (who has power over her) taking advantage of her.

 

--Corinne

 

 

 

 

 

 

maxcat wrote:

Corrine, I think this is a question on people's minds now that some of us finished the book. Who is Blanche? As someone suggested, Gillian might be thinking about a time when she slept with the professor. Is this true, a delusion of hers?

 

Thanks, maxcat

 

 


 

Ms. Demas: 

 

Interestingly I did not see Gillian's professor taking advantage of her; I saw it as her way of getting what she wanted, i.e. approval of her thesis.  I thought she was driving that train all on her own.  She never struck me as the type of person who ever got taken advantage of but one who always did the taking!  Poor Professor Jacobson!  In his throes of passion when he's calling her Blanche she's probably calling him "sucker".   Sorry no sympathy for Ms. Gillian.

 

Thank you for a most interesting read.

 

b

"I love books. If I could eat them, I would. I love their scent and often put my nose in to inhale their aroma." - Kathleen Grissom
Wordsmith
babzilla41
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎05-04-2009
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Re: formatting issue


literature wrote:

I also noticed that the word pleasure always read as plea sure.  I used my PC to read the book.

Literature 

 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

I didn't have much of a problem reading the book on my laptop but I did notice that certain words were handled incorrectly, like pleasure...it read as plea  sure, two words. there were a couple of incidents like that.

Corinne-Demas wrote:

I'm happy to know thisI wonder which reading devices are having a problem with fonts.

 

--Corinne

 

 

wrote:

Hmmm...my copy is on the Nook and there is definately a distinct difference in font and spacing during the scenes from the club meetingsI had no problems at all.

 

 

 

 


 


 

Same happens on iPad.

 

b

"I love books. If I could eat them, I would. I love their scent and often put my nose in to inhale their aroma." - Kathleen Grissom