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cynthiaoh
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

I am not sure how much I will add to the points already made, but:

 

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?


How do the group members relate to each other? Do some seem to dominate? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?

 

Personally, I do not think the se character relate to one another at all -- they all seem to be hyper-critical of each other's work, but not in a truly constructive manner, but in a manner that feeds their personal agenda and ego.  The rules of the group seem to be created as they go and as long as there is not  a lot of push back from others in the group.

 

In these early chapters, what relationships can we see taking shape? What background relationships do we get to know, and which relationships are still left in the shadows for us?

 

I don't feel as if there is much background given -- we sort of pick up in the middle of something with each character, but without enough background to truly understand why we pick up in the particular point we do.  There is a lot left in the shadows to uncover, and my hope is that uncovering these details will tie into Nancy's story (the preface)

 

We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others?

 

From the outside, she would appear to be a perfect match to the group based on credentials and writing subject matter.  However, given the strong personalilty mix of the others, she will struggle with one or two purely on personality and not the content of her work.

 

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

To see what he can get out of her -- both from a relationship standpoint as well as an ally in the group.

 

Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work he or she does as a writer? Are their writing styles a part of their personalities here?

 

It is hard for me to comment on this right now as I do not feel I have built enough of a relationship with each character yet to understand how their writing style would match to their personality.

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

I could be way off here, but I will try to give my feelings on writing groups.

 

The writing group is not as close-knit as some other "social" groups or groups with special interests, probably because writers are often loners. A writer spends a great deal of time sorting out his/her thoughts, organizing them, editing them, expanding them. Doing research.

 

Writers are often insecure; there is no instant gratification (other than feeling that you have written an excellent paragraph) they have to wait months to find out if they have created a masterpiece or if they have fallen short.

 

Writers often feel vulnerable; questioning their own motives for writing a particular piece. They wonder if there is too much autobiography in a novel. They are afraid of exposing somebody, that somebody will recognize himself in a negative light in a piece of fiction. Or, maybe, if they are writing non-fiction, they hope to expose somebody, but are not sure of the consequences.

 

Writers are, like others, often reluctant to give up their secrets. But while a knitting group, for instance, might make one of the knitters comfortable enough to expose her past, in a writing group shared secrets could end up as subplots.

 

Of course there is the competition.  Various genres have their followers. Trends develop. And while grading the success of individual writers is done in money terms, comparing them to each other, as far as their fields are concerned, is like comparing apples and oranges.

 

And, as in any group, there are people who are drawn to each other and people who can't stand each other.  One writer might have a close relationship with another (maybe one who writes in a different genre) they might share lunch and concerns outside the group or invite each other into family situations. Then there are the two poets: one works on a line for hours, carefully constructing sounds and smells and touches into an understated continuum of natural beauty; the other poet screeches painful confusion onto a napkin at a local coffee shop. Number one calls number two abusive in form and content while number two sighs and mumbles a swear word when number one opens her writing pad to share the final (exquisite) line of a poem about the intricacies of a dandelion. On top of that, one watches MSNBC while the other explores youtube videos. The only thing they can agree on is the lack of the host's taste in coffee beans. But when the host is late (he is being bailed out of jail by his exwife) they fight over the coffee selection: French roast vs. Kona coffee. 

 

I say, "Let's have tea today!"

 

 

darthlaurie wrote:

A couple of the posts mention the Leopardis as  being a close-knit circle, but I'm not so sure that they're all that close-knit. For the most part these people don't seem to be that emotionally involved in each other's lives. For instance, I get the impression that the various people feel obliged to invite the other members to get togethers-- Christmas parties, weddings, etc., not that they really truly want them there. When Chris spends the night in jail it's only mentioned-- almost as an aside. I know that with my close knit dance troupe if something like that happened to one of us it would be more than just an aside in the conversation. So...are they really close-knit or are they just exclusive?

 

 

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Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

cynthiaoh wrote:

I am not sure how much I will add to the points already made, but:

 

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?


How do the group members relate to each other? Do some seem to dominate? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?

 

Personally, I do not think the se character relate to one another at all -- they all seem to be hyper-critical of each other's work, but not in a truly constructive manner, but in a manner that feeds their personal agenda and ego.  The rules of the group seem to be created as they go and as long as there is not  a lot of push back from others in the group.

 

In these early chapters, what relationships can we see taking shape? What background relationships do we get to know, and which relationships are still left in the shadows for us?

 

I don't feel as if there is much background given -- we sort of pick up in the middle of something with each character, but without enough background to truly understand why we pick up in the particular point we do.  There is a lot left in the shadows to uncover, and my hope is that uncovering these details will tie into Nancy's story (the preface)

 

We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others?

 

From the outside, she would appear to be a perfect match to the group based on credentials and writing subject matter.  However, given the strong personalilty mix of the others, she will struggle with one or two purely on personality and not the content of her work.

 

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

To see what he can get out of her -- both from a relationship standpoint as well as an ally in the group.

 

Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work he or she does as a writer? Are their writing styles a part of their personalities here?

 

It is hard for me to comment on this right now as I do not feel I have built enough of a relationship with each character yet to understand how their writing style would match to their personality.

 cynthiaoh..We all have something to add.even it s been said before,its always different in anothers voice.I also feel my relationship with each character has not been developed yet in my head.So I am never quick to judge..Keeping an open mind is the only way with TWC for me.Things are never what  they seem...Ethics are arbitrary..Never written in stone with this "Leopardi Circle "writing group..It should be an interesting month...Susan Vtc

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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LenaH
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

The group, to me, seems like an odd mixture of people. While they all have writing in common, they don't appear to have much else in common. Bernard appears to be an aging playboy, Virginia seems much more content with her life away from Bernard, although struggling as an empty nester. Gillian is the Cruella DeVille of the group, and I just felt plain sorry for Chris and Adam, just for different reasons. The two of them seem to drift into the background of the group because of their personal dramas outside the group. I think Nancy takes the group more to 'heart' than the other members, but that could be only be because she was new and not sufficiently jaded by their antics.

I don't think Nancy really fits...she seems more 'true' than the others. She also seems more nurturing of her work.  I got the impression the others would just throw things out with less heart than she did.

Chris invited Nancy to lunch to get a feel for her as a 'friend' or a 'foe'. Or maybe it was nothing more than him sniffing her out as a new dating prospect.

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

 

pen21 wrote:

I agree, keep an open mind. I am not sure what to make of everything yet. I have learned a little about them. Is the author showing us that Gillian has a pattern of sleeping with members of the circle, or is it just this time?  I would like to know how many dropped out. It would be intimidating in that group. So much to find out during the next sections. pen21

 

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

It does seem to me that being invited is the first step,being accepted,then of course do you want to be part of The Leopardi Circle..I wonder how many other members dropped out..With so many egos bumping into each other along with insecurities,,Its very hard to form any concrete answers for me..Then we learn that sleeping around with other members does always change the whole dynamic....It must..The first 88 pages just touches on all The Players...I am keeping an open mind... There are no Traditional relationships in the group..That is what I like so far about the book....

 

 

 

pen...Definately intimidating..Its so soon,that patterns have not been established..I want to move on.its so tempting,but I always try to keep on schedule..Not always successful though...

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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MSaff
Posts: 272
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

Good Evening Everyone,

 

  I think that this group is an interesting group.  How they ever came together is beyond my comprehension at this time.  As it was described, the core group votes on admission to the group once a candidate has been suggested or what I believe nominated.  This was they can attempt to keep control and in some ways show at elitist attitude.  I may be wrong here, but that is my take on the group as I see it now.

 

I think we've already seen some budding love interest or maybe just lust and jumping into and out of beds.  There is also some undercurrents between some of the members, but with each reading parts of their manuscripts I think that there is also a lot of fear that their work is not good enough to be published. 

  As we've seen so far, there is a mix of people in this group, some published and others not yet published. 

 

  Now I'm going to touch on Chris and Nancy.  I think the motivation for Chris to go to lunch with Nancy, stems from the fact that Chris was not so sure of Nancy and he could have been the vote against her being admitted into the group initially.  He trying to feel his way around her and get a feeling away from the group.  Whether he feels threatened by Nancy or not, I'm not sure, I guess we'll have to wait and see how thing pan out.

 

  I want to read on to see how well each character fits with how they write.  It should be interesting. 

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?
How do the group members relate to each other? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?
In these early chapters, what relationships can we see taking shape? What background relationships do we get to know, and which relationships are still left in the shadows for us?
We watch Nancy come into the group for the first time. How do you think she fits in with the others?
What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?
Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work they do as a writer? Are the genres and styles they write in a part of their personalities here?

 

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?


How do the group members relate to each other? Do some seem to dominate? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?

 

 

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

 

By the way, if anyone is curious about the group's namesake, here's a wiki link: 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giacomo_Leopardi

 

 

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
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mediamissy
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎08-06-2009
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?

 

Each member of the group adds an interesting twist to the mix.  Unlike some, I find them quite fascinating really.  In picturing a writing circle I would imagine to see a hot shot, a modest novelist, a strong willed poet and a gathering of people who in the norm wouldn't be found together.  The characterization almost reminds me of a literary breakfast club type grouping.  I am excited to see how their lives may intertwine because they are so different.  


How do the group members relate to each other? Do some seem to dominate? How does this writing group function--do we get a sense of the rules?
 

 

 I get the sense that rules are meant to be broken in this group.  I find that the group members tend to be critical both professionally and personally.  Gillian seems to dominate but it almost seems as if they allow her to dominate but I cannot figure out why they make that concession yet.  It seems the group is there to share and critique but also to share there thoughts and life with each other.  

 

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 I get the feeling that Chris' motivation was to feel out where Nancy may fall within the group.  Although his warning about Gillian was warranted I felt as if maybe he was looking to see how she reacted than truly wanting to warn her. 

 

 

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Cyscokitty
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

The one thing I have found disjointed is the writing style compared to personality. However, even as I type this, I'm not sure I would expect most writers to have a personality that would fit neatly with their writing style. I have a friend who has published two books - one is a piece of pure fluff and one is a heavily researched historical novel. Neither really fit her personality.

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Deanne75
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎05-04-2010

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?

 

Nancy strikes me as someone who is very hesitant to change.  She has become very comfortable writing her medical newsletter articles and seems really insecure about her novel.  She has recently been faced with the change of her daughter leaving home, even writing an article about "emply nest syndrome" just for fun even though it will not be published in the newsletter.

 

Bernard is just odd.  He's an older man, married to a younger woman.  I don't really get the dynamic between him and Aimee.  It seems to me like he's trying to hang on to his youth rather than embracing his maturity.  He completely changes his demeanor when around Aimee.  He becomes submissive and allows her to make him feel guilty for being a part of the Leopardis.  Whereas, when he is with the other members of the circle, he becomes somewhat pompous and self absorbed.  Of all the members of the circle, I think he allows his membership in it to define him the most.

 

Chris is just as two sided as Bernard is. He seems both the fast-talking, fast-driving, free-wheeling, "I'm a hotshot novelist", and also devoted father and lonely divorced guy wronged by a manipulative ex-wife.

 

Adam is a little puppy dog that looks up to the other members of the group and is desperate for acceptance and approval.

 

Virginia has stepped into the matriarch role of the group after Helene's passing.  She is the one member of the group who seems genuine in their participation in the group...meaning she's not just there to feed her ego.

 

Gillian - Wow.  She is a piece of work.  She IS an accomplished and talented poet.  She seems to think herself above the other members of the group.  She is manipulative and just all around not a very nice person.

 

Although deceased, I think Helene warrants a mention as a member of the circle.  The group seems to be floundering a bit after her passing and trying to decide what it wants to be when it grows up, so to speak.

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

I think Chris' motivaion for inviting Nancy to lunch is mostly to feel out her opinions of the other members of the circle.  I think he wants to know if she is "friend or foe".  I also think the "I'm a hotshot novelist" side of him wanted to feel her out romantically.

 

Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work he or she does as a writer? Are their writing styles a part of their personalities here?

 

I would agree that to some extent their writing styles are a part of their personalities.  Gillian sees herself as aloof and intellegent which is exhibited in her poetry.  Adam seems to equate substance with quality which is evident in his pride that his first novel weighed 7 pounds.  His characters seem to reflect the type of person he wants to be.  The main character of Chris's novels seems to reflect some of his personality as well.

 

 

Deanne
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Rachel-K
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

 

Deanne75 wrote:


 

Bernard is just odd.  He's an older man, married to a younger woman.  I don't really get the dynamic between him and Aimee.  It seems to me like he's trying to hang on to his youth rather than embracing his maturity.  He completely changes his demeanor when around Aimee.  He becomes submissive and allows her to make him feel guilty for being a part of the Leopardis.  Whereas, when he is with the other members of the circle, he becomes somewhat pompous and self absorbed.  Of all the members of the circle, I think he allows his membership in it to define him the most.

 

 

 

 

What an interesting take on Bernard! I hadn't thought of how each in the group might see themselves reflected by their membership in the group. 

 

 

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Rachel-K
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

 

Sunltcloud wrote:

For those who are interested. I think most of the names are on this list.

 

Nancy Markopolis: writes/edits a medical newsletter. She has blond hair, cut just below her ears. She is “Small and tidy” according to Gillian. And she has attached earlobes. She lives with Oates.

Nancy is working on a memoir of her father’s youth.

 

Aliki: Nancy's grown daughter.

 

 

Bernard: his past wife is Virginia (they were married for 20 years) and his present wife is Aimee. Aimee is small, slender, soft -spoken. Bernard is messy, inclined to clutter. House filled with old stuff but Aimee paints the wood white when she moves in. B. has pale eyes. Curly, once blond hair. Corpulent, puffy look.  Verbally passionate. Lethargic in bed. Pompous, slovenly, babyish, and “selectively unworldly.”

Bernard is working on a biography of George Frideric Handel )Georg Friederich Händel)

Prior biographies on John Donne and Hegel.

 

 

Rachel: Bernard and Virginia’s daughter. Aimee (second wife) is about her age.

 

 

Teddy: Bernard and Virginia’s son.

 

 

Virginia: is now married to Joe. She doesn’t drive. Failed twice at test when younger. Virginia and Joe found each other again after fifty years, after Bernard and Virginia separated. V. is portly with a grandmotherly manner.

 

 

Joe Sussman: married to Virginia. Studied history in graduate school but sells mattresses for family business. He has two sons; his wife died when boys were in college. He is retired. He is a cautious driver.

 

 

Aimee: dark hair, dark eyes. Small frame.

 

 

Adam Freytoch: he designs running shoes. Is very young. Adam is naïve and in love with his writing. Adam’s first novel weighed seven pounds. Helene was his mentor.

Adam is working on a novel about an American businessman and a Russian woman who might be a prostitute.

 

 

Kim(Kimberly): Adam’s girlfriend.

 

Christopher Billingsley: seeks approval. Writes thrillers. Tan, smooth shaven, women like his looks. He is a novelist (not a literary novelist according to Gillian) But he makes a living as writer. He was managing editor on the Yorktown Tribune. He has a sportscar. He was brought in the group by Virginia. He lived in the same house as her daughter Rachel. He was married twice.

 

 

Valerie: Chris’s first wife, his college girl friend, social worker at teenage facility.

 

Julie: Chris’s first intense relationship after Valerie. In the landscaping business.

 

 

Simone: Chris’s second intense relationship after Valerie. Reference librarian.

 

 

Susan Pratt: Chris’s third intense relationship after Valerie. Rising vice president in mortgage department of a bank. They marry and have two sons in three years.

 

 

Samuel and Benjamin: Chris’s sons from his marriage with Susan Pratt.

 

Lydia: Chris’s sister who lives in Boston. Accompanies him to his colonoscopy.

 

 

Julie: nurse at hospital where Chris has colonoscopy.

 

 

Other Julie: long frizzy blond hair, bandana. Chris had an affair with her a decade ago. Shaved arm pits for him but not her legs.

 

 

Dave: Chris’s lawyer.

 

 

Gillian Coit: she is a recognized poet. Her braided hair reaches below her waist. Adam is

in love with her. Gillian doesn’t want other poets in the group. Not lesser ones or better ones.

Gillian works on a six -part poem. She indulges in exclusivity according to Nancy.

 

 

Paul Traub: he is Gillian’s stepson.

 

 

Jennifer: is Paul’s sister.

 

 

Jerry: Paul’s dad. Gillian’s husband.

 

 

Mr. O’Connor: runs the ice arena where Paul practices. He was once a hockey player.

 

 

Helene Spivack. Died of lung cancer. Nancy is her replacement in the group.

 

 

Christa Worthington: murdered in her house in Truro

 

 

Pete Ambrose: handyman who checks Gillian’s house in Truro in winter. Married to Marie Ambrose.

 

Robert Oates Mullingford: Nancy’s live-in lover. Has grey hair which Nancy cuts.

 

 

Teresa Kleinholz: Nancy’s friend. She has little blue eyes, a pudgy face, and wears itchy sweaters and scarves that she knits, and differs in political opinion with her friend Nancy.

 

 

Kate Kleinholz: Teresa’s daughter. In high school.

 

 

Dick Smollett: once a member of the Leopardis. He nabbed a Ma Arthur (whatever that means.)

 

 

Giacomo Leopardi was pessimistic, tortured, passionate (as Helene pointed out) He is the Italian poet after whom Helene named the group.

 

Herb Miller: the Kleinholz’s neighbor who buries the horse

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for our lovely study guide to the characters, Sunltcloud! 

 

I think Dick Smollet was awarded a MacArthur "genius" award, which is a prize of something like a half million dollars and probably worth more than that in chest-puffing. 

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Rachel-K
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

 

darthlaurie wrote:

So...are they really close-knit or are they just exclusive?

 

Thanks, Darthlaurie. This is an interesting distinction to think about, especially as the relationships continue to develop.

 

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Sunltcloud
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

Thanks Rachel for clearing that up. I was confused by the word "nabbed," which made it sound as if he had stolen the award, leading me to believe that he hadn't earned it.

 

Rachel-K wrote:

 

Thanks for our lovely study guide to the characters, Sunltcloud! 

 

I think Dick Smollet was awarded a MacArthur "genius" award, which is a prize of something like a half million dollars and probably worth more than that in chest-puffing. 

 

 

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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

This is a very interesting group; a group where each person relies on the others. They have a symbiotic relationship as they share their comments on each others works and in turn, share their personal writing. I sense a vulnerability in each of them no matter how they seem to be on the page. They seem to be a cohesive group, but aren't sure of newcomers. Would a newcomer treat their words/ideas with compassion and professionalism? Hence the uncertain air in the room when Nancy arrived. (Was Nancy not told about the procedures on purpose? Was it a way to find out how she would respond?) Voting for someone is one thing, but would she really fit in? I think they need the constructive criticism and support they receive from each other because they are putting their written ideas out there. There is also the air of "anything goes" with this group - we will see if that holds up as the reading continues.

 

I think Chris took Nancy to lunch to get to know her and to see if she would fit in. There may be more "interest" on his part, but again, I will have to wait until I read more.

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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dhaupt
Posts: 11,827
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

[ Edited ]

 

Deanne75 wrote:

How would you describe each member of the "Leopardis" and how they came to be a part of the group?

 

Nancy strikes me as someone who is very hesitant to change.  She has become very comfortable writing her medical newsletter articles and seems really insecure about her novel.  She has recently been faced with the change of her daughter leaving home, even writing an article about "emply nest syndrome" just for fun even though it will not be published in the newsletter.

 

Bernard is just odd.  He's an older man, married to a younger woman.  I don't really get the dynamic between him and Aimee.  It seems to me like he's trying to hang on to his youth rather than embracing his maturity.  He completely changes his demeanor when around Aimee.  He becomes submissive and allows her to make him feel guilty for being a part of the Leopardis.  Whereas, when he is with the other members of the circle, he becomes somewhat pompous and self absorbed.  Of all the members of the circle, I think he allows his membership in it to define him the most.

 

Chris is just as two sided as Bernard is. He seems both the fast-talking, fast-driving, free-wheeling, "I'm a hotshot novelist", and also devoted father and lonely divorced guy wronged by a manipulative ex-wife.

 

Adam is a little puppy dog that looks up to the other members of the group and is desperate for acceptance and approval.

 

Virginia has stepped into the matriarch role of the group after Helene's passing.  She is the one member of the group who seems genuine in their participation in the group...meaning she's not just there to feed her ego.

 

Gillian - Wow.  She is a piece of work.  She IS an accomplished and talented poet.  She seems to think herself above the other members of the group.  She is manipulative and just all around not a very nice person.

 

Although deceased, I think Helene warrants a mention as a member of the circle.  The group seems to be floundering a bit after her passing and trying to decide what it wants to be when it grows up, so to speak.

 

What is Chris' motivation is for inviting Nancy to lunch?

 

I think Chris' motivaion for inviting Nancy to lunch is mostly to feel out her opinions of the other members of the circle.  I think he wants to know if she is "friend or foe".  I also think the "I'm a hotshot novelist" side of him wanted to feel her out romantically.

 

Do you get a sense for how each of the characters is reflected in the work he or she does as a writer? Are their writing styles a part of their personalities here?

 

I would agree that to some extent their writing styles are a part of their personalities.  Gillian sees herself as aloof and intellegent which is exhibited in her poetry.  Adam seems to equate substance with quality which is evident in his pride that his first novel weighed 7 pounds.  His characters seem to reflect the type of person he wants to be.  The main character of Chris's novels seems to reflect some of his personality as well.

 

 

 

 

Deanne, great insight. I don't agree with every thing you've said, but it gives me something to think about. I tended to see the best in all of them except the ones I couldn't stand from the beginning. Thanks for your input.

Gosh I love this club and how I learn something from everyone here.

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Goodword
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

For me, it is so early in the novel, and I feel that so many details about each character are being thrown at me, that I find it difficult to decide which details are important.  I can identify with Nancy's insecurity and vulnerability as she eases into the group.  I think that she will have something to add, but it will take time for her role to be defined.  Adam is weak and seems to garner little respect from the others. Chris, while obviously successful in his genre,  does not seem to be very important to the group, and I was surprised when he asked Nancy to lunch.  Is he more important than I thought?  I assumed then that he was either trying to smooth things with her, or genuinely trying to get to know her and be friendly.  I wonder how Bernard knew Nancy.  I like Virginia--she is strong, experienced, balanced.  I am a high school teacher, and I've seen students like Gillian--talented, beautiful, and/or wealthy, who think they can rule the school and answer to no one.

 

I'm not sure that we see each character's writing style directly, unless it is through the genre they write.  In that case, Adam's novel seems appropriate to him.

 

 

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maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

I agree, Susan.We can't really make comments on the writers as there is not enough info to agree with them or not. I still do not like Gillian as she seems full of herself and must have high esteem for her personality. I guess there is always one in every walk of life.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

[ Edited ]

 

maxcat wrote:

I agree, Susan.We can't really make comments on the writers as there is not enough info to agree with them or not. I still do not like Gillian as she seems full of herself and must have high esteem for her personality. I guess there is always one in every walk of life.

 

Thank you Maxcat that was nice of you to comment..I can and probably will relate to in some way to each Character..We are all not one dimensional people,and its refreshing that Corinne can elicit such passion from us in such a short frame of time...Its very contemporary,yet these relationships which happen in everyday life are ageless..Why is everyone so harsh when speaking about Gillian? She does what she does,and if men chose not to parcipitae then fine,but if they do..its just who she is,or just is showing that side to her at this point..

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

 

Vermontcozy wrote:

 

maxcat wrote:

I agree, Susan.We can't really make comments on the writers as there is not enough info to agree with them or not. I still do not like Gillian as she seems full of herself and must have high esteem for her personality. I guess there is always one in every walk of life.

 

Thank you Maxcat that was nice of you to comment..I can and probably will relate to in some way to each Character..We are all not one dimensional people,and its refreshing that Corinne can elicit such passion from us in such a short frame of time...Its very contemporary,yet these relationships which happen in everyday life are ageless..Why is everyone so harsh when speaking about Gillian? She does what she does,and if men chose not to parcipitae then fine,but if they do..its just who she is,or just is showing that side to her at this point..

 

 

I agree that this first section has elicited a lot of passions about the characters in the writing circle. When I think of that, I can see how Corinne has involved us with the characters so quickly. As far as Gillian, I think we will find out more about her. It is still early in the book. The author is just giving us the information she wants us to know at this point of the novel. The next section will give us more detail in each of their lives.

pen21

Wordsmith
kpatton
Posts: 206
Registered: ‎11-27-2006

Re: The Writing Circle: The Circle

I am going to post in a general way to this question and come back with more specifics later.

My sense of how this group formed is that it was started by a few that knew one another such as Bernard, Virginia, Gillian and Helen.  These members then invited other writers that they wanted to mentor into the group.

 

There are definitely dominating members, Bernard and Gillian for sure.  Seems like the rules are that you have to be voted in and then you only get to present your writing when the group determines that you are worthy.  I am thinking that the more senior members of the group- Bernard, Virginia and Gillian get to share they materials all of the time.  It also looks like you always say positive things about their writing but it would be ok for them to make more critical responses about the other's writings.

 

 

Kathy