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Peppermill
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


literature wrote:

Wilson left no room for the imagination of any one who read Piet's record.  "Extremely antisocial personality disorder.  No ability to emphathize.  Extensive reports, significant characteristics include impulsiveness, aggression, lack of respect for own and others' safety, lack of conscience."  Sven read this to Gren and Gren felt he had no other choice but to authorize the sniper fire.  This gnawed at me, the same that the killing at the flat and this prisoner gone mad had gnawed at Gren.  Something didn't seem right.  I really think he was set up by Wilson on both ends.  Just as Piet had his own sideline drug business, it just seems so easy that Wilson could be doing the same thing and Piet was used as an means to a personal end for Wilson.

Piet's lack of respect certainly turned a different corner when he told Jacobson  that "soon there would be an almighty explosion, that he should stay exactly where he was, that if he did that he would be protected and wouldn't die.".  He even took the time to cover him with the carpet and curtain.  Then we see the other side of Piet when he wires the hostage prisoner and blows him to bits when the diesel fuel ignited with the nitroglycerin.  Piet vs. Paula.  The difference, and it is only a rationalization, is that Jacobson served society whereas the prisoner was a menace to society.


 

Lit  -- a reaction:  second paragraph, brilliant.  (But does Piet mirror Grens's logic about which lives are valuable?)  First paragraph, not so sure that's the right track.  The killing at the flat gnawed at Piet, too.  Wilson has a tough job.  I find myself likening his role to whomever "handles" those who infiltrate terrorist groups, which I presume is a part of our own U.S. "Homeland Security," at least since 9-11.

 

I do, however, wonder why Wilson returned to the U.S. when Piet was incarcerated.  After all, early in the book, he instructed Piet not to go ahead without him.  Why didn't Wilson choose to be in Sweden during THIS "big deal"?  Somehow, it seemed another place where the needs of the story (plot) got in the way of what might have been more realistic.  (We have commented that this does happen several times, from a whole bouquet of tulips with no single blossom that opens prematurely to books that return to the shelves and get redelivered promptly to plans that match what actually happens so closely, to....  But, all details that do little to decrease the impact of the story and may indeed enhance it.)

 

Possible spoiler, at least a foreshadowing:  Interesting to me is that Piet ended up "trusting" Grens long before he could have had any idea that it would be Grens who would be deciding whether to shoot at him.  I wonder what were the sources of the knowledge that took Piet to that trust.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Tarri
Posts: 457
Registered: ‎02-26-2007

Ewert Grens

 

We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?
 
Why do you think Grens detects something wrong about the stories he's being given by police and prison officials?
 
Why does Grens attempt to go the cemetery twice in these chapters? Can you describe his struggle?
 

 

Someone said earlier in our discussion that Ewert Grens was like Colombo, but I think he is more like Adrian Monk.  He doesn't appear to have dealt with his wife's death and is myopic in his view of this (and probably any) crime.  He is not able to deal with people and life in a socially acceptable way, in fact, he almost seems to have some Asperger's traits.

 

Some of the officers around him appear (we don't really know them well) more willing to go along with the superiors and not question what they are told. They do not like to interact with Grens because he is so prickly. 

 

I think Grens does not go to the cemetery because he doesn't want the finality of his wife no longer being among the living.   He knows he should go, but he is not ready. 

 

As to why he detects inconsistencies in what he is being told, he is also learning through his investigation that those things are untrue. 

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literature
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


Hi TWJ, 
I wrote that Wilson was back in Georgia, top of page 173, "He had explained to Piet that he would go back to FLETC and southern Georgia to finish what he had been forced to interrupt a couple of days ago."  When I had first read "Georgia", I thought he was talking about the Georgia, near Russia, but then I remembered reading about Georgia and "when the warm air that came from somewhere in the Atlantic..." and figured it was Georgia USA, top of page 7 and near the top of page 8.
thewanderingjew wrote:

Did I miss something in Part 3. Someone wrote that Wilson was in Georgia and I don't remember that part. Regardless, it is a really well written novel and it has kept me on the edge of my seat. I really don't think I will be able to wait to finish it, until next week. If Rachel is reading this, please, please, in a few days, open up a thread for the whole book. I really can't put it down now! For me this is better than the Larsson series. In those the details were so heavy, sometimes, that I had to put the book down because I


literature wrote:

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

I have not finished yet, does your comment mean that Wilson never gets him out of isolation as planned? I stopped reading at WHERE IS HE because I don't want to read about what I don't know yet.

I will be madder than you know what if that is true...onward to the book, now I go!

I think you and I are on the same page in our feelings about what appears to be happening to Piet.

 


literature wrote:
I just have to let off some steam.  Part III was W-O-W.  .

 

I am completely disillusioned with Wilson, have lost all respect for him.  WHERE IS HE? 

 


Keep reading.  My blood was boiling while I read it.  I can't discuss it with you until you finish Part III.  Read carefully, a lot of information in this part.  I read myself to sleep Sunday night because I had to finish this section but, of course, I fell asleep reading and wound up getting up in the middle of the night to read more.  Finally finished Part III while eating breakfast.

 


got tired of reading them. With this one, I have to put it down so that I can continue to breathe! I find myself holding my breath until I turn the page!

 


 

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Peppermill
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

[ Edited ]

 


thewanderingjew wrote (excerpt):

Piet is an absolute genius. I don't know how he knew all of the information he needed to pull this off, but he planned and executed it perfectly. I would like to strangle the State Secretary. She and her cohorts were so cold and calculating. I asked myself, why is it the only one who doesn't question the "rightness" or "wrongness" of what they are doing, is a woman??? She seems so cold and calculating. I thought women were supposed to be more emotional, more nurturing.

 


While it was uncomfortable to encounter a woman so portrayed, I thought that such was one of the brilliant artistic aspects of the novel.  B&H challenge lots of shibboleths. 

 

 

To be totally accurate, she does deliberate over the "rightness" and "wrongness," but not in ways that seem morally satisfying nor consistent with justice.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 

Thanks, you cleared it up for me. I thought he had already returned. I think my mind just decided that he, like the others, had been ignoring him. I feel much better about Wilson now. Maybe he didn't even know "Paula" was in trouble. I am hoping that he will have some conscience left!


literature wrote:

 


Hi TWJ, 
I wrote that Wilson was back in Georgia, top of page 173, "He had explained to Piet that he would go back to FLETC and southern Georgia to finish what he had been forced to interrupt a couple of days ago."  When I had first read "Georgia", I thought he was talking about the Georgia, near Russia, but then I remembered reading about Georgia and "when the warm air that came from somewhere in the Atlantic..." and figured it was Georgia USA, top of page 7 and near the top of page 8.
thewanderingjew wrote:

Did I miss something in Part 3. Someone wrote that Wilson was in Georgia and I don't remember that part. Regardless, it is a really well written novel and it has kept me on the edge of my seat. I really don't think I will be able to wait to finish it, until next week. If Rachel is reading this, please, please, in a few days, open up a thread for the whole book. I really can't put it down now! For me this is better than the Larsson series. In those the details were so heavy, sometimes, that I had to put the book down because I


 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

You are so right. Actually, this book is really making me question so much about the meaning of the word justice! I guess that is the mark of a really good book. It certainly makes one think about things on many different levels.


Peppermill wrote:

 


thewanderingjew wrote (excerpt):

Piet is an absolute genius. I don't know how he knew all of the information he needed to pull this off, but he planned and executed it perfectly. I would like to strangle the State Secretary. She and her cohorts were so cold and calculating. I asked myself, why is it the only one who doesn't question the "rightness" or "wrongness" of what they are doing, is a woman??? She seems so cold and calculating. I thought women were supposed to be more emotional, more nurturing.

 


While it was uncomfortable to encounter a woman so portrayed, I thought that such was one of the brilliant artistic aspects of the novel.  B&H challenge lots of shibboleths. 

 

 

To be totally accurate, she does deliberate over the "rightness" and "wrongness," but not in ways that seem morally satisfying nor consistent with justice.


 

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mystery-woman
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

In every organization I believe there are good people and bad.  In this case I am beginning to believe that it is Grens taking on the world.  The officials over him are doing what they can to hide and decieve.  Grens, although struggling with his grief, uses that to push him ever forward in his work.  Work is an excuse not to grieve, so he continues to pick at the little things that are bothering him about the case.  He cannot let go because if he does, he must face his own problems.  He has seen enough death in his work to make it impersonal, yet his wife's must make him face that each death he sees is personal to someone.  I think the reason he works so hard and cannot go to the cemetary, is that he knows that if he faces his own wife's death, he will fall apart slowly with each case he works on.  So in order to make his own life bearable, he puts off the inevitable, so that life goes on.  What he doesn't realize yet is that, when it becomes personal to an officer, it makes him better and stronger.  Erik Wilson may be a perfect example of that.

 

I have a question though.  Has anyone thought about the phone Piet buried in the graveyard?  I know this will be explained in Part Four, but I believe it is an express line to the only person he knows can help, Erik Wilson.

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BookWoman718
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

Thanks, you cleared it up for me. I thought he had already returned. I think my mind just decided that he, like the others, had been ignoring him. I feel much better about Wilson now. Maybe he didn't even know "Paula" was in trouble. I am hoping that he will have some conscience left!


literature wrote:

 


Hi TWJ, 
I wrote that Wilson was back in Georgia, top of page 173, "He had explained to Piet that he would go back to FLETC and southern Georgia to finish what he had been forced to interrupt a couple of days ago."  When I had first read "Georgia", I thought he was talking about the Georgia, near Russia, but then I remembered reading about Georgia and "when the warm air that came from somewhere in the Atlantic..." and figured it was Georgia USA, top of page 7 and near the top of page 8.
thewanderingjew wrote:

Did I miss something in Part 3. Someone wrote that Wilson was in Georgia and I don't remember that part. Regardless, it is a really well written novel and it has kept me on the edge of my seat.

 


The plan was that Piet would be in jail and incommunicado for a a couple of months while he took down the rival drug dealers and established the Wojtek gang - and then eventually took them down.   If all went according to plan, Piet wouldn't be able to talk to Erik during that time, no matter where he (Erik) was.  If it didn't go according to plan, Piet had that emergency number to call as his right as a prisoner.  That call went directly to Goransson, Erik's boss.  Erik should have been able to trust his boss to look out for his prize informant in that situation.   I posted a question to the authors questioning Goransson's panicky reaction to Grens' sniffing around.  But so far no answer...   Why Goransson would be so afraid of his own employee has me very puzzled.   And why his solution would be to set up a murder of an informant they'd been working with for years just doesn't make sense.   To spend nine years, time and money, to get an infiltrator into a trusted place within a criminal organization, and then to panic and throw all that away - by setting up a murder! - instead of just telling Grens to take two weeks vacation or something seems more than a little unlikely.

 

My next question to the authors is going to be, have there been any cases that came to light where this sort of thing actually happened?   The police and beaurocrats entering into a conspiracy to burn an informant, I mean. 

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OKC_NookJA
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

[ Edited ]

 


Peppermill wrote:

 


So back to my original question, or at least a variant thereof:  What is the point B&H are making by sending Wilson to the U.S. to get the best training -- I believe it says somewhere in advanced infiltration skills?

 

(As another diversion, put what Wilson said in the context that Sven is representing Grens at this point, that Grens was the gold commander who made the decision about shooting Piet, and there never seemed to be a lot of love lost between Grens and Wilson on how to pursue crime when/if necessary.  Which of them is proactive?  Which reactive to crime?  Does it matter?   When, why, where....)

 

Final comment, not sure it is a logical necessity from what Wilson says that he doesn't mind his informants being burned.  Doesn't the statement seem more James Bond cryptic for the situation at hand than one from which to generalize or apply formal logic.


You are correct, Wilson was taking advanced infiltration - p. 427
There could be many nuances in sending Wilson to the U.S. to train including:
* Getting the best training since the U.S. does train in all areas of police and the military for its allies.
* To send Wilson away from Piet.
* To show the U.S. does lead and condone infiltration of organizations.
I could only guess as to why the authors sent him to this location.Maybe it to allude to the fact some police departments in the U.S. do the same thing.
--
Wilson is proactive and Grens reactive to crime. But I think the bigger question is: should the police break the law in order to catch others who break it? One of the characters commented, I'm not sure which one, that this is not the way to do it in an open and democratic society. There are argueably many different situations and domestic crime as opposed to terrorism. But here it is the police breaking the law and allowing the infiltrators to break the law and then cover it up.
--
I thought Wilson's comment signified Wilson didn't was furious that they burned HIS infiltrator. I thought it was a weird reason to assist in turning in his boss since, as part of what he was doing, he knew infiltrators were burned. And if he is supportive of it and that he would devote years of his life, he obviously thought the advantages outweighed the disadvantages.
Also since he was getting advanced training, does that signify he was assisting with more infiltrators or in working with other officers that were handlers?

BTW Peppermill, thanks for the questions and discussion. You, and others, are causing me to think deeper about what is going on :smileyhappy:

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OKC_NookJA
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


Peppermill wrote:

 


thewanderingjew wrote (excerpt):

Piet is an absolute genius. I don't know how he knew all of the information he needed to pull this off, but he planned and executed it perfectly. I would like to strangle the State Secretary. She and her cohorts were so cold and calculating. I asked myself, why is it the only one who doesn't question the "rightness" or "wrongness" of what they are doing, is a woman??? She seems so cold and calculating. I thought women were supposed to be more emotional, more nurturing.

 


While it was uncomfortable to encounter a woman so portrayed, I thought that such was one of the brilliant artistic aspects of the novel.  B&H challenge lots of shibboleths. 

 

 

To be totally accurate, she does deliberate over the "rightness" and "wrongness," but not in ways that seem morally satisfying nor consistent with justice.


Not sure if you have worked for bosses who are this way, but I can tell you there are both men and women who are the same way. It just so happened that one time a department I was in was laid off  and corporate sent a women to deliver the news(VP I think). She was cold as ice. To be in a position this State Secretary was in almost requires this type of resolve.

 

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thewanderingjew
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

Actually, I did once have a female boss that was like that. I remember the day i looked at her and said "I quit". Boy was it satisfying! She had a mouth like a toilet and never hesitated to use it. She was angry all the time. It was not a happy place to work.

 


OKC_NookJA wrote:

 


Peppermill wrote:

 


thewanderingjew wrote (excerpt):

Piet is an absolute genius. I don't know how he knew all of the information he needed to pull this off, but he planned and executed it perfectly. I would like to strangle the State Secretary. She and her cohorts were so cold and calculating. I asked myself, why is it the only one who doesn't question the "rightness" or "wrongness" of what they are doing, is a woman??? She seems so cold and calculating. I thought women were supposed to be more emotional, more nurturing.

 


While it was uncomfortable to encounter a woman so portrayed, I thought that such was one of the brilliant artistic aspects of the novel.  B&H challenge lots of shibboleths. 

 

 

To be totally accurate, she does deliberate over the "rightness" and "wrongness," but not in ways that seem morally satisfying nor consistent with justice.


Not sure if you have worked for bosses who are this way, but I can tell you there are both men and women who are the same way. It just so happened that one time a department I was in was laid off  and corporate sent a women to deliver the news(VP I think). She was cold as ice. To be in a position this State Secretary was in almost requires this type of resolve.

 


 

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Peppermill
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

I believe Erik Wilson's five phones imply he is handling five infiltrators simultaneously.

 

There is an interesting passage on p. 128 that relates to some of the discussion here and suggests again how cognizant Piet is of the environment, politics, and people:

 

"Piet Hoffmann heard what she was saying....  She had made up her mind to overlook his presence which, legally, was tantamount to accomplice to murder. She was taking a risk.  And deemed that it was one worth taking. He knew of at least two other occasions where she had granted a secret pardon to infiltrators who had been given a prison sentence.  But he was fairly certain that she had never before chosen to overlook what she knew about an unsolved crime--solutions normally stopped at the level of the police."

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


OKC_NookJA wrote (excerpt):

 

BTW Peppermill, thanks for the questions and discussion. You, and others, are causing me to think deeper about what is going on :smileyhappy:


 

OKC -- THANK YOU for your thoughtful responses.  These are subjects on which I am fairly stupid.  It is a privilege to hear responsible fellow readers and citizens wrestle with them -- and to wrestle alongside them.  Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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TudorRose
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

All I can say is WOW!  This book keeps getting better and better.  I can't stop thinking about it and keep questioning and pondering what is happening in the story.  This is not something I would normally choose for myself, but I am so glad that FL made it available to us.  Thanks to the authors for a fantastic thrill ride and thanks (again) to B&N FL for broadening my literary horizons!
 
 
In what ways were Piet Hoffmann's plans for entering prison working out exactly as he'd organized them?
 
Everything is working like clock work for Piet when he first enters Aspsas.  Everything that he intuited or anticipated has worked out exactly how he planned.  I was amazed at all the eventualities that he planned for and how they all fell into place.  That is until he was burned, but he was ready for that.  I just can't stop thinking about who burned him and why.  Can't wait to finish this last section!
What was life in prison like and how did Piet fit in there?
Terrifying, violent, lonely.  I don't think the real Piet fits in there at all.  The real Piet wants to be with his wife and children living a normal life.  "Paula" fits in because he understands how the system works and he has planned in excrutiating detail what to do to stay alive (I hope!)
 
What interferes with his carefully orchestrated plans?
 
The jerk in the police or government who burns him!  I still don't get who or why.  Can't wait to find out.  I'm sure I will be surprised!
How would you judge Piet as a man in these chapters if you'd had no picture of his life outside the prison walls before this?
 
If you didn't know who he really was, you would think he was who his dummied profile says he is, a violent sociopath and drug dealer.  Reminds you of how easily you can be deceived when you judge a book by its cover.
We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?
 
Grens is one of the few officers who is thinking outside of their assumptions about Piet based on his "profile".  He knows something isn't right, but he can't put the pieces together in time.  Compared to his superiors, Grens actually cares about people.  They aren't disposable to him, maybe because of his personal loss, he places a higher value on life.
Why do you think Grens detects something wrong about the stories he's being given by police and prison officials?
 
Grens is extraordinarily intuitive and dogged in his investigations.  There isn't anything specific that tips him off.  Things just feel off to him.  I don't think it is anything even he could put into words at this point, but this investigation is different, the pieces just don't fit together the way they should.  He just doesn't know why yet.
Why does Grens attempt to go the cemetery twice in these chapters? Can you describe his struggle?
 
Grens attempts to go to the cemetery in an effort to let go off his grief for his wife.  I think that by not attending her funeral or going to her grave he is able to keep a part of her alive.  He doesn't want to let that go.  He doesn't want to let go of the grief and the guilt he feels.  I think he is terrified that if he lets all that go, there won't be anything of Grens left.  He wants to let go but he doesn't know how and part of him still wants to hold on.  I hope that he is able to find some measure of happiness, if not in this book, than certainly in subsequent novels.
Can't wait to finish reading and discussing this great book with all of you.
Kimberly from Ohio

"A room without a book is like a body without a soul"
~Marcus Tullius Cicero
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TudorRose
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three


thewanderingjew wrote:

I am not far enough into Part 3 yet to answer all of the questions but this story is making me want to shake a fist at all the people involved in Piet's life. They are using him and yes, he knows they are using him, but, the ease with which they betray him is horrifying to me. They are so concerned for their own skins that they never consider his. They just decide to sacrifice him.

What disturbes me most is that they don't realize that they are just as guilty, perhaps guiltier than he is because they see him as a criminal but they do not see themselves that way and they are just as much a criminal as he is for what they have done.

They use him to accomplish their job and then when something goes awry, they don't try and save him, they save themselves. What makes them better than him?. He is making a sacrifice to help them, they are sacrificing him! Oh, I am so angry. I am even angrier when I think that these kinds of behaviors often go undiscovered if not for these kinds of authors who expose them.

Okay, I have to reduce my blood pressure and read on.


Well said WanderingJew.  I totally agree that the people in the government as just as bad as the criminals in this book.  In this situation, Piet is not guilty of anything.  The government has just ordered his execution.  This is so horrific.  Sending an innocent man to his death without any concern for him or his family while they just sit back and justify their actions is incomprehensible to me. 

Kimberly from Ohio

"A room without a book is like a body without a soul"
~Marcus Tullius Cicero
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TudorRose
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three


literature wrote:
I just have to let off some steam.  Part III was W-O-W.  .

 

I am completely disillusioned with Wilson, have lost all respect for him.  WHERE IS HE?  He talks about how much Piet means to him, he's become a friend.  He's envious of him.  A loving wife and two beautiful children.  Zofia must know the truth before he enters the prison.  Wilson goes to all lengths to make sure that everything is in order before he is arrested.  Makes sure that Piet knows about all the prisoners in his block.  Even the names of the two men from the Polish Wojtek office.  Everything is set up in advance.  Wilson gets him a "reward" job, unheard of as a newcomer, a job as cleaner in Block B cleaning the bathrooms and the warden's room.  A guarantee that we will look after you when the work is done.  I know that you will then have a death threat on you, branded throughout the criminal world.  We will give you a new life, a new identity, and money to start over again abroad.  I guarantee you this in my capacity as a state secretary of the Ministry of Justice.  Notice that the guarantee from the state secretary was for "when the work was done".  Only Wilson promised he get him out a week after he got the phone call from him that he went into solitary confinement.

Piet knew that Block B was a closed system with no escape.  If I'm exposed.  If I'm burned.  If I'm alone.  "He would no longer have any choice.  He would die."  Piet was so clever in all his preparations.  Everything was so mathematically figured out and strategically positioned.  He knew where to position Jacobson so he would be safe.  He knew the three second countdown.  He was in control with the sniper and Gren teasing them with the first two attempts that I can't believe he didn't know how far he could go within that third second.  He was still standing by the window at two seconds.  Could he reach the area where Jacobson was in a split second?  He was too clever.  He had to figure something out.  His main goal has always been to survive.  He loved Zofia so much and the boys.  Was he will to give up a life with them.  I don't buy that.  If he figured out where to position Jacobson, cover him with the rug and the curtain, then he had to have planned out some scheme for himself.   If he did survive and run, he certainly wouldn't want Jacobson to know about it.  Never trust anyone.

Wilson was going back to FLETC and southern Georgia to finish what he had been forced to interrupt a couple of days ago.  With all the advanced preparations that were put into place ahead of time, why wasn't a better contact system set up.  Another telephone number for Piet to call that went directly to a newly set up Wilson telephone, an untraceable telephone and new number.  Wilson already had five telephones set up for different contacts, Piet's would not be used, so this new one could have replaced Piet's.  I think Wilson is working both sides, the good policeman working with infiltrators to bust the Polish drug mafia, and Wilson, the drug mafia himself, perhaps obliterating the Polish mafia in his way.    

 


Literature, I have also been suspicious about Erik since the beginning of the book.  Now I am wondering if it is all to easy to make him the bad guy.  Could he be working to help Piet, to somehow get him out of the country, maybe to the US?  I'm just starting to think there might be more to Erik than I originally thought.   Can't wait to find out!

Kimberly from Ohio

"A room without a book is like a body without a soul"
~Marcus Tullius Cicero
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literature
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


dhaupt wrote:

OMG if part four gets any more exciting than part three I'll have to take frequent breaks to calm my pulse and blood pressure. I have been biting my nails and sweating right along with Piet. I don't know how he kept his sanity through all of this. 

 

Can't resist here, dhaupt.  The difference between you and Piet and to quote our authors, "to be a criminal, you have to live like a criminal."  Obviously, you don't.  Sorry, couldn't resist.  I completely agree with you.  There were many a times in Part III where my adrenaline was pumping and that was why I posted to let off steam.  Where else can we talk so freely and be understood!  I haven't read ahead yet.  Am still digesting Part III.  I have to calm down about Wilson and read with a more open mind where he is concerned.  I'm really trying.

 

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dhaupt
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


literature wrote:

 


dhaupt wrote:

 


literature wrote:
I just have to let off some steam.  Part III was W-O-W.  .

 

I am completely disillusioned with Wilson, have lost all respect for him.  WHERE IS HE?  He talks about how much Piet means to him, he's become a friend. 

 

Hi literature, I remember in part two when Erik and Piet were putting the final touches on the prison sentence that Wilson stated that it would be some days before he would know if anything went wrong because he would be back at Quantico.

And I remember in part three while Piet was in prison that he recounted this.

 

I reserving my opinion of Erik until I find out more in part four, because I'm still giving him the benefit of the doubt.

 


 

You're a better person than me!  I should be more patient.  Wilson was down in the southern part of Georgia, not Quantico.  I reread the beginning pages again this morning to see if I could pick up some new feelings about Wilson.  He is a hardened human being, a loner and a very lonely person but capable of showing emotion to Piet.  


That's right it was Georgia, good call literature. And as far as feelings for Erik, I think we each have to be true to ourselves.

 

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dhaupt
Posts: 11,832
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

You are so right. Actually, this book is really making me question so much about the meaning of the word justice! I guess that is the mark of a really good book. It certainly makes one think about things on many different levels.


twj, you have the same feelings as I do about this. My good vs evil belief is quite skewed at the moment.

 

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elaine_hf
Posts: 389
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

[ Edited ]

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Did I miss something in Part 3. Someone wrote that Wilson was in Georgia and I don't remember that part. Regardless, it is a really well written novel and it has kept me on the edge of my seat. I really don't think I will be able to wait to finish it, until next week. If Rachel is reading this, please, please, in a few days, open up a thread for the whole book. I really can't put it down now!


Bold, above, was added
Actually, Erik's location is not really mentioned again, I don't think, until well into Part IV (p. 427). The frustration for me in Part III was - where the heck is Erik???
I guess I wasn't the only one who really couldn't put the book down...  :smileysurprised:

 

‎"Peculiar travel suggestions are dancing lessons from God." -Bokonon