Reply
Moderator
Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

How is fidelity a major subject of the novel, in terms of all the kinds of relationships presented--in love relationships, in friendships, and among peers? What are some of the ways characters are faithful, and in what ways do characters betray each other?

 

How does jealousy play a role in the novel, and for whom? Is there any jealousy that might be considered healthy?

 

How do you re-evaluate the characters other than Gillian in these final chapters? Have new aspects of each (or any) of them been revealed to us?

 

How do you see the ideas of justice and injustice here--are the issues always clear, or are we left with any ambiguity about events that outrage us in the novel?

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I absolutely believe that fidelity is a big part of this novel. While the biggest part of fidelity to me is trust, here are some other definitions from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fidelity 
1. strict observance of promises, duties, etc.: a servant's fidelity.
2. loyalty: fidelity to one's country.
3. conjugal faithfulness.
4. adherence to fact or detail.
  
We read about friendships, parent-child relationships, teacher-student relationships, and the relationships of those in the Writing Circle. Some worked and some didn't, but it was easy to see empathy in many of the characters. Most of the relationships worked well enough for the people involved to be in the same room at the same time. <grin>
  
I guess I should have expected Gillian to steal something. She always wanted it to be about her, but the others seemed to enjoy each other's work and Nancy fit right in. Gillian seemed jealous of Nancy, probably for more than the writing. Nancy had a relationship with a man where unconditional love went both ways. While Gillian knew her husband loved her, I don't know if she knew the meaning of giving unconditional love. She certainly did not live up to the standard of holding another's work as off limits. She wasn't faithful and loyal to the group. BTW, the book I thought she wrote was about the people in her group causing her to hide it from everyone. It wasn't until Nancy had the reaction that she did that I realized what had happened. Fidelity is not any part of Gillian's character. I think there was jealousy on the part of many in the group, most of it the type that spurs you on to better yourself. Gillian's was the strongest and went way to far. She felt that the end justified the means, but tragically, saw that it didn't in the end.
  
One of the things that had me cheering was that the majority of the group felt that Gillian was wrong and were on Nancy's side. They were faithful to the spirit of the group, to the sanctity of each other's writing.
  
I think the thing that outraged me the most is the way Gillian would have gotten away with everything if the proof from her college days hadn't been found in time. She thought she had made enough changes for it to be her own novel. Because Gillian didn't like the track of Nancy's story, she felt she had the right and obligation to fix it. Gillian's self-absorption came shining through. Justice was served when she was denied the Pulitzer, but injustice won out when she killed Paul. I would have liked to find out what happened with Nancy's story; if things were made right for her.

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Determination

This quote from page 228 spoke to me about research and determination. This is the reason Nancy never gave up.

 

"She had trained herself to believe that all information was there, somewhere, and it was just a matter of meticulous searching until you finally uncovered it."

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I think Adam plays a big role in finding that he leaves Kim to go to Gillian. Gillian just laughs him off and he he leaves. He helps Nancy find some valuable material dating back to Gillian's college days in order to get back at her. to him,once finding that information was justice for him concerning Gillian.

I feel Kim was hurt badly when Adam broke of the relationship. She was upset enough to come to Gillian and Jerry's house and wanted to see Adam. Only he wasn't there.

I think the only couple that is left standing as faithful is Oates and Nancy. Virginia and Joe would be another one, but we don't know a lot about them. Oates listens to everything Nancy tells him and he either agrees or disagrees but they never get into fights.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

So many of the characters have weak "moral compasses" that I think Nancy's statement kind of summed up a theme in the book. She, who was so ethical, questioned herself while many of the others "coveted their neighbor's wives", so to speak. Fidelity seemed to be treated as some kind of a nuisance not something to be sought after or practiced. It was almost as if some of the characters were always waiting for the best offer...like someone who doesn't say yes to an invitation because they are waiting for a better one so they hold the first offer in hand while they wait for others and sure enough, here comes temptation!

 

Many of the "good" upstanding characters  were thrown under the bus by their partners because a better deal came around or because they wanted to please themselves, first and foremost, without considering the effect of their actions on the person upon whom they were hurting. Virginia was thrown by Bernard, Kim by Adam etc., Nancy's mom was discarded by her dad as well. Perhaps that is why Nancy felt so strongly about being "good" for her dad, so he wouldn't discard her, Perhaps that is why she was so insecure about Oate's love for her.

 

Many of the characters were flighty in their treatment of morality, marriage, truth, honor, etc. They lied easily, looked away from wrongdoing and just had knee jerk reactions to save themselves, etc. Virginia was one of the characters I admired because she always seemed to want to do the right thing, even if it somehow compromised her own position or personal needs.

 

It saddens me a bit to think that the real world is probably more like this book than most of us would like to imagine. Justice is not always served. Is Gillian's demise too harsh a punishment for her previous wrongdoings? Is it fair to get the ticket for the time you were speeding once before, even though this time you are innocent? Should Adam have dumped Kim in such a trivial manner, showing her little or no respect? Justice is supposed to be blind and in some ways that means all the facts are not always revealed and consequences are therefore beyond our control and not always fair. Life is not a fairy tale.

 

Rachel-K wrote:

How is fidelity a major subject of the novel, in terms of all the kinds of relationships presented--in love relationships, in friendships, and among peers? What are some of the ways characters are faithful, and in what ways do characters betray each other?

 

How do you see the ideas of justice and injustice here--are the issues always clear, or are we left with any ambiguity about events that outrage us in the novel?

 

 

Contributor
donna128
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎05-03-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I found that the novel did not flow easily and I had to keep stopping to refresh my memory of who and where "we" were.  I did not feel that I had enough time with each character to develop a bond. 

Contributor
Katy_Beth
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎04-09-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I think there was a part of me that made me start to invest in characters that left me flat in the end or who proved to not be the person I had come to admire.  I think that the trying to almost make me feel sorry in the end for Gillian and then showing again her total lack of feeling was like being jerked back and forth. 

 

I see this trend a lot lately in some of the new movies and books out there that seem to want to be more "realistic" so they some how leave everything "unchanged" as far as the developement of the characters growth as people.  They are the same or worse than when they started.

 

This approach or attitude might be more like people in real life but when I watch or read something I want to be taken out of the normal human fray as it were.  I want to find something better.  Even if its complete nonescence I want to feel like the people were somehow better than when they started.  That even the "bad guy" can either grow or suffer true justice. 

 

I finished the book feeling like is this it.  Is this the end.  Those who were better turned out to be less than what they could be, those who truly didn't seem to have a moral fiber in their bodies while somehow effect still seemed to be living outside of their actions, and one of the truly innocent bystanders in the whole thing is the very one that ends up dead. I was left with an empty feeling.  I didn't really feel that justice was done at all, that fidelity was not necessary, and frankly I felt like some of the characters really needed a swift kick to see just how thier own insecurity ruined everything around them. 

Contributor
Zyna
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎01-07-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

How do you see the ideas of justice and injustice here--are the issues always clear, or are we left with any ambiguity about events that outrage us in the novel?

 

I think that, for Gillian, justice is definitely served at the conclusion of the novel. Gillian betrayed Nancy and the Leopardis' trust when she stole the story of Nancy's father from her and twisted it into a story in which he was put on trial and made to pay for his negligence. Her actions prompted Nancy to go in search of vengeance, but at the conclusion of the novel, it is clear that Nancy's actions play a small role in serving retribution and karma takes things largely into its own hands.

 

I do feel, however, that the story should have delved--at least briefly--into what happened after Gillian was arrested. I feel that perhaps there should have been another chapter focusing on Adam--as Kim's ending up at Paul and Gillian's was largely his fault--as well as on the status of Nancy and the Leopardis after her arrest. I do not think that Gillian was the main character of the novel, and so, by ending the novel on her chapter, I do not feel that the novel has had its proper conclusion.

Frequent Contributor
jbg78
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎09-02-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Jealous and fidelity are major themes in this novel.  I think that it is hard to have one without the other in relationships. The people in the book that don't have these issues are secondary.  The characters have these qualities both professionally and personally.  The only thing they seem faithful to is to the promotion of themselves.

A book is like a garden carried in the pocket. ~Chinese Proverb~
Frequent Contributor
BethAnnH
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎05-04-2010

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Fidelity (loyalty, devotion,allegiance): Faithfulness to something to which one is bound by pledge or duty.

I think fidelity was at the center of entire book.   Within the group is self, which was broken by Gillian when she stoled Nancy's book idea.   Within each of their own private relationships, they all had problems, and even when it came to the children of the group members, within the book. I don't feel that Bernard, Gillian nor Jerry for that matter were loyal or devoted to their children.  I think of all the characters, Virginia and Nancy were the most faithful, to themselves and those around them.  Virginia was the one that made it possible for Nancy to find the information needed to help in de-throning  Gillian, but Nancy did not do this without paying a price to her own soul.  Reminds me of the saying "Be careful what you ask for, you may get it"  Nancy got what she wanted but what did it cost her.   Adam had his own reasons for doing what he did, but Chris I think was right up there with Virginia because he really didn't have an ulterior motive, expect that what Gillian did was wrong on so many levels and something needed done.  Bernard, just takes up space,  I can find nothing good to say about him. 

 

Sometimes I think the words  "Healthy Jealousy" belong on the Oxymoron list.  All jealousy has the potential to hurt someone if not others at least your self. This book was full of jealousy and I found most of it to be within Gillian. I stated before, she didn't want certain things or people but she didn't want anyone else to have them either i.e she didn't want Adam but was jealousy when she saw him with Kim.  There was the hint in the book that the same thing happened with Bernard.  Nancy's novel, Paul's relationship with his mother.  

 

When talking about justice or injustice, it would depend on what side of the fence you are sitting one.  Justice for one person could be injustice for the other person or the other way around.   This book for me was like watching a pebble thrown into the pond and seeing how far the ripple affect would go.  Nancy was the pebble and the ripple effect was far reaching.  Some things may have happened whether or not Nancy joined the group, such as the Adam and Gilliam affair, but I don't think other things would have happened, such as Paul's death. Without Nancy, there was no stolen book, therefore no lost Pulitzer, no sneaking out of the house with truck lights off.  

 

I very much enjoyed the book, at 1st I was somewhat confused by the ending.  Why was Gillian chosen, why the scene with the 1st professor that accused her of cheating.  But then it all made sense at least to my way of thinking.  Gillian made the biggest impact that will be long lasting on all of their lives, and all my thoughts of Gilliam were confirmed, she was and is the unfeeling, uncaring "Evil Witch" of the story.    I am glad it ended where it did.  I don't want to read how the death of Paul may affect the others and what they may feel was their part in it.  A lot of "what if's" like  " Would this have happened if we hadn't taken the Pulitzer from her".  The ripple effect continues even when you close the book.  To me a book you can't forget is the best kind of book.  

 

 

 

Inspired Correspondent
Amanda-Louise
Posts: 156
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Final Chapters and Whole Novel (my thoughts)

RACHEL

 

The start of this chapter says that Rachel is older which I hadn't thought.  I was sure she was in her early 20s.  Rachel's affection for Paul seem a bit misdirected somehow.  There is a small lack of innocence there. The fact that she briefly considers having him move in is just odd in a way.  But again, not in a sexual way.

 

VIRGINIA

 

As soon as Paul mentioned the secret novel I wondered what was the story behind it.  Now I really want to know!

 

NANCY

 

Gillian stole Nancy's novel.  Wow.  Something I should think every member of a writing group considers at times.  They must fear exposing their unpublished works for fear of an idea being stolen.  Now I'm really interested in the book. This thread is quite good.

 

PAUL

 

I hope that the issue between Gillian and Nancy doesn't remain an unresolved slap!

 

CHRIS

 

Curious how this is all going to play out.  How awkward will the next Leopardi Circle be?!  The car and headlights theme must be leading somewhere.....

 

BERNARD

 

This chapter painted Bernard with a whole new brush.  Aimee (and Horace) have taken him from a pompous ass whose lovable eccentricities are indulged by everyone to a weak, common nanny who kowtows to Aimee's every wish.  He comes across as rather pathetic.  I'm not sure why the Leopardi Circle must disband - they are obviously very protective of each other.  I agree with Bernard - why not just ask Gillian to leave?

 

ADAM

 

I guess we are seeing everyone's bad side.  Adam was a total jerk to Kim and now it's revealed he's been basically stalking Gillian.  I'm finding this last part of the novel very readable and wonder where this dramatic tension was throughout.

 

NANCY

 

I thought Adam's connection to Gillian was so strong that he had come along with Nancy in order to sabotage her research in some way.  I was pleasantly surprised to find that he really was there for Nancy (or for his own case against Gillian).

 

PAUL

 

I had not foreseen the accident at all!!

 

GILLIAN

 

She knew she hit something and didn't even stop!  And she even suspected it was a person.  As it turns out she killed the only person she ever loved.  I kind of feel as though I have a whole novel ahead of me I'll never get to read.....

 

--------------

 

This is a literary book about writers, written by a writer for writers.  I'm also under the impression that it would have made a FABULOUS short story, but was filled with much 'fluff' (in a way) to fill the requirements of a novel.

 

 

Moderator
dhaupt
Posts: 11,827
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

[ Edited ]

I am going to respond before reading other replies

 

First of all I have to wonder if this would have been a better read for me if I had read it all through and not read on schedule. So I'm not going to be reviewing it until I can do that.

 

Fidelity seems to be popping up all over the novel from Bernard, to Gillian to Adam but I never saw it a a subject in the novel just a result of people wanting what the want and not caring the outcome of their actions to others.

 

I don't see jealousy as a major role here at all, jealousy is just a reaction from the infidelity and the two go hand in hand.

 

the characters in my humble opinion were very much left to their own devices in the end, I don't feel that the book was completed and have more questions than answers left at the end.

 

The injustices way outway the justices, Gillian sees what she wants, steps over anyone she can to get it and the he-l with the rest of the world. She still doesn't see any of this as 1) her fault 2) wrong. Think of her comment at the end, is it a crime if you think you hit a deer. Paleese!

Correspondent
StewiesMom
Posts: 83
Registered: ‎10-09-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

How is fidelity a major subject of the novel, in terms of all the kinds of relationships presented--in love relationships, in friendships, and among peers? What are some of the ways characters are faithful, and in what ways do characters betray each other?

 

Fidelity is shown throughout the novel by the various trusts built by the characters.  Although there is a huge amount of infidelity from Gillian, the rest of the characters, except Adam, seem to support each other and remain “faithful” to each other within the Leopardi Circle.  Adam is, in my opinion, a young man who has not yet found himself, and Gillian is, well, Gillian.  Virginia, Bernard and Chris are all reasonably faithful to the other group member, although Bernard has had issues in the past.  He seems to have had a change of “heart” when his son is born.  I think Nancy is the truest of the group.  She is the one who has the right idea about how to respect people, not just within the group, but in all aspects of her life.  She respects her daughter, her mother, her lover and the members of her writing circle. 

 

How does jealousy play a role in the novel, and for whom? Is there any jealousy that might be considered healthy?

 

Although we are not exposed to as much internal dialogue from Gillian as we are from Nancy, I think Gillian must be a deeply unhappy person.  I think she is jealous of the other members.  Although she doesn’t seem to notice other people, I think that her early experiences have left her with a certain amount of insecurity in her adult life.  I can’t really back this up with a passage from the text, it is just a hunch I have about her.  I don’t think it can be considered healthy for anyone to suffer from insecurities about their own worth, but it cannot be helped by anyone other than Gillian.

 

How do you re-evaluate the characters other than Gillian in these final chapters? Have new aspects of each (or any) of them been revealed to us?

 

I find that Adam and Chris have grown in my estimation.  Not because they choose to support Nancy, but because they made a conscious choice in what is right and wrong.

 

How do you see the ideas of justice and injustice here--are the issues always clear, or are we left with any ambiguity about events that outrage us in the novel?

 

I don’t feel that justice was served.  The penalty for plagiarism should have been harsher.  I suppose it there were enough differences for Gillian to have some amount of plausible deniability and if there is deniability, then plagiarism isn’t proven.  However, it would have been more satisfying if there had been a stiffer penalty dished out.  I realize that losing the chance at a Pulitzer prize would be devastating, but since most people can’t relate to being the recipient of a Pulitzer, it felt like a little less punishment than she deserved.

"Tact, my dear"..."is merely a ploy of the unimaginative." - Bernard in Corinne Demas' "The Writing Circle"
"My life is my own, and the opinions of others don't interest me..." — Carroll John Daly**
**This is not necessarily true, I just love the quote!**
Distinguished Correspondent
Bonnie_C
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎08-07-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I thought the strength of this book were the building of the characters.  I enjoyed getting to know each of them.  Some I pretty much had the same feelings for throughout the read.  I liked Virginia. Bernard was Bernard.  I started out disliking Gillian and I ended up really disliking Gillian.  Adam was just there throughout the story.  The two that I had the most change of feelings for were Nancy and Chris.

 

I started out not liking Chris.  It seemed he fancied himself a real lady's man.  But when I saw how devoted he was to his sons, I started to change my mind.  In his last chapter Chris finds out that his ex lied to his boys to make them turn against him.  He handled the situation by telling them that he and their mom had a misunderstanding and that he would never stand them up.  Instead of maligning their mom he did what was right for his sons.  What a guy!  He gained a lot of respect from me for that one.

 

On the other hand I grew weary of Nancy.  Her constant self doubts became annoying after a while.  She viewed her father as perfect and she was constantly trying to measure up.  But what did it for me was when she and Adam were driving to the university to do research.  Adam tells her that he broke up with Kim because he was in love with Gillian. Now Gillian does not want him.    What's the first thing that Nancy asks?  Would you like to go out with my daughter?  Talk about throwing your child under a bus! 

 

Bonnie

 

Contributor
kimerella40
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎05-03-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I feel like the whole book was about infidelity, and trust issues.  I found it ironic that Gillian came down so hard on Paul for his papers but she was that very person in the end. She also cheated every chance she got.  The writer starts to make it like Nancy would have something with Chris, then twists it away and leaves Nancy on moral ground.   I also found myself wanting more throughout the whole book.  More details, more scenes, I feel like there was so much left out...some would say each reader can then make it what they want it to be, however, for me, I wanted the detail, I wanted to keep reading to find the detail and I was left sort of empty. 

Inspired Wordsmith
krb2g
Posts: 289
Registered: ‎02-05-2008

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

One of the ways I'm most interested in the infidelity/plagiarism question is in its communitarian/legal ramifications. While some forms of plagiarism are also copyright infringement, plagiarism itself isn't generally a criminal offense (although offended parties may certainly sue in the civil courts and may be awarded damages). Plagiarism, then, is often a problem arbitrated by communities (like the Leopardi Circle, the board that awards the Pulitzer prize, or a school's administration or honor committee). This arbitration may vary wildly. I attended a college where people convicted of plagiarism are expelled on their first offense, but I know that not every college is like that. Nancy worries that she's lost her moral center when she goes after Gillian (and, admittedly, she does track down an unrelated case to present to the Pulitzer folks when she realizes that there's not quite enough hard evidence about her own novel), but I tend to think the problem is more that we don't have standardized ways of dealing with plagiarism in our own society, so any individual action feels a bit like vigilantism.  

Author
Corinne-Demas
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎04-07-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

What an interesting point!

 

--Corinne

 

krb2g wrote:

One of the ways I'm most interested in the infidelity/plagiarism question is in its communitarian/legal ramifications. While some forms of plagiarism are also copyright infringement, plagiarism itself isn't generally a criminal offense (although offended parties may certainly sue in the civil courts and may be awarded damages). Plagiarism, then, is often a problem arbitrated by communities (like the Leopardi Circle, the board that awards the Pulitzer prize, or a school's administration or honor committee). This arbitration may vary wildly. I attended a college where people convicted of plagiarism are expelled on their first offense, but I know that not every college is like that. Nancy worries that she's lost her moral center when she goes after Gillian (and, admittedly, she does track down an unrelated case to present to the Pulitzer folks when she realizes that there's not quite enough hard evidence about her own novel), but I tend to think the problem is more that we don't have standardized ways of dealing with plagiarism in our own society, so any individual action feels a bit like vigilantism.  

 

 

Contributor
brndygrl98
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎05-03-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

How is fidelity a major subject of the novel, in terms of all the kinds of relationships presented--in love relationships, in friendships, and among peers? What are some of the ways characters are faithful, and in what ways do characters betray each other?

 

The characters all seem to be faithful to their novels and some are faithful to their loved ones. There are others, not so much.

 

How does jealousy play a role in the novel, and for whom? Is there any jealousy that might be considered healthy?

 

I think that secretly, the other writers are all jealous of Gillian for having the guts to "borrow" Nancy's work and turn it into her own. They may not approve of it, but I think deep down they all think it's cleaver.

 

How do you re-evaluate the characters other than Gillian in these final chapters? Have new aspects of each (or any) of them been revealed to us?

 

I was very disappointed in Nancy. I feel like she had no courage whatsoever. She needed to stand up for her work and right the situation and not feel bad about doing it. I hated that she was like a doormat.

 

How do you see the ideas of justice and injustice here--are the issues always clear, or are we left with any ambiguity about events that outrage us in the novel?

 

I have to say that the entire ending chapters of this novel outraged me. After all that we go through with the lives of these authors, Nancy seems to pansy out on us, you never know what happens with Chris and his ex-wife/children and poor Paul! In fact, we don't find out what really happens to any of the characters. It was a very weak ending.

Distinguished Correspondent
chris227
Posts: 111
Registered: ‎12-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

Fidelity and jealousy were huge themes in this novel. 

 

There was speculation of many of the characters having affairs while married, Bernard in particular.  Aimee was very concerned and did not trust Bernard.  Gillian cheats on her husband with Adam who is cheating on his girlfriend.  Chris, it appears, has lost trust in women after his relationships of the past. 

 

Both Paul and Gillian are accused of plagiarism.  In Paul's case it is a matter of trying to complete an assignment and Gillian makes sure that Paul knows how upsetting it is to her, as a writer, that he stole someone else's work.  The end of the novel however shows that Gillian has stole a piece of Nancy's writing and used it for her own piece, something she has done in the past. 

 

It seems everyone within the writing circle is jealous of another's success. 

 

I have ambivalent feelings towards Gillian.  I really don't want to like her but I feel kind of sorry for her as well.  I don't think she saw her plagiarism as stealing because she took a piece and made it her own but she did steal part of the work.  As for her thesis I may say that that was accidental/  She had heard it once and later it came back to her as she was writing.  With Nancy however, even though she took her own path with the story she did take nancy's beginning.  I am not sure what to think about Gillian.

 

I agree with others that this book leaves many unanswered questions: What happens with Chris and his boys?  Does Nancy's book get published?  Will Adam ever finish his book?  How do Rachel and Paul's father (his name slips my mind) cope with Paul's death?  It just seems there were so many open story lines with all of the different characters that the book was left almost unfinished.

Distinguished Correspondent
Bonnie_C
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎08-07-2009
0 Kudos

Re: The Writing Circle: Final Chapters and Whole Novel

I have to say that I too was disappointed in the ending.  I wish there were a few more pages to give a little more closure to the story.  An epilog that shows all the writers gathered around a grave would signify that Paul had indeed died.  Or a scene where a potential new member is being introduced to the circle would signify that the group itself is not dead.

 

If you really wanted to go over the top, have the group meet for their readings.  Then someone (perhaps Nancy) start out by reading a selection from their new novel.  Then this person begins  reading a chapter that starts out with "The house is set on a hillside, with a long driveway that leads up to it and disappears around the back." 

 

Bonnie