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Wordsmith
Deltadawn
Posts: 311
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

Just finished the section this morning. It was so great - though it filled me with such anxiety as I read!

My responses are below.

 


Rachel-K wrote:
Hi all,
Please feel free to use any of the following questions to discuss Part Three of Three Seconds, and please also feel free to post your own thoughts and questions for the group!
 
In what ways were Piet Hoffmann's plans for entering prison working out exactly as he'd organized them? Piet's plans for entering prison worked out exactly as he had geniusly & meticulously organized them.
 
What was life in prison like and how did Piet fit in there? In prison Piet had to be constantly on alert and constantly in character. He also had to be aware of every single detail of what was going on around him at all times.
 
What interferes with his carefully orchestrated plans? The authorities (police & secretary of state) who promised to protect him interfere with his carefully orchestrated plans by deciding to "burn" him to save their own hides.
 
How would you judge Piet as a man in these chapters if you'd had no picture of his life outside the prison walls before this? Well, seen in these chapters alone - he seemed cold, heartless and calculating, murderous. He also was terrified, shocked at the betrayal he realized had taken place against him, and extremely capable of overcoming his personal fear to achieve what he set out to achieve.
 
We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?
Ewert strives in all ways to do the right thing - he is dedicated and smart and unwavering and focused. He is not corruptable. He has a conscience and it guides his actions.

Why do you think Grens detects something wrong about the stories he's being given by police and prison officials? He can see all the inconsistencies - starting with the fact that Piet was issued a gun and yet he had a record of violence.
 
Why does Grens attempt to go the cemetery twice in these chapters? Can you describe his struggle?He is struggling to come to terms with the death of his wife. He has been unable to visit her in the cemetary in the past, but is preparing himself to do so.
 
 
 

 

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MomOf2Turds
Posts: 46
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 

In what ways were Piet Hoffmann's plans for entering prison working out exactly as he'd organized them?
He was able to get the drugs from the books that he had hidden, along with the gun, the transmitter, and the explosives.  He was also able to get the drugs from the tulips that he had sent there.  He took out the "competition" dealers.  He became the only dealer on the inside.
 
What was life in prison like and how did Piet fit in there?
Life in prison was rough.  You were either a top dog who no one messed with or questioned or you were on the bottom.  Piet knew the ropes.  He knew what to look for, he knew how to hide things, he knew how to get things.  He had been there before and knew what to expect.  He also knew how he needed to act in order to pull off the facade that he was this hard core bad guy to get the respect and submission that he needed.
 
What interferes with his carefully orchestrated plans?
Grens is finally able to get to his name to question him, which sets off the entire chain of events.  When Chief Superintendent Göransson realized where Grens was headed in the investigation, he went to the national police commissioner and told him that Hoffmann needed to be "burned."  Which led to Lennart Oscarsson to allow Stefan Lygás's lawyer (because he was told to) in to see him after hours, which led to Piet being outed as a snitch.  The he had to begin to fight for his life.  Thus, the huge kink in his plans.

How would you judge Piet as a man in these chapters if you'd had no picture of his life outside the prison walls before this?
I would wonder where he learned so much about the inside workings of the prison system, and how to get around them.  He seems to have seen his share of hardness and bad things happening on the inside.  He also strikes me as a very smart and meticulous person who makes sure that he has plans for plans when they fall apart.
 
We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?
He seems to be more of a bloodhound, following the scent no matter where it may lead him.  He is determined to find the truth and get to the bottom of whatever case he is working on, no matter the cost to him.
 
Why do you think Grens detects something wrong about the stories he's being given by police and prison officials?
So many things were throwing red flags out for him, such as the "violent past" of Hoffmann that still allowed him to be given the permits for the weapons, which went against all types of protocols.  And the story about him being sick and quarantined in the infirmary in the prison struck Grens as odd because he was told the night before that he could visit Hoffmann, so at that point he was showing no signs of any illnesses, and then Grens was told, just hours later, that Hoffmann was in the hospital wing not being allowed any contact with anyone because of the sudden onset of some sort of mystery illness, as yet unidentified by the doctor.  Just didn't sit well with Grens.  It was all too perfectly timed.  And then later on, when he is called to become the gold commander at the prison, he finds out that Hoffmann is the hostage taker, and the story he was told about Hoffmann being sick, again, doesn't fit with what is going on then.
 
Why does Grens attempt to go the cemetery twice in these chapters? Can you describe his struggle?
He attempts to go to the cemetery twice because he feels that he is ready to face the fact that she is gone, really and truly gone for good, but is "conveniently" not able to due to things that are out of his control.  He struggles with going because he isn't really ready to face the fact that she isn't coming back, even though he knows this to be true.  He does not want to face the reality that he is now without her for the rest of his life.  He is still, even after all this time, in the early stages of grief, and he is finding it hard to deal with that grief and he's not real sure what to do to move on.

 

“A home without books is a body without soul.” ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero
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fordmg
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three


OKC_NookJA wrote:

 


Peppermill wrote: 

OKC_NookJA wrote:
We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?

Grens likes to keep distant from other officers. He is determined to solve his cases and "doesn't give up".

He is a saint compared to Erik Wilson and his supervisor Gronnason. Grens would never recruit a criminal to infiltrate crime organizations and he certainly wouldn't "burn" them. He wouldn't cover up infiltrators crimes.

 


Which is probably part of why Grens is never assigned to become a "handler" nor is sent for special training.  This is part of where I wonder what kind of statement B&H are making about the U.S. role in crime solving and terror control going forward.  They do make it clear their literary intent includes social criticism.  How much voice can ordinary citizens have about such tactics?

 

What assessment of bad guy versus good guy do you think the authors want the readers to have of Erik Wilson?

 


 

SPOILER ALERT

 

At the back of the book, the authors say that the police recruiting and using infiltrator's, sometimes burning them and letting them get away with crimes is based on fact.

 

Of course, the police superiors would recruit officers to do this type of work. Makes it interesting that Wilson and Grens had the same supervisor.

 

Erik Wilson is sent off to Georgia for training and then his boss burns Hoffman. When Sven interviews Wilson, he confirms who was involved because they burned Hoffman without Wilson being involved. Wilson doesn't say he disagrees with the burning.

 

So what I took away from Wilson is that he is the same as Goransson. Just as complicit and just as guilty.

 


SPOILERI think Wilson is a little different than Goransson.  He tried to keep up his neutral attitude for the job, but eventually gave in and said he didn't like th epolice burning his guy.  He also indicates in the "margins" that he was already missing Piet.  So he did care about his informant, but had to put up a front.

MG

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bmseara
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

How would you judge Piet as a man in these chapters if you'd had no picture of his life outside the prison walls before this?

 

This question is hard for me because I do have that vision.  I assume I would view him as a snitch.  I would be fearful that his life was in danger and I would want to know what lead up to him being a snitch or if he even was one.  I would more than likely think he was a bad guy.  I tend to make judgements quickly and sometimes I am accurate, but sometimes I am not. 

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stkong7
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

For a while, I was rooting for Grens not figure out this case, then I switched to anxiously hoping that Grens finds out everything.  I could see this story being turned into a really good movie.  The suspense, the surprises, the intensity just kept me wanting to ready more.

 

Its very funny though that Piet utilized, what seems like, every part of his back up plan.  Its like he knew they were gonna burn him.  If the reader wasn't exposed to his background, we would really think he was an expert secret agent without a family or a conscience.  He risked alot taking on this assignment, and his reasons for doing so puzzles me.  Some where in the book, it was alluded that because of his first offence he was almost "cornered" into taking on this task to be an informant.  But why?  His earlier crimes didn't warrant such a commitment.  What do you think?

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MomOf2Turds
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


OKC_NookJA wrote:

 

His plans were very elaborate and I don't think they would mirror reality or what could be possible. No one could predict what would happen with that degree of accuracy.


 

I believe I must respectfully disagree with you there, OKC.  This is just like a chess game.  Master chess players know what moves to expect from their opponents so that they can prepare for them.  He was thinking ahead.  It's not that far off base from reality.  He knew that if he was ousted as an infiltrator his life would be on the line.  He took precautions for that.  He wanted to do the best that he could to try and make it out alive so that he could be with his family again.  

 

What was it that you felt was too elaborately planned to be believed?

“A home without books is a body without soul.” ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero
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T-Mo
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎08-31-2009

Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

I have to agree, for a while I was hoping that Grens wouldn't figure out what was going on. And now, like you, I am hoping that soon he will find the freshly dug ground at the grave, and begin to figure out the truth. He needs to follow his instincts!! He already feels as if something is not right. 

 

I couldn't help wondering, once Mariana figured out that Grens had been lied to about Piet being ill, where was she going!?? I know she was going to the church to inform Grens since she couldn't reach him on the phone- but this is the first time that we have seen how long it takes someone to get from the prison to the church. Everyone else has just gone back and forth from one to the other, and I didn't realize they had to drive back and forth. I was under the impression you could access one from the other. 

 

On a lighter note, I got a chuckle out of this: "...he had held the dread at bay with chin-ups, and sit-ups and jumping on and off the bed with both his feet held together. There wasn't much space and he had hit the wall a couple of times..." (pg. 206). I realize it was important for him to keep moving, to keep himself busy, otherwise he would have driven himself mad with thoughts of Zofia and the kids, as well as with fear. However, it was a little comical to me, that he would jump off his bed in that manner, accidentally hit his head on the wall, and continue to do it, until he perfected not hitting the wall. All I could picture was a wired little boy... 

 

 

 


stkong7 wrote:

For a while, I was rooting for Grens not figure out this case, then I switched to anxiously hoping that Grens finds out everything.  I could see this story being turned into a really good movie.  The suspense, the surprises, the intensity just kept me wanting to ready more.

 

Its very funny though that Piet utilized, what seems like, every part of his back up plan.  Its like he knew they were gonna burn him.  If the reader wasn't exposed to his background, we would really think he was an expert secret agent without a family or a conscience.  He risked alot taking on this assignment, and his reasons for doing so puzzles me.  Some where in the book, it was alluded that because of his first offence he was almost "cornered" into taking on this task to be an informant.  But why?  His earlier crimes didn't warrant such a commitment.  What do you think?


 

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BookWoman718
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three


MomOf2Turds wrote:
 
We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?
He seems to be more of a bloodhound, following the scent no matter where it may lead him.  He is determined to find the truth and get to the bottom of whatever case he is working on, no matter the cost to him.
 
Why do you think Grens detects something wrong about the stories he's being given by police and prison officials?
So many things were throwing red flags out for him, such as the "violent past" of Hoffmann that still allowed him to be given the permits for the weapons, which went against all types of protocols.  And the story about him being sick and quarantined in the infirmary in the prison struck Grens as odd because he was told the night before that he could visit Hoffmann, so at that point he was showing no signs of any illnesses, and then Grens was told, just hours later, that Hoffmann was in the hospital wing not being allowed any contact with anyone because of the sudden onset of some sort of mystery illness, as yet unidentified by the doctor.  Just didn't sit well with Grens.  It was all too perfectly timed.  And then later on, when he is called to become the gold commander at the prison, he finds out that Hoffmann is the hostage taker, and the story he was told about Hoffmann being sick, again, doesn't fit with what is going on then.
 

 
I think there are people who are gifted with an investigative mind.  They usually can retain an unusually large number of facts and have mentally organized them into coherent patterns.   It's as though their mind works as a matrix, rather than in a linear fashion.  They can make 'jumps' from one set of information to another, that simply don't occur to other people.  I believe most great detectives must have minds that work like that.  I worked in banking, and found that auditors often have the same set of skills.  Small anomalies loom much larger to them than they do to the typical manager or administrator.   It's almost like what we think of as 'intuition' but it's more definable than that.  They make connections that others miss.   There are no doubt other occupations in which this can push people to do extraordinary work.  I think some of our best investigative journalists may have something like that.  They can sniff out a great story from small clues that others just pass right by.   
 
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MSaff
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

  The entire section of Part 3 deals with fear.  Piet has been incarcerated in the prison to infiltrate and take over the drug trade from the Polish Mafia.  He knows that he could be found out at any moment, and we see that he is found out rather quickly.  Piet staged various items for his own protection throughout the prison and, as we read in the second section, in Library books, that he had ordered to be brought to him in prison. 

  Piet thinks that he has planned for every contingency.  The problem is that apparently, no one in an official capacity at the prison knows why he is there in the first place and the way his record was altered, Piet is known as a very dangerous criminal.  He may be just that, a very dangerous criminal, yet the police are using him to get to the mafia.  Why they think it will be different this time is beyond me.  If you remember, it was mentioned earlier in the novel that every time a mafia was to be infiltrated from the inside of a prison, something went wrong and that infiltrator was found out and killed.  What makes them think that Piet will have any better success?

  We also see fear not only in Piet, but in the man he kills, the hostages he takes and in the police who must respond to the prison.  This is what makes this whole section a scarey situation.

Mike
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind." Dr. Seuss
http://travelswithcarsandbooks.blogspot.com/
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LadyMin
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


TudorRose wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

I am not far enough into Part 3 yet to answer all of the questions but this story is making me want to shake a fist at all the people involved in Piet's life. They are using him and yes, he knows they are using him, but, the ease with which they betray him is horrifying to me. They are so concerned for their own skins that they never consider his. They just decide to sacrifice him.

What disturbes me most is that they don't realize that they are just as guilty, perhaps guiltier than he is because they see him as a criminal but they do not see themselves that way and they are just as much a criminal as he is for what they have done.

They use him to accomplish their job and then when something goes awry, they don't try and save him, they save themselves. What makes them better than him?. He is making a sacrifice to help them, they are sacrificing him! Oh, I am so angry. I am even angrier when I think that these kinds of behaviors often go undiscovered if not for these kinds of authors who expose them.

Okay, I have to reduce my blood pressure and read on.


Well said WanderingJew.  I totally agree that the people in the government as just as bad as the criminals in this book.  In this situation, Piet is not guilty of anything.  The government has just ordered his execution.  This is so horrific.  Sending an innocent man to his death without any concern for him or his family while they just sit back and justify their actions is incomprehensible to me. 


And the way they justified some of their actions by thinking it was ok if they let someone else do their dirty work was despicable. Let the prisoners kill Piet, let Grens make the decision to shoot, let the sharpshooter kill Piet. They are such twisted individuals that they don't see the connection between their lies and the decisions that other people are making based on these lies. And ultimately how it will impact those people if and when they discover the truth.

 

~Leslie

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LadyMin
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


dhaupt wrote:

 


literature wrote:

 


dhaupt wrote:

 


literature wrote:
I just have to let off some steam.  Part III was W-O-W.  .

 

I am completely disillusioned with Wilson, have lost all respect for him.  WHERE IS HE?  He talks about how much Piet means to him, he's become a friend. 

 

Hi literature, I remember in part two when Erik and Piet were putting the final touches on the prison sentence that Wilson stated that it would be some days before he would know if anything went wrong because he would be back at Quantico.

And I remember in part three while Piet was in prison that he recounted this.

 

I reserving my opinion of Erik until I find out more in part four, because I'm still giving him the benefit of the doubt.

 


 

You're a better person than me!  I should be more patient.  Wilson was down in the southern part of Georgia, not Quantico.  I reread the beginning pages again this morning to see if I could pick up some new feelings about Wilson.  He is a hardened human being, a loner and a very lonely person but capable of showing emotion to Piet.  


That's right it was Georgia, good call literature. And as far as feelings for Erik, I think we each have to be true to ourselves.

 


 

I reread the beginning pages too. I wanted to see how long Erik was to be in Georgia. Two more weeks.

 

I noticed that when 'Paula' called to ask Erik (in the beginning pages) to meet him because there was a problem, an unplanned drug drop, he said he was abroad and could not provide any backup. Erik wanted Paula to pull out and not go in alone.

 

We know that Erik's bosses are aware of Paula's infiltrating the mob, so to me this meant that they would not be of any help if there was a problem. Why? Probably because they do not want to be connected to them in any way possible. So, it didn't surprise me that Piet was completely cut off from Erik.

 

~Leslie

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cubicleblindnessKM
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

Oh sure, it is human nature to both be good and bad. On a daily basis you make the decisions you think will result in the appropriate results. Criminals can be good. Just to be labeled a criminal does not mean you don't have the ability to act human and be kind. Same as if you had "law enforcement" training. Police traning never designates one as being "good" sure good intentions at first, but pure human nature to act out and have bad behavior. I can see where the authors wanted to point this out in the ending. It's a great ending point to make with this story.

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cubicleblindnessKM
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

Piet was very smart, and a detailed planner. But what makes all that work is follow through. The best part of follow through is a back-up plan. He did all the possible right steps to get to the necessary end. That is not always true, there can always be something that ruins all plans pursued, but Piet was going at it the right way the whole time as best he could.

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Lildove3
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Re: Fear

I have to agree with our fellow discussion participant DSaff. Fear has a way to destroying and breaking down most individuals. Fear contains many evils of distrucion.

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Passie71
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

In what ways were Piet Hoffmann's plans for entering prison working out exactly as he'd organized them? 
He seemed to have everything covered, the how to get the drugs into prison and contingency plans for the "what if's" that happen.  I am learning way to much about the drug world!  They have not said yet if and who finds the drugs in the tulips.  I keep waiting for them to open :smileyhappy:
 
What was life in prison like and how did Piet fit in there? 
Piet knew exactly how things would go and how to secure his place in prison society.  The thought of the "3 seconds" before someone would come in and try to kill him for being a snitch was genius.  He was also very quick to figure out who the suppliers were and how to eliminate them.  I just love this book!
 
What interferes with his carefully orchestrated plans? 
The authorities and also the lawyer who was brought in by the other drug lord.  Some of this part is still kind of confusing me.  I keep wondering where his so called "friend" is on the outside (Erik Wilson).  Where has he disappeared to and why is he not answering his phone.  Maybe he has been found out as well and is dead somewhere?
 
How would you judge Piet as a man in these chapters if you'd had no picture of his life outside the prison walls before this? 
A very "bad" dude who has been in this game for awhile.  He is cold and has no compassion for others who are around him.  He is there to survive and will do what is necessary to accomplish this and will kill those in his way.
 
We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?
Ewert is a very driven man who is trying to find out the truth.  He seems very honest and hard working unlike his superiors and co-workers in the department.
 
Why do you think Grens detects something wrong about the stories he's being given by police and prison officials? 
When Grens was given the 3 names and noticed that Piet had a gun license even though he was considered dangerous.  Things just don't add up for Grens and he is determined to figure out who was in that room.
 
Why does Grens attempt to go the cemetery twice in these chapters? Can you describe his struggle?
He is attempting to visit his wife.  He is struggling with letting go and moving on.  But he has taken great strides to accomplish this.  It is a daily struggle for him.
Staci
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JamesterCK
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

The tulips arrived, as planned so he was able to deliver the drugs. That was such a clever way to smuggle it into the prison, but it wouldn't have worked if he hadn't been secured the job that he had. He does eventually get his books too, which is crucial. He definitely had everything planned out well in advance.

 

He fits in very well in prison. He knows what the hierarchy is like inside, and what he has to do to get to the top and he does it amazingly fast. No one suspected a thing, he was very convincing.

 

Someone comes to the prison and informs an inmate about Piet's real reason for being at the prison. And all hell breaks loose.

 

If I had no knowledge about Piet prior to his being in prison, it would be easy to assume that this is someone who has been in prison a lot in his life. He's cold, calculating, and only wants to become the number one drug runner inside. It would be easy to form a vastly different opinion of him with this as your only information.

 

Grens is definitely different from the other officers he works with; he never gives up. Even when everyone else calls it quits, he continues until he finds the answer. He prides himself on that fact and anything else is failure.

 

The police and prison officials get caught in their own lies. Like when the guy at the prison told Grens that he couldn't talk to Hoffman because he was in the infirmary, it was obvious he knew that the lie was going to come back and steamroll him before too long. Grens doesn't seem to miss much, and he's very good at putting the pieces together; it was only a matter of time before he started catching on. And I was SO relieved that he did start to figure it out, poor Piet was doing his best to stay alive, but when the only people who know who you really are throw you to the wolves it would become a desperate situation.

 

I think Grens tries to go to the cemetery to get closure and to try to extinguish his guilt and grief. But it's hard for him to face her, even though she's dead.

Jamie"Bookerella" Kline
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ilenekm
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 

I finally had a chance to finish this section today and I really want to read on to find out what happened. I haven't read through many comments in this thread because I keep hitting upon the spoiler alerts and don't want to see them.  After I finish, I will go back and read the comments.
In what ways were Piet Hoffmann's plans for entering prison working out exactly as he'd organized them?
Piet's plans for entering prison were great. He planned everything out meticulously. I was amazed at his ingenuity that enabled him to get the drugs and gun into the prison undetected.  Also, how he went to the church tower before going in.  I think that because he was playing both sides, the Polish mafia and the police, he realized that there was a good chance that he would be called out as a snitch and needed to plan for what he would do. 
 
What was life in prison like and how did Piet fit in there?
I didn't get the feeling that Piet fit in very well. He was skittish about leaving his cell in the morning and got the prime work detail seemingly undeservedly.  There wasn't much interaction with other prisoners other than the drug deals. Almost immediately after that, he was tagged as a snitch.
 
What interferes with his carefully orchestrated plans?
The government people got scared when Ewert wanted to speak to Piet so they called him out as a snitch.  They liked Piet when he was doing well for them but once they were at risk of being exposed, they needed to have him turn up dead.  I really dont get any feeling that the mafia was involved at all other than the lawyer who called him out.
 
How would you judge Piet as a man in these chapters if you'd had no picture of his life outside the prison walls before this?
violent and calculating. Not a very good person
 
We spend quite a lot of time in these chapters observing Ewert Grens. How does he compare to the other officers he works with and for?
 
He seems honest and above board unlike the others who are trying to cover-up what they have done.  I believe that he is trying to do a good job with the information that he has.  He comes across as very thorough and someone who really loves his job.  It is clear that he has had personal setbacks recently and devotes himself only to his job. 


 

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mv5ocean
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three


In what ways were Piet Hoffmann's plans for entering prison working out exactly as he'd organized them?
He was so meticulous, especially with the books and knowing where he could and could not be seen from the window, making certain the flowers were there and he cleaned that office. All of those things were falling into place and it almost looked easy even though it was impossible to believe.
 
What was life in prison like and how did Piet fit in there?
Piet fit in simply because he had been there before, knew all the different things to watch out for and had prepared in advance to protect himself.  It was made clear even still that he was petrified things would go wrong.
 
 
How would you judge Piet as a man in these chapters if you'd had no picture of his life outside the prison walls before this?
Having no previous knowledge of Piet, I would make the assumption that he was a conniving criminal who would do whatever it took to get out, including murder.  I would feel no sympathy for him at all. Interesting how because of the simple information giving beforehand I have a completely different perspective of him now.
 
 
 
 

 

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mv5ocean
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three


My next question to the authors is going to be, have there been any cases that came to light where this sort of thing actually happened?   The police and beaurocrats entering into a conspiracy to burn an informant, I mean. 


I too would be most interested in finding out if this is a fairly common occurrence or not actually a recurring scenario.  Alas, I think our authors must have become extremely busy as that thread hasn't been very active lately.  I'm wondering if the language barrier could be an issue (they could be fluent in English I'm not sure) just throwing that out there.  There are so many things I would love to learn from these guys but I just think our conversations between readers are the only thing keeping that thread going lately.  Hopefully they will chime back in soon and answer all of our questions. :smileyvery-happy:

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pen21
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Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Three Seconds: Part Three

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Whew, I needed to take breaks in between the reading because of the tension created in me. I wanted to answer the phone when Piet calls, I wanted to smack around the people in charge. I wanted to send out a search party for Wilson! If reading about it makes me feel so frustrated and angry about the situation, what must a person trapped in the system feel?

I have about 40 pages to go for part 3. Rest time is over.


I agree totally. This section is something else. This part drove me nuts. You described exactly how I felt.