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Sarah-Landis
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Re: Questions for Corinne's editor, Sarah Landis

B&N does a great job trying to introduce new authors.  They have their "Discover" program where they pick debut books.  You can walk into any B&N and find the Discover picks.  I also think reviews in magazines, your local paper or national paper are still a really good source for finding new books.  I still wander the bookstore and pick up books I've never heard of--especially if they are endorsed by some of my favorite writers.  For Corinne's novel, she got endorsements from Anita Shrive and Karen Joy Fowler.  Or check out who's reading at your local bookstore.  We aren't sending authors on tours as much because we can't get a big enough audience, but I still think it's a great way for readers and authors to connect.

 

Suetj wrote:

Sarah-as you mentioned there are so many great new authors out there...what references does a reader go to when finding some of these new authors.  Are there websites like Barnes and Noble that lists these new books but unknown authors?  I always am researching for these new disocerys and BN does a great job uncovering these treasures but was wondering if there are additionl resourses for this?  Thank you for your insights on the editing of The writing Cirlce!

 

 

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Sarah-Landis
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Re: Questions for Corinne's editor, Sarah Landis

I completely understand why you're hesitant to take a chance on a new author.  Books are a relatively expensive form of entertainment compared with other things.  Word of mouth is still the number one way people hear about books.  I also trust the recommendations of my sister or my best friend over everything else.  That's why I still always have hope that really good books will get found.  But that's not always the case.  I think e-books have opened another door for readers.  It's funny to me that we in publishing were so concerned that the introduction of these e-book devices like the NOOK would cut into regular book sales.  Like others have said, people read MORE with their e-book because it's so easy to download and so convenient.  I have readers who say they carry their device everywhere from the carpool line to the playground to the post office.  I also think there's that impulse buy factor where you may have just finished reading a book electronically and you buy the second one immediately because you just can't wait, whereas you may wait to buy it in book form or forget to buy it if you have to go into a bookstore.  And maybe e-book readers take a chance on unknown authors more because they don't have to commit to the physical object?  How do you all find the reading experience different on a electronic device? 

 

 

 

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BethAnnH
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Registered: ‎05-04-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne's editor, Sarah Landis

I have always been an avid reader, but the NOOK has changed my reading habits a great deal.   I now have more time to read and I have access to books more quickly.  The time comes from BN because of their ereader for the IPod, Blackberry and computer.  I have it loaded on all of my divices so I can access my books at any time with out carrying a physical book around. If I get a break at work and I can fit in a chapter, if i'm standing in a long line at the store I can read on my blackberry, stuck in traffic no problem, and the list goes on and on. I actually look forward to being Delayed! The other thing I think you are right on about are the books that are in a series, you can now get the 2nd, 3rd..etc right away with out waiting and that does make a big difference when trying to find time to get to the book store or library.  Also I had run out of room on my book shelfs for actual books.   Just a little side note, my granddaugter who is almost 3 also enjoys the NOOK, we have been reading Fair tales on it and she likes to turn the page.

 

 

Sarah-Landis wrote:

I completely understand why you're hesitant to take a chance on a new author.  Books are a relatively expensive form of entertainment compared with other things.  Word of mouth is still the number one way people hear about books.  I also trust the recommendations of my sister or my best friend over everything else.  That's why I still always have hope that really good books will get found.  But that's not always the case.  I think e-books have opened another door for readers.  It's funny to me that we in publishing were so concerned that the introduction of these e-book devices like the NOOK would cut into regular book sales.  Like others have said, people read MORE with their e-book because it's so easy to download and so convenient.  I have readers who say they carry their device everywhere from the carpool line to the playground to the post office.  I also think there's that impulse buy factor where you may have just finished reading a book electronically and you buy the second one immediately because you just can't wait, whereas you may wait to buy it in book form or forget to buy it if you have to go into a bookstore.  And maybe e-book readers take a chance on unknown authors more because they don't have to commit to the physical object?  How do you all find the reading experience different on a electronic device? 

 

 

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
krb2g
Posts: 289
Registered: ‎02-05-2008
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Re: Questions for Corinne's editor, Sarah Landis

 

Sarah-Landis wrote:

I completely understand why you're hesitant to take a chance on a new author.  Books are a relatively expensive form of entertainment compared with other things.  Word of mouth is still the number one way people hear about books.  I also trust the recommendations of my sister or my best friend over everything else.  That's why I still always have hope that really good books will get found.  But that's not always the case.  I think e-books have opened another door for readers.  It's funny to me that we in publishing were so concerned that the introduction of these e-book devices like the NOOK would cut into regular book sales.  Like others have said, people read MORE with their e-book because it's so easy to download and so convenient.  I have readers who say they carry their device everywhere from the carpool line to the playground to the post office.  I also think there's that impulse buy factor where you may have just finished reading a book electronically and you buy the second one immediately because you just can't wait, whereas you may wait to buy it in book form or forget to buy it if you have to go into a bookstore.  And maybe e-book readers take a chance on unknown authors more because they don't have to commit to the physical object?  How do you all find the reading experience different on a electronic device? 

 

 

 

 

 

I tend to use my electronic device for freebies of various sorts, for backup, and for things that aren't published as books, rather than actually buying books for it. I find the e-reader far superior to reading on a computer screen, so for things that are published as e-books only (for example, Star Wars has a series of novellas that are published as e-books), or things that are offered for free as e-books, I'm quite happy to use an e-reader. I'm still a little nervous about file types--I'm not convinced if I spend a lot of money on e-books, especially in some retailer's proprietary or DRM-locked format, that the format won't change and become useless on a future generation of e-reading devices. For that reason, I prefer e-books that aren't DRM locked (although I am *happy* to pay for some types of digital content) and prefer e-books that I can also keep as a more normal file on my computer (for example the google books or project gutenberg content that I can also save as a .pdf). 

 

I also use the e-reader as a sort of back-up. I study literature, so, for example, last year, when I was taking my big, comprehensive exams, many of the books on the list were in the public domain. I found them, put them on my e-reader, and then had the ability to check little things in my spare moments. I read them all in a physical format, but it was nice also to be able to carry almost all of them around with me. 

 

Finally I use the e-reader for things that aren't books that I'd otherwise waste a lot of paper printing or have to read at the computer. For example, journal articles, other peoples' books from NaNoWriMo, and books that are in the public domain but out of print are all things I've put on the e-reader from time to time. 

 

***

As far as reading new authors goes/spending money on more than the same 2-3 people: I have always been a voracious reader. But I use the library very actively (at the moment, I have ~200 books from the University library piled on a bookshelf in my room; I have a bunch on hold at the public library as well). Because I have a limited amount of space and money, and own about 1200 books, I am very hesitant to buy books of an unfamiliar author. More often I will make a note of the name and get the book from the library (and I will say, I'm not shy about asking *the library* to buy these books). Occasionally, I will like what I read at the library so much I will buy the book for myself. I can find older (say pre-1950s) works very well on my own, and have amassed quite a reading list. But I will say, for contemporary reads, Barnes & Noble (through the First Look Program, the Discover new writers recommendations, display tables, and especially the Science Fiction & Fantasy boards & First Look community rooms) has done me well. I am so much more likely to look at a book when someone I know or someone whose opinion I trust thanks to their posts says "You have to read this book!"

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See_Jane_Read
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Registered: ‎05-03-2010
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Re: Questions for Corinne's editor, Sarah Landis

I'm relieved to hear that as an editor you're not frightened of the ebook boom.  I always worry that publishers will jack up the prices of ebooks because they are afraid they won't make a profit off of ebooks.  Personally, I read A LOT more now that I have a Nook and the reason is convenience.  There is nothing I love more than browsing through a library or a book store and leafing through books that I might be interested in, but try doing that with a 2 year old and a 4 year old!  Not gonna happen.  They don't have the patience to watch mommy look for books and I don't have the stamina to endure the temper tantrums.  Yesterday, I went in to B&N for the voucher for the free Elizabeth Berg book and I took my two children.  It was a nightmare!  There was a Toy Story display that you couldn't miss and they wanted me to buy Bullseye and Slinky dog, when I said "no, sorry guys, that's not in the budget this week" I had to drag two crying screaming children from the store...and that my friends is why I haven't been in a bookstore in 4 years!  But now on my Nook I can browse from home and find everything I want.  I have purchased more books in the last four months with my Nook than I have in the last 4 years.

 

 

Sarah-Landis wrote:

I completely understand why you're hesitant to take a chance on a new author.  Books are a relatively expensive form of entertainment compared with other things.  Word of mouth is still the number one way people hear about books.  I also trust the recommendations of my sister or my best friend over everything else.  That's why I still always have hope that really good books will get found.  But that's not always the case.  I think e-books have opened another door for readers.  It's funny to me that we in publishing were so concerned that the introduction of these e-book devices like the NOOK would cut into regular book sales.  Like others have said, people read MORE with their e-book because it's so easy to download and so convenient.  I have readers who say they carry their device everywhere from the carpool line to the playground to the post office.  I also think there's that impulse buy factor where you may have just finished reading a book electronically and you buy the second one immediately because you just can't wait, whereas you may wait to buy it in book form or forget to buy it if you have to go into a bookstore.  And maybe e-book readers take a chance on unknown authors more because they don't have to commit to the physical object?  How do you all find the reading experience different on a electronic device? 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Corinne's editor, Sarah Landis

I absolutely love the e-reading experience. I travel a great deal and have filled my nook with all sorts of reading material. Right from the beginning I took advantage of the large amount of free google books at B&N. Travelogues, memoirs, classics, old biographies, I spent days downloading and now have about 100 free reads. Not too long ago I went to Solvang (California) where I found a Hans Christian Andersen museum, which re-introduced me to one of my childhood authors. I immediately downloaded thirteen pieces, some biographies, an autobiography, several travelogues etc. And while I can’t download new material when I am away from the US, I have gathered quite a lot of material for my next trip, a cruise through the Adriatic Sea.

 

The only question will be, since the browser on nook is only a limited beta version, should I take my Netbook on the cruise or nook? I have installed the B&N e-reader on all my devices and can read books at my desktop, my laptop, my Netbook, and my nook. Reading on the phone is not an option for me; I’m 71 and I can barely see who called me, without putting on my glasses.

 

The one big feature on any dedicated e-reader (I have a Kindle too) is the e-ink feature. It makes all the difference in the world when it comes to respecting the health of my eyes. Without the backlighting of regular electronic devices I feel much less eyestrain, and, of course, I can read at the beach without worrying about the glare of the sun.

 

Whatever features are still missing on nook, those requested by consumers and those imagined by developers, I’m sure we will get software updates and eventually a nook2 which will get us closer to the best reading experience. And, I think that even publishers, who were quite uneasy about the arrival of electronic reading devices, will eventually adjust and benefit from this new way of distributing books. I, as photographer, remember quite clearly the first digital camera I used, wondering if I would ever get used to not having my darkroom to amuse me. Now I can think of nothing better than, almost instantly, being able to print out an eight by ten, in high gloss, of my favorite new doll, or send a postcard of a scene from my recent stay to a relative the same day I arrive home.

 

In other words, I love my nook, my computers, my digital cameras, my modern life. I wish my mother, who wrote short stories and painted, had been able to witness this new age. I remember her frequent trips to the library for research, many times in sleet and snow. And here I sit, often late at night, in my pajamas, searching the world for books, for images, for news, for whatever I desire. Well, except that the cookies imbedded in my computer are virtual connections to the super highway; for the real thing I still have to go to my cupboard.

 

 

Sarah-Landis wrote in part:

  I think e-books have opened another door for readers.  It's funny to me that we in publishing were so concerned that the introduction of these e-book devices like the NOOK would cut into regular book sales.  Like others have said, people read MORE with their e-book because it's so easy to download and so convenient.  I have readers who say they carry their device everywhere from the carpool line to the playground to the post office.  I also think there's that impulse buy factor where you may have just finished reading a book electronically and you buy the second one immediately because you just can't wait, whereas you may wait to buy it in book form or forget to buy it if you have to go into a bookstore.  And maybe e-book readers take a chance on unknown authors more because they don't have to commit to the physical object?  How do you all find the reading experience different on a electronic device?