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Rachel-K
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The Writing Circle: The Circle

 

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?
How do the group members relate to each other? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?
In these early chapters, what relationships can we see taking shape? What background relationships do we get to know, and which relationships are still left in the shadows for us?
We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others?
What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?
Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work they do as a writer? Are the genres and styles they write in a part of their personalities here?

 

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?


How do the group members relate to each other? Do some seem to dominate? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?

 

In these early chapters, what relationships can we see taking shape? What background relationships do we get to know, and which relationships are still left in the shadows for us?
We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others?

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work he or she does as a writer? Are their writing styles a part of their personalities here?

 

By the way, if anyone is curious about the group's namesake, here's a wiki link: 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giacomo_Leopardi

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violetangel
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

[ Edited ]

I pretty much covered this before, but I haven't found anything strong or sympathetic about any of the characters.  There is very little background given, which, imho, only adds to the stock feel of each of them.

 

Gillian is so stock - earth-type pretentious poet who likes her solitude - it's not even funny.

 

Chris is the hot-shot best-seller who thinks he's all that.  Yawn.

 

Adam is the little ingenue with the ever-so-slight twist that he's male rather than female as an ingenue usually is.

 

Bernard is your classic womanizer who tries to make all the women in his life happy.

 

Blah, blah, blah.  I barely even remember the others they're so forgettable and stock.

 

I cam closest to having some sympathy for Nancy in the beginning - being new and coming into a group where they all know each other - but then her whole attitude of "Oh, well, they're discussing me so I won't join even if they accept me" to be whiny and pretentious.

 

These guys have a long way to go to even remotely win me over, and inho, that's going to be a significant weakness of the book.  In fact, I'm only still reading it because I committed to doing this club.  If I'd picked it up on my own, I would have put it down long before page 88.  If I don't care about any of the characters in a book by the end of the third chapter, I don't keep reading.  Life is too short and there are too many other books I actually want to read.  I'm going to keep going because of this commitment, but this start of basically introducing stock characters with very little background or reason for being why they are how they are presented is definitely going to affect how I read the rest of the story.

‎"No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anyone but oneself." -Virginia Woolf
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Sunltcloud
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

Giacomo Taldegardo Francesco di Sales SaverioPietro Leopardi (1798-1837) "one of the greatest poets of modern Italy" (Wikipedia) was, in my eyes, a rather pessimistic man.

 

"(In Zibaldone") Leopardi compares the innocent and happy state of nature with the condition of modern man, corrupted by an excessively developed faculty of reason which, rejecting the necessary illusions of myth and religion in favor of a dark reality of annihilation and emptiness, can only generate unhappiness."

 

I read this quite early, before I finished the reading assignment, and decided that "The Circle" named after Leopardi by Helene, the founder of the group, is recreating his observations and attitude toward intelligent man. In an environment that is supposed to foster inclinations toward poetry and prose, promote literary ambitions, and provide the security blanket a blossoming author - or even a seasoned one - seeks, a climate of annihilation prevails.

 

Of necessity the Circle needs a backdrop of personal information, but I found the material too extensive, too personal so early on in the story. I found myself almost feeling embarrassed by the revelations characters made about each other. I didn't, for instance, want to know that Bernard has bad breath in the morning nor did I care to be informed about his sexual lethargy. I certainly wasn't interested in the names of Christopher's wives and lovers or the comparison of Julie and Other Julie. For the sake of remembering forshadowing components I wrote down all the names I encountered, but I am not sure that all these relationships are important to the development of the novel. And so I became rather reluctant to wrap my mind around 26 bystanders and tried to concentrate on the six main players.

 

I have to admit that the concept of the writing group is interesting; distinct characters are emerging early on, and detailed revelation of outside relationships is often necessary to show the writers' trends, ambitions, and baggage. 

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Sunltcloud
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

For those who are interested. I think most of the names are on this list.

 

Nancy Markopolis: writes/edits a medical newsletter. She has blond hair, cut just below her ears. She is “Small and tidy” according to Gillian. And she has attached earlobes. She lives with Oates.

Nancy is working on a memoir of her father’s youth.

 

Aliki: Nancy's grown daughter.

 

 

Bernard: his past wife is Virginia (they were married for 20 years) and his present wife is Aimee. Aimee is small, slender, soft -spoken. Bernard is messy, inclined to clutter. House filled with old stuff but Aimee paints the wood white when she moves in. B. has pale eyes. Curly, once blond hair. Corpulent, puffy look.  Verbally passionate. Lethargic in bed. Pompous, slovenly, babyish, and “selectively unworldly.”

Bernard is working on a biography of George Frideric Handel )Georg Friederich Händel)

Prior biographies on John Donne and Hegel.

 

 

Rachel: Bernard and Virginia’s daughter. Aimee (second wife) is about her age.

 

 

Teddy: Bernard and Virginia’s son.

 

 

Virginia: is now married to Joe. She doesn’t drive. Failed twice at test when younger. Virginia and Joe found each other again after fifty years, after Bernard and Virginia separated. V. is portly with a grandmotherly manner.

 

 

Joe Sussman: married to Virginia. Studied history in graduate school but sells mattresses for family business. He has two sons; his wife died when boys were in college. He is retired. He is a cautious driver.

 

 

Aimee: dark hair, dark eyes. Small frame.

 

 

Adam Freytoch: he designs running shoes. Is very young. Adam is naïve and in love with his writing. Adam’s first novel weighed seven pounds. Helene was his mentor.

Adam is working on a novel about an American businessman and a Russian woman who might be a prostitute.

 

 

Kim(Kimberly): Adam’s girlfriend.

 

Christopher Billingsley: seeks approval. Writes thrillers. Tan, smooth shaven, women like his looks. He is a novelist (not a literary novelist according to Gillian) But he makes a living as writer. He was managing editor on the Yorktown Tribune. He has a sportscar. He was brought in the group by Virginia. He lived in the same house as her daughter Rachel. He was married twice.

 

 

Valerie: Chris’s first wife, his college girl friend, social worker at teenage facility.

 

Julie: Chris’s first intense relationship after Valerie. In the landscaping business.

 

 

Simone: Chris’s second intense relationship after Valerie. Reference librarian.

 

 

Susan Pratt: Chris’s third intense relationship after Valerie. Rising vice president in mortgage department of a bank. They marry and have two sons in three years.

 

 

Samuel and Benjamin: Chris’s sons from his marriage with Susan Pratt.

 

Lydia: Chris’s sister who lives in Boston. Accompanies him to his colonoscopy.

 

 

Julie: nurse at hospital where Chris has colonoscopy.

 

 

Other Julie: long frizzy blond hair, bandana. Chris had an affair with her a decade ago. Shaved arm pits for him but not her legs.

 

 

Dave: Chris’s lawyer.

 

 

Gillian Coit: she is a recognized poet. Her braided hair reaches below her waist. Adam is

in love with her. Gillian doesn’t want other poets in the group. Not lesser ones or better ones.

Gillian works on a six -part poem. She indulges in exclusivity according to Nancy.

 

 

Paul Traub: he is Gillian’s stepson.

 

 

Jennifer: is Paul’s sister.

 

 

Jerry: Paul’s dad. Gillian’s husband.

 

 

Mr. O’Connor: runs the ice arena where Paul practices. He was once a hockey player.

 

 

Helene Spivack. Died of lung cancer. Nancy is her replacement in the group.

 

 

Christa Worthington: murdered in her house in Truro

 

 

Pete Ambrose: handyman who checks Gillian’s house in Truro in winter. Married to Marie Ambrose.

 

Robert Oates Mullingford: Nancy’s live-in lover. Has grey hair which Nancy cuts.

 

 

Teresa Kleinholz: Nancy’s friend. She has little blue eyes, a pudgy face, and wears itchy sweaters and scarves that she knits, and differs in political opinion with her friend Nancy.

 

 

Kate Kleinholz: Teresa’s daughter. In high school.

 

 

Dick Smollett: once a member of the Leopardis. He nabbed a Ma Arthur (whatever that means.)

 

 

Giacomo Leopardi was pessimistic, tortured, passionate (as Helene pointed out) He is the Italian poet after whom Helene named the group.

 

Herb Miller: the Kleinholz’s neighbor who buries the horse

 

 

 

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maxcat
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

The Leopardi Circle has a diverse group of people in it.

Nancy- she is new to the group and a bit overwhelmed, it seems, by Gillian. Gillian seems to be a force to be reckoned with as she show aggression and I personally think that she is rude to everybody.

Bernard- he is a messy character. He was once married to Virginia, who is a member of the group. His writings are good according to the group.

Virginia- as mentioned, she is Bernard's ex- wife. She has never learned to drive  and her new husband, Joe drives her everywhere.

Chris- has published many books, usually about a retired journalist.

Adam- has never published anything and is working on a novel about an American businessman and a Russian woman. The writing is rather verbose. We find out later that Adam wanted to play the viola but it became a memory as her wanted to write. He graduated from college with an engineering degree but also took a creative writing course and found he was better at that. He mentored under Helene, who found the Leopardi Circle. He feels inadequate in the circle especially since Helene passed away.

nacy has a relationship with Oates; they've been living together for a while. He travels a lot and he asked her to marry him before his travelling, but she had not decided yet. When he came home this time, she said yes.

Bernard tells Nancy she was voted into the group but there was a dissenting vote. When Chris asked her to lunch, she asked if he was the negative vote.. He said yes but wanted to get acquainted with her by way of lunch.

I do get a sense of the type of writing that everyone does. Gillian sounds perfect for poetry. Nancy is writing about her Dad after he died. Chris has a number of books out about a retired journalist and continues to write about the series. Adam is vague and Virginia, I don't feel any type of writing for her.

Gillian- very bossy; writes poems.

There seems to be some interactivity with these writers. There are mini- plots and the group seems to get along with each other. As of now, the only rules I see are that the group meets every Sunday afternoon at someone's house. They take turns. Also, there are three readings done at these meetings.

Bernard and his new wife Aimee have an enjoyable relationship; she is contemporary in her decorating style and is very organized whereas Bernard is the messy and unorganized one.

Virginia and Joe have known  each other since elementary school. They met by accident and were married after she divorced Bernard.

Gillian and her husband Jerry get along, but she escapes to her cottage most often to write her poetry. Paul is Gillian's stepson and he has a hard time coping with her. For example, she was to pick him up from practice one night and he stood there in the parking lot alone and waiting for her. She finally picks him up but is late as usual. Jerry has a hard time coping with her writing schedule but he does want her to have quality time to write her poems.

Gillian goes to her cottage called Buttonfield and is alone with the marsh, sand and the sea.

There was one incident where Adam called Paul at home and asked for the cottage number as gillian had left a folder at the last meeting. He calls Gillian not that far away from the cottage and along with returning the folder they had dinner and he spent the night.

 

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Zia01
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

How do the group members relate to each other? Do some seem to dominate? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules? There are definitely dominate members of the group. I'm not really sure I'm certain how their rules work just yet. Does seem to be a pecking order.

 


We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others? She seems very uncertain at this point. I'm not convince she will fit well yet.

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch? He's sizing her up.

 

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

sorry, i put the laurels in the post before this and i don't know how to change it. this really helped me, i read it a few weeks ago and your review of the characters brought much of it back to my memory.

thanks again.

Sunltcloud wrote:

For those who are interested. I think most of the names are on this list.

 

Nancy Markopolis: writes/edits a medical newsletter. She has blond hair, cut just below her ears. She is “Small and tidy” according to Gillian. And she has attached earlobes. She lives with Oates.

Nancy is working on a memoir of her father’s youth.

 

Aliki: Nancy's grown daughter.

 

 

Bernard: his past wife is Virginia (they were married for 20 years) and his present wife is Aimee. Aimee is small, slender, soft -spoken. Bernard is messy, inclined to clutter. House filled with old stuff but Aimee paints the wood white when she moves in. B. has pale eyes. Curly, once blond hair. Corpulent, puffy look.  Verbally passionate. Lethargic in bed. Pompous, slovenly, babyish, and “selectively unworldly.”

Bernard is working on a biography of George Frideric Handel )Georg Friederich Händel)

Prior biographies on John Donne and Hegel.

 

 

Rachel: Bernard and Virginia’s daughter. Aimee (second wife) is about her age.

 

 

Teddy: Bernard and Virginia’s son.

 

 

Virginia: is now married to Joe. She doesn’t drive. Failed twice at test when younger. Virginia and Joe found each other again after fifty years, after Bernard and Virginia separated. V. is portly with a grandmotherly manner.

 

 

Joe Sussman: married to Virginia. Studied history in graduate school but sells mattresses for family business. He has two sons; his wife died when boys were in college. He is retired. He is a cautious driver.

 

 

Aimee: dark hair, dark eyes. Small frame.

 

 

Adam Freytoch: he designs running shoes. Is very young. Adam is naïve and in love with his writing. Adam’s first novel weighed seven pounds. Helene was his mentor.

Adam is working on a novel about an American businessman and a Russian woman who might be a prostitute.

 

 

Kim(Kimberly): Adam’s girlfriend.

 

Christopher Billingsley: seeks approval. Writes thrillers. Tan, smooth shaven, women like his looks. He is a novelist (not a literary novelist according to Gillian) But he makes a living as writer. He was managing editor on the Yorktown Tribune. He has a sportscar. He was brought in the group by Virginia. He lived in the same house as her daughter Rachel. He was married twice.

 

 

Valerie: Chris’s first wife, his college girl friend, social worker at teenage facility.

 

Julie: Chris’s first intense relationship after Valerie. In the landscaping business.

 

 

Simone: Chris’s second intense relationship after Valerie. Reference librarian.

 

 

Susan Pratt: Chris’s third intense relationship after Valerie. Rising vice president in mortgage department of a bank. They marry and have two sons in three years.

 

 

Samuel and Benjamin: Chris’s sons from his marriage with Susan Pratt.

 

Lydia: Chris’s sister who lives in Boston. Accompanies him to his colonoscopy.

 

 

Julie: nurse at hospital where Chris has colonoscopy.

 

 

Other Julie: long frizzy blond hair, bandana. Chris had an affair with her a decade ago. Shaved arm pits for him but not her legs.

 

 

Dave: Chris’s lawyer.

 

 

Gillian Coit: she is a recognized poet. Her braided hair reaches below her waist. Adam is

in love with her. Gillian doesn’t want other poets in the group. Not lesser ones or better ones.

Gillian works on a six -part poem. She indulges in exclusivity according to Nancy.

 

 

Paul Traub: he is Gillian’s stepson.

 

 

Jennifer: is Paul’s sister.

 

 

Jerry: Paul’s dad. Gillian’s husband.

 

 

Mr. O’Connor: runs the ice arena where Paul practices. He was once a hockey player.

 

 

Helene Spivack. Died of lung cancer. Nancy is her replacement in the group.

 

 

Christa Worthington: murdered in her house in Truro

 

 

Pete Ambrose: handyman who checks Gillian’s house in Truro in winter. Married to Marie Ambrose.

 

Robert Oates Mullingford: Nancy’s live-in lover. Has grey hair which Nancy cuts.

 

 

Teresa Kleinholz: Nancy’s friend. She has little blue eyes, a pudgy face, and wears itchy sweaters and scarves that she knits, and differs in political opinion with her friend Nancy.

 

 

Kate Kleinholz: Teresa’s daughter. In high school.

 

 

Dick Smollett: once a member of the Leopardis. He nabbed a Ma Arthur (whatever that means.)

 

 

Giacomo Leopardi was pessimistic, tortured, passionate (as Helene pointed out) He is the Italian poet after whom Helene named the group.

 

Herb Miller: the Kleinholz’s neighbor who buries the horse

 

 

 

 

 

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GuzziAlfa
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

That's a lot of discussion points to get into.  For brevity, I'll post to just one to allow for ease of reading - the circle itself.  I've known or imagined I've known writing circles.  Peripherally anyhow - I've worked with the players I imagined being a part of a writing circle that included, poets, playwrights, biographers and even book store owners and even a photographer.  They all met socially and I believe they supported each others work.  As a computer consultant, one referral begat another until I knew each of them  - and their circle. 

 

This circle was as much a convenience of locale as it was a tight, closed knit, members only group.  As the voting in of Nancy shows, not just anyone could gain access to the circle.  At the same time, I do not believe that they would be in a circle together if it weren't for the fact that they were all relatively close and that makes it the artists colony of geographic separation.  This group wouldn't have existed is this form if it were on say Cape Ann or Manhattan.  Being more rural, I find it more like the Litchfield County artists group - weekend purveys of convenience but also of mutual respect if not disrespect and mistrust.  That will make this group explode eventually - not just for the who is sleeping with has slept with and will sleep with's to come but also in the styles and differences.  It's a ticking time bomb that makes me want to read more.  Hard starting to read but once the characters developed and I see some of the similarities to the artists I've known over the years - it's a writers circle soap opera of grand elegance, elocution and deviants/deviances.

 

That's my take on the circle so far.

 

John S.

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krb2g
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

What did you all make of Nancy's first day in the writing circle? I thought Bernard wasn't very kind in not telling Nancy that it was going to be a test run, even though I think either he did it subconciously/inadvertantly, or to get her so far in that she couldn't say no (she reflects that she wouldn't have come if she knew it was a trial run) until the group had a chance to have a say.

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violetangel
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

 

krb2g wrote:

What did you all make of Nancy's first day in the writing circle? I thought Bernard wasn't very kind in not telling Nancy that it was going to be a test run, even though I think either he did it subconciously/inadvertantly, or to get her so far in that she couldn't say no (she reflects that she wouldn't have come if she knew it was a trial run) until the group had a chance to have a say.

 

I think anyone who's even been around any kind of a group like that would know that the first visit would be a trial on all parts.  For Nancy to seem so shocked that it was going on - and to have been presumptious enough to have brought her own sample - while knowing enough to know what was going on when she left really undermined the author's credibility about knowing how these kind of groups work imho.

 

‎"No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anyone but oneself." -Virginia Woolf
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darthlaurie
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

I think VioletAngel nailed it on the head for me. I don't particularly care about any of the characters with the possible exception of Paul. I want to like the other characters, but maybe they're too self-absorbed or undeveloped in the way they need to be developed (and no, I don't know how to fix that...sometimes characters spring from the author's head fully developed and alive and other times they're never fully realized).

Maybe part of the problem is the voice. The perspective changes, but the voice seems to be the same all the time and some of the characters become hopelessly muddled together.

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violetangel
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

Excellent point with the voice darthlaurie!  I typically don't mind a story that switches points-of-view, but now that you've mentioned voice, I realize that in the multiple pov stories I've read and enjoyed, each section is in first person from the designated character's perspective.  The fact that there is seemingly one voice narrating this makes it more difficult.  I think it might have worked better had Demas allowed each character to tell his/her own story.  Would I have liked it better?  I'm not sure.  But it would have made the characters easier to follow.

‎"No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anyone but oneself." -Virginia Woolf
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See_Jane_Read
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

violetangel wrote:

Excellent point with the voice darthlaurie!  I typically don't mind a story that switches points-of-view, but now that you've mentioned voice, I realize that in the multiple pov stories I've read and enjoyed, each section is in first person from the designated character's perspective.  The fact that there is seemingly one voice narrating this makes it more difficult.  I think it might have worked better had Demas allowed each character to tell his/her own story.  Would I have liked it better?  I'm not sure.  But it would have made the characters easier to follow.

 

Good point!  I also noticed that even though each chapter features a different character, it's still in the voice of the narrator and not the character.  I think that's why I feel like I don't really KNOW these characters, we're only privy to what information the narrator wants us to know about each character.  And though it may contribute to the reader feeling detatched from the characters, it may also serve the purpose of giving the reader just enough info about a character that you want to know more and get all those "why are they like that?" questions answered (at least I did anyway).

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RebaJane
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?

 

It appears that the original group came together through the deceased member, Helene.  However, there were already existing relationships -- Bernard and Virginia were married; Bernard and Gillian were lovers.  The members of the group are almost like a family -- Bernard and Virginia are the patriarch and matriarch and the other members are competitive siblings, with Gillian being the wicked stepsister.


How do the group members relate to each other? Do some seem to dominate? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?

 

The group members seem to be supportive of each other but this also appears to be a facade on the part of some.  I think Virginia is truly trying to be helpful; Nancy is also but is reluctant to share; Gillian criticizes under the guise of being helpful; Adam wants to be a part of the group but doesn't really want to change anything, which is probably a result of his youth and inexperience; Bernard just wants to feel important and I think Chris is just looking for someplace to fit in.  Virginia seems to be the moderator of the group and the one to keep everyone on track.  The rules that I thought were clear were the fact that everyone would read and everyone would comment and to be respectful (although this one is not always followed).

 

In these early chapters, what relationships can we see taking shape? What background relationships do we get to know, and which relationships are still left in the shadows for us?

 

We get a pretty good feel for the relationships that Bernard has with his current and former wives.  We have an idea of something at some point between Bernard and Gillian, but I don't think it is fully developed.  We see Gillian's relationships with her stepson and Adam, but her relationship with her husband is still a little gray.  Nancy's relationship with her daughter and her partner are there but not fully developed or understood.


We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others?

 

I think in some ways, Nancy is too closed to fit in.  She clearly likes Bernard and Virginia, but she doesn't know the others and isn't sure which steps she should take next.

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

I truly think Chris' motivation for inviting Nancy to lunch is loneliness.  He needs a friend and he has always turned to women for friendship (and more) and he's searching again for someone to make the loneliness go away and he thinks that person could be Nancy.

 

Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work he or she does as a writer? Are their writing styles a part of their personalities here?

 

Yes, I believe the characters' personalities show in their writing styles.  It's easier for Bernard to write about the lives of others than to look inside himself to find characters and a story.  Virginia is very down-to-earth and her writing style is reflective of that.  Nancy is searching for answers and her novel is providing those answers to her, whether her assumptions are correct or not.  Adam is living vicariously through the main character in his book and Chris' main character is a man who doesn't seem to need anyone but keeps himself busy to not have to examine that too closely.

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skrupp
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

There is a lot to talk about here, and others have done a great job discussing the members of the group. 

I have to say that at this point Paul is my favorite character so far.  He seems to be trying to have a relationship with his father and is even willing to try to have a relationship with Gillian.  Although the only relationship Gillian appears willing to have is one with herself.  While we may find out some dark secret that makes her the way she is, Gillian comes across as self-absorbed and very selfish.  I was disappointed to see that she was willing to sleep with Adam just because he "saved" her from a dead mouse.  Even though moments before he showed up she had been hoping to hear from her husband.

I think Chris is trying to figure out who Nancy is, since he was the dissenting vote initially.  He may also have been trying to play nice in case she hadn't heard that he didn't want her in the group or maybe because he figured she had heard that he had voted against her joining.

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LarryOnLI
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others?

 

I think Nancy's insecurities will give her problems fitting into the group.

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

Chris obviously suspects that Bernard revealed that he was against Nancy being invited to join the group and he wanted to take the opportunity to get "on her good side" since he likes to please women.

 

Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work he or she does as a writer? Are their writing styles a part of their personalities here?

 

I certainly get the sense that there is a hierarchy whose place is determined by primarily the style of the author and secondarily the commercial success of the author. I find it odd that Chris who writes commercially successful serial thrillers is looked down on as being less literary than the novelists, biographers, and of course poets. Isn't a thriller a novel?

 

 

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dhaupt
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

[ Edited ]

I will have to refrain from the first question Rachel because at this point I don't really know the how's and why's of the group.

 

I love the relationship between Virginia and Bernard being exes and their history is very interesting.

The more I learn about Gillian the more I dislike her.

And I want to learn more about Chris

 

 

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darthlaurie
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Registered: ‎04-02-2010
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

A couple of the posts mention the Leopardis as  being a close-knit circle, but I'm not so sure that they're all that close-knit. For the most part these people don't seem to be that emotionally involved in each other's lives. For instance, I get the impression that the various people feel obliged to invite the other members to get togethers-- Christmas parties, weddings, etc., not that they really truly want them there. When Chris spends the night in jail it's only mentioned-- almost as an aside. I know that with my close knit dance troupe if something like that happened to one of us it would be more than just an aside in the conversation. So...are they really close-knit or are they just exclusive?

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

It does seem to me that being invited is the first step,being accepted,then of course do you want to be part of The Leopardi Circle..I wonder how many other members dropped out..With so many egos bumping into each other along with insecurities,,Its very hard to form any concrete answers for me..Then we learn that sleeping around with other members does always change the whole dynamic....It must..The first 88 pages just touches on all The Players...I am keeping an open mind... There are no Traditional relationships in the group..That is what I like so far about the book....

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

I agree, keep an open mind. I am not sure what to make of everything yet. I have learned a little about them. Is the author showing us that Gillian has a pattern of sleeping with members of the circle, or is it just this time?  I would like to know how many dropped out. It would be intimidating in that group. So much to find out during the next sections. pen21

 

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

It does seem to me that being invited is the first step,being accepted,then of course do you want to be part of The Leopardi Circle..I wonder how many other members dropped out..With so many egos bumping into each other along with insecurities,,Its very hard to form any concrete answers for me..Then we learn that sleeping around with other members does always change the whole dynamic....It must..The first 88 pages just touches on all The Players...I am keeping an open mind... There are no Traditional relationships in the group..That is what I like so far about the book....